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Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
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Think this pig nose something we don't?

Sculptor Anne Arnold and her husband, the abstract painter Ernest Briggs, owned a house with a barn in Montville, Maine, where they raised farm animals, including pigs, cows, and chickens, and kept many dogs and cats. Arnold frequently relied on photographs of her menagerie to create her lively sculptures of animals in metal and wood. Many of her source photographs are on view in our current exhibition, "Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art," http://s.si.edu/1Sc8Nrk #FindingSources
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More than a decade before the founder of Instagram was even born, multi-media artist Esta Nesbitt was experimenting with filters. Nesbitt would make various printed iterations of an original collage using a Xerox machine and color transparencies. Her studies would inform her xerographic artworks and films.

Nesbitt's source materials are currently on view in our exhibition "Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art," http://s.si.edu/1Sc8Nrk #FindingSources
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What color is snow? Oscar Bluemner’s source files, which he organized by “art motifs,” often informed his paintings. In one file, he gathered materials concerning the aesthetics of snow. “The lower sky is a beautiful pale turquoise blue making the white snow grow,” he observed in some notes. Many annotations are written in German, Bluemner’s native language. Find more source materials on our exhibition webpage http://s.si.edu/1Sc8Nrk
Exhibition: Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
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Although it's the last day of Women's History Month (also known as the month of March), this letter keeps us motivated year round. Crush it.

Nancy Spero to Lucy R. Lippard, 1971 Oct. 29. Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2010.
s.si.edu/1q5tjTu
#5womenartists #DearLucy
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Terry the Dog is always showing off on Leap Day. Here he leaps through the arms of artist Allen Tupper True. s.si.edu/1TMMWeS
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Want to explore the letters, diaries, and oral history interviews of artists? Intern with us this fall! The deadline to apply is June 1. Details are at http://s.si.edu/1BjVgEQ
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Don Eddy once described himself as “an obsessive-compulsive precisionist.” His process begins with several photographs, each portraying the same arrangement of objects from slightly different angles. Eddy combines elements from these sources to bring sharp focus to every object, every glimmer of light, and every reflective surface. In an interview, the artist explained that the final paintings “force the viewer to see the act of translation from the object to the photo to the painting.” His reference photographs are on view in our exhibit "Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art" http://s.si.edu/1Sc8Nrk
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Many of Dotty Attie's artworks begin with a postcards or a reproduction of a classical European painting. “I really like my sources. . . . I’ve always been a referential artist; I’ve always had to work from something,” the artist wrote in a 1992 statement. The source of this sketch is "Infanta María Teresa" by Diego Velázquez (1660). Attie's sketchbook and related documents are currently on view in our exhibit "Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art" http://s.si.edu/1Sc8Nrk #FindingSources
Exhibition: Finding: Source Material in the Archives of American Art - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
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"Feminist art opens a new world of vision!" wrote painter Audrey Flack in response to the question "What is Feminist Art?"

The question was posed by organizers at the Woman's Building in 1976. Browse other responses by women artists at http://s.si.edu/1Rh8Si1
collections image and media gallery what is feminist art
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Louise Nevelson was one of the giants of 20th century American sculpture. A good one to know next time you’re asked to name #5womenartists. Learn more about her in her fully digitized papers on our site: http://s.si.edu/1TnVk4K

Image: Louise Nevelson, ca. 1931 / unidentified photographer.

Quote: Katherine P. Rouse essay on Louise Nevelson, 1966 Jan. 26, page 2.

Both from: Louise Nevelson papers, circa 1903-1979. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
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The world's largest and most widely used resource dedicated to collecting and preserving the papers and primary records of the visual arts in America.
Introduction

The Archives of American Art is the world’s pre-eminent and most widely used research center dedicated to collecting, preserving, and providing access to primary sources that document the history of the visual arts in America.

Our vast holdings—more than 16 million letters, diaries and scrapbooks of artists, dealers, and collectors; manuscripts of critics and scholars; business and financial records of museums, galleries, schools, and associations; photographs of art world figures and events; sketches and sketchbooks; rare printed material; film, audio and video recordings; and the largest collection of oral histories anywhere on the subject of art—are a vital resource to anyone interested in American culture over the past 200 years.

Explore and Search our Archival Research Collections

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