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A superfluid flows with zero viscosity. If you spin spin it, a lattice of vortices forms to exactly cancel the angular momentum. Superfluids made from bosonic atoms have different properties from those made of fermionic atoms. Now researchers have mixed both types together and seen interactions among the vortices. The system could be a model for understanding boson-fermion interaction in superconducting materials.
Researchers mixed two superfluids of different atoms together and observed that vortices in one affected those in the other—evidence of mutual interaction between the two species.
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Yesterday, APS hosted an interactive webinar with Raymond Beausoleil of Hewlett Packard Enterprise to give an overview of industrial postdocs and provide tips on how to get one. Lots of great advice for grad students and early career physicists. 
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RESPECTED SIR

KINDLY SEND VIEWPOINT ALERTS SIR

I HAD SUBSCRIBED TO YOU ESTEEMED AND EMINENET REVIEWS TOO

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BEST WISHES AND WARM REGARDS
PRASANNNAKUMAR
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The APS LeRoy Apker Award recognizes outstanding achievements in physics by undergraduate students. This year's finalists traveled to DC last month to present their research to the Award's selection committee. The two winners will be announced this fall.

Fun fact: Kristin Wiig's character in the new Ghostbusters movie (Erin Gilbert) has an Apker Award on the wall in her office.
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LIGO can detect gravitational waves in part because it uses laser light that is extremely stable, meaning that the fluctuations in intensity and frequency are small. "Squeezing" is a quantum technique that would reduce fluctuations even more. A German team has now reached a record low level of fluctuations, 32 times lower than expected classically. 
Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been “squeezed” to a record low.
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On the largest scales, the Universe is like Swiss cheese, full of cosmic voids containing very few galaxies. Researchers have used the low density of galaxies near such voids to measure the expansion rate of the Universe and the fraction of the total energy that is composed of matter (not dark matter or dark energy). Low density regions like these are expected to show deviations from Einstein's predictions most clearly, but no such deviations have appeared so far.
The distribution of galaxies around regions of relatively empty space can be used to constrain cosmological parameters.
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Register now for this free interactive webinar to learn real tips and strategies for securing an industrial postdoc position after graduation. Great for grad students and early career physicists.
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The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) is now accepting applications for The 5+ Club! The 5+ Club recognizes institutions that graduate 5 or more physics teachers in a given year. 5+ Club member institutions receive national recognition for their outstanding contributions to the education of future physics teachers.
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The PhysTec on the way to global recognition
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The Universe appears to be the same in every direction we look, and this isotropy is consistent with conventional cosmological theories. But researchers need to continue checking at ever higher levels of precision to look for signs of discrepancies, which could give clues to the next generation of theories. A new study of the cosmic microwave background gives the odds of anisotropy at 1 in 121,000.
A new study of the cosmic microwave background places the strictest limits to date on a rotating Universe and other forms of cosmic anisotropy.
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The roundworm C. elegans is a favorite of biologists, but physicists have now studied how it swims. In the 100th paper published in the new journal Physical Review Fluids, researchers report combining experiments and computer models to gain a complete description of the fluid flow around the swimming worm. The paper is accessible without a subscription.
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Applications are now open for the 2017 APS Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics! APS CUWiP are three-day conferences held at universities across North America that provide students with information, resources, and motivation to pursue a career in physics. Travel and housing funding is available. Applications are due October 14!
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When you observe two fuzzy stars close together through a telescope, the traditional way for deciding whether they can be resolved as separate objects is the 137-year-old Rayleigh criterion. Now theorists have used a quantum measurement theory to show that in principle, there is no limit to scientists' ability to resolve stars, no matter how close. The work applies to a wide range or similar situations, such as the interpretation of microscope images.
Quantum metrology shows that it is always possible to estimate the separation of two stars, no matter how close together they are.
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APS is now accepting applications for the International Research Travel Award Program. The program promotes international scientific collaborations between physicists in developed and developing countries. The deadline to apply is September 15, 2016.
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Working to advance and diffuse the knowledge of physics
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The American Physical Society (APS) is a non-profit membership organization working to advance and diffuse the knowledge of physics through its outstanding research journals, scientific meetings, and education, outreach, advocacy and international activities. APS represents more than 50,000 members, including physicists in academia, national laboratories and industry in the United States and throughout the world. Society offices are located in College Park, Maryland (Headquarters), Ridge, New York, and Washington, DC.
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