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Akaroa Dolphins | Harbour Nature Cruises
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Dolphins / Penguins / Fur Seals / Dolphin Spotting Dogs / 100% locally owned and operated / Number 1 on TripAdvisor for Boat Tours in New Zealand /
Dolphins / Penguins / Fur Seals / Dolphin Spotting Dogs / 100% locally owned and operated / Number 1 on TripAdvisor for Boat Tours in New Zealand /

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Over the weekend we had the pleasure of hosting All Black great Ian Jones!
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Sunday's are for sleep-ins
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#PlasticFreeJuly Take the challenge, and refuse single-use plastic this July!

We have been plastic bag free here for over 6 months and continually looking for other ways to improve our eco-footprint.

Scientists now believe that by 2050, there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans, with Kiwis using around one billion lightweight plastic bags each year.

What can you do to reduce your single-use plastics this July? It can be as simple as packing reusable grocery bags into your car, taking your reusable coffee cup to your favourite coffee shop, refilling that water bottle or not buying pre-packed fruit & vegetables. #ChooseToRefuse
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The Hector's dolphins aren't renowned for jumping but when the do it is spectacular!!
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This beautiful bird is called a Tui and is native to New Zealand.

20 years ago, apart from the occasional sighting, the Tui had disappeared from Banks Peninsula. In 2007 a dedicated group started planning to bring the Tui back. In 2009 Tuis were released in Hinewai Reserve, with the hope of developing a successful breeding population.

Akaroa Dolphins has been part of the Tui Project sponsorship programme through the Banks Peninsula Conservation Trust since 2009. You are now able to hear their beautiful bird calls all over Akaroa.

To find out more go to http://www.bpct.org.nz/our-projects/tui-reintroduction.asp

Photo: Chalita Aommy Klumjui
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Why are the Hector's dolphins so special?

The Hector’s dolphin is endemic to the coastal waters of New Zealand. The Hector’s dolphin is only found around the South Island of New Zealand and is fragmented into three populations. They have a territorial range of 52 kilometres. Akaroa Harbour and Banks Peninsula host roughly 1000 of these dolphins.

There is also a sub-species called the Maui dolphin which is only found in the North Island. The Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins are related to a similar species in South Africa and South America.
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We are feeling very proud to have been awarded the Certificate of Excellence award for 2017. Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to review us!
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The Australian Tourist cruised with us over the weekend and shot this fabulous footage on a beautiful winter's day. Make sure you watch in HD.
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The Hector’s dolphin was named after Sir James Hector, who was the curator of the first Colonial Museum in Wellington (now named Te Papa). Sir James Hector examined the first dolphin specimen that was found. Sir James lived from 1834 to 1907, and was the most influential New Zealand scientist of his time.
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Adult Hector’s dolphins don’t often exceed 1.4 m in length and weigh between 40 and 60 kg. The males are slightly smaller and lighter than females. At birth, Hector’s dolphin calves have a total length of around 60-80 cm and weigh 8-10 kg.
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