Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Melissa Alysania
Zero tolerance policy for racism/misogyny/bigotry. I cannot and will not continue to engage with people who are unable to be civil.
Zero tolerance policy for racism/misogyny/bigotry. I cannot and will not continue to engage with people who are unable to be civil.
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Tonight's mooring location. A++, would tie up here again.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
One Local Summer 2018 - Meal 1 #OneLocalSummer

Well, here we are with another One Local Summer coming upon us.  My local farmers market has already switched from their winter every-other-weekend schedule to every-weekend albeit still at the shorter, winter hours.  Last year, I dropped off blogging…
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The boys are back in towwwwnnnn! There's one lone drone in a sea of his sisters, but it's definitely a sign of spring. The hives kick out all the boys in the fall since they're a strain on hive resources and contribute nothing to the hive - they have no stinger to help defend the hive, and they don't tend to brood or forage for food. In the Spring, the queen begins laying unfertilized eggs to have boys on hand for mating purposes, but even a virgin queen from this hive is unlikely to mate with drones from her own hive. So, the drones are kept around for the good of honeybees as a whole, but not to directly benefit their own hive. Neat stuff!
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Sepia Saturday 412 #SepiaSaturday

Another Sepia Saturday!  This week’s theme image shows a woman and a dog, and hey, I have LOTS of photos of a boy and his dog!  The boy in question is my grandfather, Leon Kitko, and the dog here is actually named on the back of the photo as, “Tippy.” …
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Sepia Saturday 411 #SepiaSaturday

Our Sepia Saturday theme image this week featured a woman on her wedding day in 1928 in Canada.  Well, fortunately, I have photos of a wedding in 1927 in Canada that line up pretty well!  Above, we have Bessie Melita Creber on the left and her mother,…
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A local meadery, Haymaker Meadery, decided to run a fun competition among local beekeepers across three counties.  The idea was that beekeepers from Philadelphia, Chester, and Montgomery counties in Pennsylvania would bring in honey from their beehives…
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Sepia Saturday 410 #sepiasaturday

I kind of lost steam on these and miss nearly a year’s worth of Sepia Saturdays.  Things have been pretty upside down here, but I’d like to get back at these since I still have SO many photos from the family collections to share.  This week’s theme image…
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Well I sort of lost steam posting here.. we had five hives going into the winter - three 8 frame hives and two nucleus hives. The one big box we lost end of December with the crazy cold snap we had - that hive had been hard hit with varroa and wasn't in great shape, so when it got really cold, they starved out even though there was honey just the next frame over. They were just too small to move to the new food source. Good news though, the survivor hives are doing super well! We had a warm patch this week with temps up into the upper 60s and even above 70°F, so I had a chance to do a quick inspection. The girls are bringing home pollen from Silver Maples and Alder trees already (it seems wayyyyyyy too early), and here's video of them coming home! Super pleased to see them doing so well in spite of the pretty cold winter we've had.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I've been doing lots more reading this year, so I finally set up a goodreads account.
https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/75887637-alysania
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Just a quick video of a bee emerging from her cell!

While capped, the larva in the cell spins a cocoon while she undergoes metamorphosis from a larva into pupa, and finally an adult bee (much like butterflies). After 12 days in the capped cell, she chews her way out, dries her wings, and then tends to her first job which is cleaning and polishing down the walls of her former cell. The cocoons are really sticky stuff, so the bees leave them behind in the cells, but glue them to the walls. Over time, the cell walls get thicker and thicker until the cells are too small to hold developing larvae and properly sized bees - that's when the beekeeper steps in to remove those frames and replace them with fresh foundation. Brood foundation like this should last about three years after which it can be melted down for the wax.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded