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30 years ago, on 23rd July 1985 at the Lincoln Centre in New York, Commodore unveiled the Amiga to the World.

Byte magazine called the Amiga 1000 “the first multimedia computer… so far ahead of its time that almost nobody—including Commodore's marketing department—could fully articulate what it was all about”.

To put this in perspective, when the Amiga was launched the IBM PC was using a 16 colour display and the Apple Macintosh was limited to black & white! The new Amiga 1000 had a 12-bit colour palette and was capable of displaying up to 4096 colours (HAM mode). The Amiga also had incredible stereo sound, providing 4 × 8-bit PCM audio channels.

The Amiga has since been rightfully recognised as the world’s first multimedia computer system.
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@esteban: Are you officially in the company Amiga Inc. or do you have a formal mandate to speak for them? Thx.
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The Amiga turns 30—“Nobody had ever designed a personal computer this way”

Ars Technica are also covering the Amiga’s 30th anniversary. Journalism is prone to hyperbole, but on July 23, 1985 technology genuinely changed forever. At New York's Lincoln Center, as a full orchestra scored the evening and all its employees appeared in tuxedos, Commodore unveiled the work of its newly acquired Amiga subsidiary for the first time. The world finally saw a real Amiga 1000 and all its features. A baboon's face at 640x400 resolution felt life-changing, and icons like Blondie's Debbie Harry and Andy Warhol came onstage to demo state-of-the-art technology like a paint program.

Today, Amiga—specifically its initial Amiga 1000 computer—officially turns 30. The Computer History Museum (CHM) in Mountain View, CA will commemorate the event this weekend (July 25 and 26) with firsthand hardware exhibits, speakers, and a banquet where the Viva Amiga documentary will be shown. It's merely the most high-profile event among dozens of Amiga commemorative ceremonies across the world, from Australia to Germany to Cleveland…
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+Karl Schütz The old girl needs feeding...
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The Amiga is 30 years old today. UK newspaper Metro have published a short retrospective and list their top 11 Amiga games.
The home computer that played host to everything from Speedball to Rainbow Islands hits the big 3-0, but which of its games still hold up today?
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The best thing in my life.
RIP Jay Miner, father of the GPU.
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Amiga 2000’s are still used to automate the air conditioning and heating throughout the Grand Rapids Public School district!
Think the Windows XP workstation you use at the office is ancient? It doesn't hold a candle next to what the Grand Rapids Public School district is using to con...
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10 of the Best Christmas Content and Easter Eggs in Games

Featured in this Top 10 is Christmas Lemmings for the Amiga, a holiday themed version of the game released as a demo and then later expanded into a full commercial release. Like the main game you had to stop small lemming creatures from walking to their death, but now they were dressed up as Santa with a variety of other festive decorations.
Easter eggs are hidden secrets in games that developers purposely put in for players to find, usually players find these themselves and then their location
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The Amiga 500 system was a perfect breeding ground for young aspiring game developers. It was accesible, relatively cheap, powerful for its time and had a very active following. This was especially true in northern Europe where many companies you know of today sprung from this era. The following blog post was written by a member of Gamasutra’s community :)
The Amiga 500 system was a perfect breeding ground for young aspiring game developers. It was accesible, relatively cheap, powerful for its time and had a very active following. This was especially true in northern Europe where many companies you know of today sprung from this era, ...
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Same question :)
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Powering up the past: Ars goes hands-on with the Amiga 500

Commodore's "Rock Lobster" brought low-cost 32-bit computing to the masses. Sean Gallagher, Ars Technica's IT Editor, takes his first look at the Amiga 500, and is seeking advice for using it in the 21st century!
Commodore's "Rock Lobster" brought low-cost 32-bit (sort of) computing to the masses.
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The plastic needs a severe restoration... there's ways to bring back that "fresh" out of the box color. I severely miss my Amiga :( #psychomikelo
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Commodore exhibition to show off rare Amiga prototypes

An event celebrating the Amiga's 30th birthday is gearing up to show off rare prototype versions of Commodore's iconic computer over the weekend.

Hosted at Silicon Valley's Computer History Museum, the "Amiga is 30" exhibition will feature the Ranger - Commodore West's follow-on to the A1000 - alongside Amiga Lorraine Prototype wirewrap boards…
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The Computer History Museum has released the source code to the 1986 version of Deluxe Paint.

Originally created by Dan Silva for Electronic Arts (EA), Deluxe Paint was quickly embraced by the Amiga community and became the de facto graphics (and later animation) editor for the platform, and by extension, game development. It was even used to create all the wall textures in Quake II.
Profesional Techniques for Deluxe Paint III [1989] (Re-Upload in One-Piece)
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From Bedrooms to Billions: The Amiga Years!

Please support this fantastic new documentary about how the Commodore Amiga helped influence a generation of Developers to take Video Gaming to a whole new level!
Nicola Caulfield & Anthony Caulfield is raising funds for From Bedrooms to Billions: The Amiga Years! on Kickstarter! How the Commodore Amiga helped influence a generation of Developers to take Video Gaming to a whole new level!
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Video: Ron Gilbert's postmortem of Maniac Mansion

While not an original Amiga game, Maniac Mansion was first developed for the Commodore 64 and later ported to the Commodore Amiga. The game was an innovator in many ways, and was one of the first graphical adventures to use a point and click interface.

Ron Gilbert and LucasArts are best remembered for The Secret of Monkey Island, but Ron says that Maniac Mansion is still his favourite project. The video of Ron Gilbert's presentation is available on Gamasutra for free, courtesy of the GDC Vault.
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Ola
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Why modern music owes a big debt to Japanese video games

The Commodore Amiga 500 also had a big impact on the European music scene thanks to the affordability of the Amiga, the Paula sound chip and some amazing Public Domain Sound Tracker apps.
"Oh man," says superstar hip-hop producer Just Blaze in episode four of Diggin’ in the Carts. "I don’t think Yuzo Koshiro was… he might have been Japanese descent, but I don’t think he grew up in...
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Octamed rocked!
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In their circles
75 people
Have them in circles
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pierre hallsten's profile photo
András Szabó's profile photo
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Welcome to the official Amiga Inc. Google page, your source for news and conversation about new and re-released classic Amiga games.
Introduction
Welcome to the official Amiga Inc. Google page, your source for news and conversation about new and re-released classic Amiga games.

Amiga, Inc. holds the intellectual property related to the AMIGA® personal computer that was developed and sold by Commodore International and Amiga Corporation, including hardware designs, software, operating systems, trademarks, and other intellectual properties.

Amiga, Inc. also produces and distributes enabling technologies and applications for wired and wireless devices that provide technology to developers for writing and porting applications to a new multi-media operating system that is hardware agnostic, enabling applications to run unchanged on various support platforms including Cell Phones, Tablets, Desktops, Set Top Boxes, and Digital Televisions.

Visit our website: www.amiga.com
Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/AmigaInc
Follow us on Google+: google.com/+amiga
Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/AmigaIncorporated

This is the official page for Amiga Inc. on Google+. We invite you to participate in the community of this page. Your opinions are important to us.
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