Profile

Cover photo
APS Physics
4,751 followers|812,808 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
Mystery solved: Zig-zag stripes can appear at an angle to the drying front in a colloid. Experiments and theory now show that the stripes result from stresses inside the drying solid made of particles settling together as water evaporates. Drying colloids are important in paints, inks, and coatings.
Experiments explain why solidifying colloids sometimes form zigzagging stripes as they dry.
2
1
Андрей Рогачёв's profile photo
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
The APS March Meeting 2016 is heading to Baltimore! We're planning an exciting meeting with invited and contributed session from 24 APS units, career development, social events, and lots of networking opportunities. Abstract submission and registration will open next month. Stay tuned for details!

#apsmarch
2
1
Андрей Рогачёв's profile photo
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
Studying for the physics GRE Subject Test? Don't miss this free APS webinar to help you prepare! Space is limited, so register now http://go.aps.org/1J2uclG
4
2
Ezaz Ahamed's profile photoАндрей Рогачёв's profile photoDan Kulp's profile photo
 
air call receib
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
In 1962 physicists demonstrated that neutrinos come in more than one "flavor," and in the process, developed the neutrino beam concept that is at the core of today's largest neutrino experiments.
A gargantuan experiment in 1962 showed that neutrinos come in two varieties, electron and muon.
8
2
Андрей Рогачёв's profile photoahmad hazazi's profile photo
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
In "atomtronics" research, physicists coax cold atoms in traps to operate the way electrons do in electronic circuits, in hopes of building future devices and also studying fundamental physics principles. Now a team has demonstrated negative differential resistance—normally seen in diodes—where an increase in voltage leads to a decrease in current.
Rubidium atoms in an optical trap have been made to exhibit negative differential conductance, a phenomenon normally found in semiconductor diodes.
52
20
Monique Zorzella's profile photoKrishna Prasad's profile photoSunddher S's profile photoDiadon Acs (Conscious Energies)'s profile photo
 
Doesn't this happen in any resonant circuit? 
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
Some craters are formed by collapse of the ground into an underground void, rather than by an impact. Experiments with sand show that these collapse craters look different from impact craters, research that could help scientists assess planetary terrains.
3
1
Андрей Рогачёв's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
4,751 people
Muhammad Marey's profile photo
Nematollah Iri's profile photo
Tycko Franklin's profile photo
Shili Yang's profile photo
Bernard Schaeffer's profile photo
Sandro Meloni's profile photo
Aaron Segall's profile photo
Journal of Advances in Physics's profile photo
Amina Ait Oumeziane's profile photo

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
Don't miss the first joint meeting of the APS National Mentoring Community & APS Bridge Program! The conference will bring together nationally recognized scholars with extensive experience in advancing undergraduates in physics to discuss mentoring, physics bridge programs, grad school admissions, career development, and more. Register now! http://go.aps.org/1J5jLOx
5
1
Андрей Рогачёв's profile photo
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
As physicist Ken Hicks explains in this Viewpoint commentary, the discovery of the pentaquark (a never-before-seen combination of five quarks) could lead to a better understanding of the strong force.
A new type of particle containing five quarks has been observed by the LHCb experiment.
6
1
Андрей Рогачёв's profile photo
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
Some improvements in scanning tunneling microscopy techniques allow imaging of the structure within a molecule at room temperature and without modifying the probe tip.
An improved take on an existing approach provides intramolecular imaging of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface at room temperature.
5
1
Андрей Рогачёв's profile photo
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Dark Energy Survey has published a detailed map of dark matter in one patch of sky as a first step in studying dark energy— a mysterious expanding force in the Universe. Since dark matter is invisible, they instead imaged large numbers of distant galaxies in search of tiny distortions caused light rays being bent by the gravity of intervening dark matter.
The Dark Energy Survey has generated a map of invisible dark matter by observing tiny gravitationally induced distortions in the images of distant galaxies.
7
3
Narges Aghamir's profile photoGuillermo Rubilar's profile photo
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nanoscale forces are key to explaining how puddles behave. They become important at the edges of a puddle, where the fluid surface gets very close to the solid underneath.
Classical fluid theory can't explain a puddle that spreads and then stops. A new theory solves the problem by incorporating intermolecular forces between the liquid and the solid underneath.
1
2
Андрей Рогачёв's profile photobc0209 ufabc's profile photo
Add a comment...

APS Physics

Shared publicly  - 
 
Bird flocks, insect swarms, cell colonies—these are "active matter," where many identical elements can propel themselves and generate large-scale, collective phenomena. Top researchers in the field recently met in China.
At the meeting, researchers presented new models to describe the developing wing of a young fly, colloidal particles that propel themselves, and the liquidlike behavior of cell colonies .
12
4
Sahaschai Thomya's profile photoVisionlearning's profile photo
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
4,751 people
Muhammad Marey's profile photo
Nematollah Iri's profile photo
Tycko Franklin's profile photo
Shili Yang's profile photo
Bernard Schaeffer's profile photo
Sandro Meloni's profile photo
Aaron Segall's profile photo
Journal of Advances in Physics's profile photo
Amina Ait Oumeziane's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Email
Story
Tagline
Working to advance and diffuse the knowledge of physics
Introduction
The American Physical Society (APS) is a non-profit membership organization working to advance and diffuse the knowledge of physics through its outstanding research journals, scientific meetings, and education, outreach, advocacy and international activities. APS represents more than 50,000 members, including physicists in academia, national laboratories and industry in the United States and throughout the world. Society offices are located in College Park, Maryland (Headquarters), Ridge, New York, and Washington, DC.