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Jeff A. Benner
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Psalm 1:1

Blessed: There are two Hebrew words translated as "blessed." One is the verb barak (Strong's #1288), meaning "to be blessed." The other is the noun esher (Strong's #835) meaning "happy," and is the word used in this passage. This noun is derived from the verb ashar (Strong's #833), which means "to be straight." The Hebrew people saw two types of paths, the straight path and the crooked path. The straight path is the shortest distance between two points and is easy to follow. The crooked path is the longer path filled with peril and fatigue and one can easily become lost. The "straight ones" are those who walk the straight path and are, as we would say, "happy."

Walk : The Hebrew word for "walk" is halak (Strong's #1980) and is used over 1300 times in the Bible. In English we would use a word like "follow" in the context of this verse, but the Hebrew people use more tangible words in their writings. Because the Hebrews saw life as a journey, they see themselves "walking" through life.

Counsel: The word etsah (Strong's #6098) means counsel, which is the giving of advice, encouragement or guidance. Within the family, or the community, the counselor would be an elder, one filled with years of wisdom and experience. The Ancient Hebrew Lexicon of the Bible identifies this word as the feminine form of the masculine word ets (Strong's #6086) meaning a "tree." In the Hebrew mind this elder is seen as the support to the community in the same way that the trunk of a tree supports the branches of the tree, the members of the family or community.

Wicked: In the English language, a wicked person is one who performs evil, destructive or hateful acts. However, in the Hebrew language the noun rasha (Strong's #7563) has a very different meaning. This noun is derived from the verb rasha (Strong's #7561) and literally means "to depart from the path." Psalm 18:21 says, For I have kept the ways of the LORD, and have not wickedly departed from my Elohiym. The phrase "wickedly departed" is the word rasha. Those who chose the crooked path easily "depart" from that path, either by walking off the path on purpose or by becoming lost from the path.

Stand: amad (Strong's #5975) is a verb meaning "to stand" but can be used in a wide variety of applications such as, to be erect or upright, to remain or maintain in the sense of standing in one place or to establish or appoint in the sense of standing in a firm position. The noun form of this verb is amud (Strong's #5982) and is a pillar which stands firm and tall. Both the verb and noun form can be found in Exodus 14:19; And the pillar (amud) of the cloud went from before their face, and stood (amad) behind them.

Way: This is the Hebrew word derek (Strong's #1870) meaning a well-marked path or trail that may be followed to lead one to a specific destination.

Sinner: The Hebrew word chatta (Strong's #2400) is one who is guilty of a crime or offense. It is derived from the verb chata (Strong's #2398) and literally means "to miss" and is used in Judges 20:16, which reads, Everyone could sling stones at an hair breadth, and not miss. When one shoots at a target and misses, he has "missed the mark." This is related in concept to the word rasha (Strong's #7563), used previously in the verse, as one who "departs" from the path, will also miss the destination of that path.

Sit: The verb yashab (Strong's #3427) literally means to dwell, such as in a lodging for the night, but can also mean to sit for a long period of time.

Seat: The noun moshab (Strong's 4186), derived out of the previous word yashab (Strong's #3427), is a dwelling place or habitation, a place where one will sit or dwell for a long period of time.

Scoffer: This is the translation of the Hebrew word luts (Strong's #3887), which literally means "to make mouths," to mimic, repeat or imitate another person's speech such as an ambassador, interpreter or mocker. In the context of this verse, this is one who mimics the actions of others and simply follows the crowd.

Literal Translation: Happy is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the lost, and in the path of the guilty he does not stand, and in the dwelling belonging to imitators he does not sit.

Expanded Translation: Happy is the man who does not walk in the counsel of those who walk away from the path, nor stands in the path of those who miss the destination, nor sits in the dwelling that belongs to those who just follow the crowd.

Summary of verse 1: Like much of the book of Psalms, this verse is written in a form of Hebrew poetry, called chiasmus, where one idea is expressed in two or more different ways by paralleling different words and phrases. In this verse the "straight ones" are those who do not walk, stand or sit (three parallel actions) in the path of the ones who depart from the path, miss the mark or follow the crowd (three parallel persons). It is also of interest that the actions are progressive, from moving along the path, to stopping in the path and then sitting down to remain. In the same way, the type of persons are also progressive, one who walks away from the path, to one who has missed the destination and then to the one who just blindly follows others.

Read the rest of the Chapter... http://www.ancient-hebrew.org/psalms/psalm1.html
Psalm 1
Psalm 1
ancient-hebrew.org
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Ancient tomb door with stunning menorah carving revealed in Israel
By James Rogers | Fox News

As the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah comes to a close, the discovery of an ancient tomb door with a stunning menorah carving is providing a fascinating glimpse into Israel’s rich history.

The basalt tomb door, which is undergoing preservation work, was recently put on display by the Institute of Archaeology at Hebrew University, in Jerusalem.

The door was discovered in Tiberias in Israel’s Galilee region in 2010 by archaeologists from the University, but was only revealed to the public a few weeks ago, said Dr. Katia Cytryn-Silverman, senior lecturer at Hebrew University’s Institute of Archaeology and Department of Islamic and Middle East Studies.

Read more... http://www.foxnews.com/…/ancient-tomb-door-with-stunning-me…
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What is the meaning of "Jerusalem?"

The name ירושלם (pronounced yerushalam in Hebrew) is a combination of two words.

The first is yeru, which is the imperative form of the verb ירה (Y.R.H, Strong’s #3348), which means to “flow,” but used in a wide variety of applications. It can mean “flow” like the flowing of a river, “throw” as in flowing something, “point” as in flowing your finger in a particular direction or “teach” in the sense of pointing out a direction to go. meaning "flow".

The word shalam, derived from the verb שלם (Sh.L.M, Strong’s #7999) meaning complete and whole, means “completeness,” but often translated as “peace.”

When these two words are put together they mean something like "pointing the way to completeness" or “teach peace.”
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Survey Results: How did you find the AHRC?

Thank you to everyone who responded, I appreciate it. I also got a lot of comments in the survey about how much you appreciate the AHRC, again, thank you. I was also pleasantly surprised to hear that there were a number of you who have been following us for so long you couldn't remember how you found us, that is awesome
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Each letter in the Hebrew alphabet was originally a picture with meaning. In this video we will examine the letters in the Hebrew word שבת (shabbat) to uncover the meaning of this word based on its letters.
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Jews, Greeks, Gentiles and Proselytes: Who are they?
By Jeff A. Benner

As the gospel of Yeshua's message was spreading throughout the land, mostly documented in the book of Acts, three people groups are mentioned; the Jews, the Greeks and the Gentiles. Unfortunately due to misinterpretations and mistranslations of the text, there is a lot of misunderstanding over who these people are.


The Gentiles
The Greek word ethnos (Strong's #1484) literally means "nation." This word is used in the 2,000 year old Greek Septuagint to translate the Hebrew word goy (Strong's #1471), which also means "nation." A nation is any group of people living and working under one rule. Many different nations are mentioned in the Bible including; the Canaanites, Egyptians, Moabites, Arameans, and others. But more importantly even Israel is called a "nation."

Read more... http://www.ancient-hebrew.org/articles_thejews.html
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The next video in the Ancient Hebrew Alphabet sereis - Quph
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The next video in the Ancient Hebrew Alphabet series, the Tsade.
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The next video in the Ancient Hebrew Alphabet series.
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The next video in the Ancient Hebrew Alphabet series.
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