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Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
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We heard it's National Moon Day and we're reminded of ceramist Toshiko Takaezu's signature moon pots.

In this photograph, the sculptures are enjoying a nice day in a grove of trees: some are resting on the ground and others have been strung up in hammocks. http://s.si.edu/29WnEHF

Read more about Takaezu's process in her 2003 oral history interview, http://s.si.edu/2abRKMg
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Cancel your weekend plans: the exhibition files and photographs from the Leo Castelli Gallery records have been digitized and are now available on our website.

Browse them at http://s.si.edu/29YZCND

image: Raul Julia, Joel Grey, Elizabeth Taylor, Isabella Rossellini, Leo Castelli, and David Lynch at the "Art Against AIDS Auction," December 14, 1987. Photograph by Roxanne Lowit. Leo Castelli Gallery records.
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Mail Art Monday brings us to Rome. Dada artist Buster Cleveland embellished this postcard of the Castle of the Holy Angel for John Evans during his travels through Europe in the 1980s. http://s.si.edu/28IP3S6

Citation: Buster Cleveland mail art to John Evans, 198-?. John Evans papers, 1972-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, ‪#‎OpenYourArchives‬ ‪#‎MailArtMonday‬
View the Image and Media Gallery item Buster Cleveland mail art to John Evans, with links to more digitized items from the John Evans papers in the Archives of American Art.
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Join us in observing Mail Art Monday over the next several months. Each week we will share highlights from our collections of the international Mail Art Movement. We begin the series with this colorful envelope by Swedish artist Peter R. Meyer, who reminds us that "Mail art is not fine art, it is the artist who is fine."

Citation: Peter R. Meyer to John Held, Jr., 1994. John Held papers relating to Mail Art, 1973-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. http://s.si.edu/1UeY2oj #OpenYourArchive
View the Image and Media Gallery item Peter R. Meyer mail art to John Held, with links to more digitized items from the John Held papers relating to Mail Art in the Archives of American Art.
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Want to explore the letters, diaries, and oral history interviews of artists? Intern with us this fall! The deadline to apply is June 1. Details are at http://s.si.edu/1BjVgEQ
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Don Eddy once described himself as “an obsessive-compulsive precisionist.” His process begins with several photographs, each portraying the same arrangement of objects from slightly different angles. Eddy combines elements from these sources to bring sharp focus to every object, every glimmer of light, and every reflective surface. In an interview, the artist explained that the final paintings “force the viewer to see the act of translation from the object to the photo to the painting.” His reference photographs are on view in our exhibit "Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art" http://s.si.edu/1Sc8Nrk
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Take a peek into our mail art collections http://s.si.edu/29PKenz #MailArtMonday #PostalArt
View the Image and Media Gallery item David Geiger mail art to John Evans, with links to more digitized items from the John Evans papers in the Archives of American Art.
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"Give up art / Save the starving"

Mail artist Tony Lowes began to disseminate this provacative manifesto on badges, stickers, and postcards in 1986. This particular copy was mailed to fellow mail artist John Held, Jr. in 1988. Lowes's critique of art draws on Calvinist iconoclasm and traditions of Dada. http://s.si.edu/29xO1n5 #MailArtMonday
View the Image and Media Gallery item Tony Lowes Mail Art to John Held, with links to more digitized items from the John Held papers relating to Mail Art in the Archives of American Art.
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"If you see a banana skin, eat it; don't slip on it."

Lenore Tawney is known for her fiber sculptures and collages. She was also a frequent correspondent who sent hundreds of postcard collages to her friends. Here she writes to artist and performer Lillian Kiesler.

Citation: Lenore Tawney letter to Lillian Kiesler, 1982 May 26. Lillian and Frederick Kiesler papers, http://s.si.edu/28JaDD1 #‎OpenYourArchives‬ ‪#‎MailArtMonday‬
View the Image and Media Gallery item Lenore Tawney letter to Lillian Kiesler, with links to more digitized items from the Lillian and Frederick Kiesler papers in the Archives of American Art.
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Mail Art Monday: "Dear God! What's the MAIL ART I keep hearing about?"

Riffing on Michelangelo's "The Creation of Adam," artist Anna Banana situates herself as Adam and artist Ray Johnson as God. Johnson was founder of the New York Correspondance School (sic), a prominent and inclusive network of mail artists. Anna Banana has been active in the mail art movement since the 1970s.

Citation: Anna Banana mail art to John Evans, 2008. John Evans papers, 1972-2012, bulk 1970s-2012. http://s.si.edu/1WF7SpW ‪#‎OpenYourArchive‬
View the Image and Media Gallery item Anna Banana mail art to John Evans, with links to more digitized items from the John Evans papers in the Archives of American Art.
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Think this pig nose something we don't?

Sculptor Anne Arnold and her husband, the abstract painter Ernest Briggs, owned a house with a barn in Montville, Maine, where they raised farm animals, including pigs, cows, and chickens, and kept many dogs and cats. Arnold frequently relied on photographs of her menagerie to create her lively sculptures of animals in metal and wood. Many of her source photographs are on view in our current exhibition, "Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art," http://s.si.edu/1Sc8Nrk #FindingSources
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More than a decade before the founder of Instagram was even born, multi-media artist Esta Nesbitt was experimenting with filters. Nesbitt would make various printed iterations of an original collage using a Xerox machine and color transparencies. Her studies would inform her xerographic artworks and films.

Nesbitt's source materials are currently on view in our exhibition "Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art," http://s.si.edu/1Sc8Nrk #FindingSources
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Have them in circles
489 people
Mart Ina S.'s profile photo
Christopher Hilferty's profile photo
Josephteri Holman's profile photo
Cine to DVD Transfer's profile photo
Ben Mouh's profile photo
Leafy Land's profile photo
taylor swift's profile photo
Videos King's profile photo
Jack Chrisman's profile photo
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The world's largest and most widely used resource dedicated to collecting and preserving the papers and primary records of the visual arts in America.
Introduction

The Archives of American Art is the world’s pre-eminent and most widely used research center dedicated to collecting, preserving, and providing access to primary sources that document the history of the visual arts in America.

Our vast holdings—more than 16 million letters, diaries and scrapbooks of artists, dealers, and collectors; manuscripts of critics and scholars; business and financial records of museums, galleries, schools, and associations; photographs of art world figures and events; sketches and sketchbooks; rare printed material; film, audio and video recordings; and the largest collection of oral histories anywhere on the subject of art—are a vital resource to anyone interested in American culture over the past 200 years.

Explore and Search our Archival Research Collections

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