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Melissa Alysania
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Melissa Alysania

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The theme for October’s Espionage Cosmetics Nexus shipment was, “Clever Girl,” which promised, “designs perfect for the adventurer gearing up for the ride of their lives through the age of the dinosaurs!”  I’d say they absolutely nailed it this month, and…
The theme for October’s Espionage Cosmetics Nexus shipment was, “Clever Girl,” which promised, “designs perfect for the adventurer gearing up for the ride of their lives thr…
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Melissa Alysania

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So, MAC has a makeup line for the 50th anniversary of Star Trek, in case any trek ladies (and dudes!) needed some awesomeness in their lives.
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I'm not sure I've heard this version of this song before, but I LOVE IT.
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Sepia Saturday 343-b #sepiaSaturday

Another one on the “Play” part of our Work and Play theme for this month – a little late, but better late than never, right?  I know I posted a class photo from Doede Jaarsma’s technical school before (here), so this is likely the same class on a day trip…
Another one on the “Play” part of our Work and Play theme for this month – a little late, but better late than never, right? I know I posted a class photo from Doede Jaarsma̵…
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It may not be the world’s most exciting meal, but it’s classic Chez Sheetar comfort food – meat and potatoes.  It was a quick and easy meal to make in the oven in one pan, and I get to show off the peach jam I made!  Our single little peach tree yielded…
It may not be the world’s most exciting meal, but it’s classic Chez Sheetar comfort food – meat and potatoes. It was a quick and easy meal to make in the oven in one pan, and I g…
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Today’s Sepia Saturday brings us a prompt image of men working on electrical lines.  It’s a really unique image, I think, and not something I had a perfect match for, but it does open the door to men working which lets me post a really neat series of…
Today’s Sepia Saturday brings us a prompt image of men working on electrical lines. It’s a really unique image, I think, and not something I had a perfect match for, but it does open t…
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That's weird.. that was from ages ago.. why did that repost now?!
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Local thing! I may have to go..
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Not quite. But close. 😉
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I posted this over on Instagram but I'll share it here too! Two honeys! Left is early summer, right is late summer. Same bees, different nectar sources.
See this Instagram photo by @alysania • 11 likes
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+Melissa Alysania when and if we decide to start keeping bees, I am totally picking your brain for information. :)

Hmmm. We need to work on the stroopwafel iron acquisition project. You know, the holiday season is just around the corner. If you leave out your wooden shoe in early December maybe you'll find one of these in it: https://smile.amazon.com/Palmer-Electric-Belgian-Cookie-Iron/dp/B000NRR7XI.
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Sepia Saturday 343-c #sepiasaturday

Yet another week of Sepia Saturday on the same theme, “Work and Play,” so for this week, I have a series of photos of my grandfather, Leon Kitko.  Leon was born in 1933, so he’s probably somewhere around 2 years old in this photo, or maybe just shy of 2 –…
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GIVE THEM WHATEVER THEY WANT. SERIOUSLY.
About 400 workers at the candy plant that makes marshmallow Peeps, Mike and Ike and Hot Tamales have walked off the job in protest after the company's latest contract offer.
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Oe noes!! 
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Another edition of our monthly theme starts this week, focusing on, “Work and Play.”  We’re allowed a good bit of leeway with the theme and prompt image so, since I have nothing at all in my collection like the prompt photo, I went with “Play” to start…
Another edition of our monthly theme starts this week, focusing on, “Work and Play.” We’re allowed a good bit of leeway with the theme and prompt image so, since I have nothing a…
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I love this picture of grandpa.
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Here's one from a few months ago that I never got a chance to talk about. The caught swarm (rear nuc) showed signs early on of double egg laying, and even double larvae in a single cell that you can see in the photos below. I love taking photos during inspections because sometimes you find things in the photos later that you might not have seen during the actual inspection - case and point here!

Our first thought was UH OH, laying worker, but usually laying workers deposit a dozen eggs in a single cell and they're usually not positioned in the center of the cell but stuck to the sides since a worker bee's abdomen isn't long enough to extend to the bottom of the cell like a queen's. Workers can only lay unfertlized eggs (drones) and usually only start laying once the colony has been queenless for an extended period of time. In the egg picture, you can see the cells around it have a single egg, perfecty centered, but the cell in the center of the photo has two eggs that are both attached to the bottom of the cell, fairly near the center.

After doing a little googling, I found a link to a snippet by Michael Bush (a pretty well-known and wise beekeeper)
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfallacies.htm#doubleeggs
Basically, young and inexperienced queens can be a little overzealous and sometimes lay two eggs in one cell. What we had with the swarm was a virgin queen who mated late (3-4 weeks from swarm catch to finding signs of eggs finally, due to a very rainy spring). I think this was exactly what happened in our case! This hive has since grown leaps and bounds, even giving up two frames of honey, so I think the last couple of months have proven that she's just a really committed queen who loves her job!

On to the larvae. Both eggs hatch and there are two larvae in a cell, and you can see that pretty clearly in the cell just right of center. You can't raise two bees in one cell, so one of the larvae, probably the weaker one, is removed by the nurse bees. Yes, bees cannibalize the young larvae. They'll also do this if their food supply runs short and they need the protein, or if they find larvae that are deformed, genetically inferior, or diseased. Sometimes they'll drag the carcass out of the hive, but most of the time, well, protein is protein.

And there you have it! An oddity of bee behavior that we came across this year. It's amazing how we're constantly learning new things about these little creatures!
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Knitter, Homebrewer, Photographer, Ingresser, LSGer, KOLer
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