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Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors
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The origins of the PTSD diagnosis stem from two dramatically different conceptualizations of its cause and symptoms. The psychological movement began in the 1790s and considered the syndrome to be primarily a mental one involving altered consciousness and amnesia, which later became known as dissociation: http://ct.counseling.org/2016/02/controversies-in-the-evolving-diagnosis-of-ptsd/
As promoters of human growth and development, counselors are in a unique position to be active participants in conversations and conceptualizations regarding posttraumatic stress disorder.
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If you had to endure a traumatic event, would you want to talk about your experiences later? Early models for treating trauma asked clients to do this, insisting that the cure was in the retelling. Just around the millennium, however, research began to show that, while some people were helped by going over the trauma again with a counsellor or other “de-briefer”, many others’ trauma symptoms were exacerbated by the insistence on going over the event. In the latest edition of our e-newsletter, we explore this idea through Briere’s “therapeutic window” model. Read it here: http://www.aipc.net.au/ezine
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New clinical practice guidelines advise physicians that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and second-generation antidepressants (SGAs), are equally effective treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults: http://psychcentral.com/news/2016/02/09/cbt-and-newer-meds-found-equally-effective-for-depression/98862.html
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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a psychological therapy designed to help prevent the relapse of depression, especially for those individuals who have Major Depressive Disorder (the principal type of depressive disorder defined by the DSM-5). MBCT employs traditional CBT methods and adds in mindfulness and mindfulness meditation strategies. In this article, we explore the mechanisms behind MBCT’s effectiveness in helping prevent relapse of depression: http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/mbct-a-look-at-the-mechanisms-of-action/
Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a psychological therapy designed to help prevent the relapse of depression, especially for those individuals who have Major Depressive Disorder (the principal type of depressive disorder defined by the DSM-5). MBCT employs traditional CBT methods and ...
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Despite a flurry of efforts to reduce bullying behavior, the practice is on the rise in the United States, especially in grades six through 10. A new University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) led study finds that one country appears to have an approach that works. UCLA researchers followed more than 7,000 students in 77 elementary schools in Finland and found that teaching bystanders to be more supportive appears to be the key: http://psychcentral.com/news/2016/02/03/reducing-bullying-by-teaching-bystanders-to-intervene/98607.html
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It’s a mistake to assume that burnout is merely an emotional response to long hours or a challenging job. Rather, mounting scientific evidence shows that burnout takes a profound physical toll that cascades well beyond our professional lives. Using cutting-edge techniques, integrative research teams are demonstrating that burnout is not just a state of mind, but a condition that leaves its mark on the brain as well as the body: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/observer/2016/february-16/burnout-and-the-brain.html
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Informally we speak of “burnout”, but rarely do we think of the absence of positive emotion as a problem distinct from depression. A wealth of research in the field of positive psychology tells us that emotional and physical well-being are important contributors to our health, productivity, and relationships. What happens when we cannot tap into happiness, fulfillment, energy, affection, and purpose? http://www.forbes.com/sites/brettsteenbarger/2016/01/28/how-to-light-the-fire-when-youre-burned-out
I was speaking with a portfolio manager at a large investment firm and something seemed amiss. As a psychologist who works with professionals in the finance industry on their performance, I listen not only to what people say, but how they say it. Everything the manager was saying made sense, [...]
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TV shows such as Hoarding: Buried Alive and Hoarders have brought hoarding disorder (HD) to a new level of public consciousness. The shows provide portraits of people who hoard, typically at a moment of crisis when they are on the brink of being evicted or having their houses condemned. Years of collecting “stuff” — much of which often has no monetary value — has narrowed their living space to a single room, part of a room or even just a place to sit: http://ct.counseling.org/2016/02/help-for-those-who-hoard/
Experts estimate that approximately 2 to 6 percent of the U.S. population has hoarding disorder.
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If I say a random string of numbers out loud, say 1593657292759381380473, how many of these numbers do you think you will be able to immediately remember? http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/ignoring-stuff-is-good-for-your-memory/
That's because a distracted brain is a forgetful brain
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What does it take to be an optimal human being? Throughout history there has been much speculation. Over the past 30 years or so, a number of contemporary psychologists have experimentally tested various aspects of previous theories, and are starting to get a clearer picture of those who seem to be well-integrated, thriving human beings: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/how-to-be-an-optimal-human/
Science-informed suggestions to help you have greater health, growth, and happiness.
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Nearly four decades of research has shown that intelligence is not fixed as scientists used to think; rather, people can develop their brains like a muscle if they put in the effort. People who do that – persisting despite obstacles – can be said to have a growth mindset rather than a fixed mindset and they enjoy significantly more success than their fixed-minded peers. In the latest edition of our e-newsletter we define and compare these two kinds of mindsets, and outline the benefits of developing a growth mindset. Read it here: http://www.aipc.net.au/ezine
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Australians, like Americans and their other Western counterparts, are living longer but suffering more chronic diseases. While the Australian boy born today can expect to live to 79.9 years and the Australian girl to 84 (the American statistic is similar), the odds are that they will be plagued by chronic illness, which will eventually kill them. Eighty percent of deaths in the United States now occur among persons age 65 years and older (Lyness, 2004). In this article, we explore some of the major losses which engender grief for those who are chronically or terminally ill. But before we begin our discussion, let’s define what we mean by “chronic”: http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/loss-and-the-chronic-or-terminally-ill/
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Australia’s largest provider of counselling courses including the Diploma of Counselling, Bachelor of Counselling and Graduate Diploma of Counselling.
Introduction
The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors (AIPC) is a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) and Higher Education Provider (HEP) that delivers counselling courses at vocational (Diploma of Counselling) and higher education (Bachelor of Counselling; Graduate Diploma of Counselling) levels to students throughout Australia and Overseas.

AIPC has a particular focus on flexible learning, through supported external and online training. AIPC is the largest provider of counselling courses in Australia, specialising in counsellor education for over twenty four years. Students graduate with a high level of knowledge and skill to perform competently in a variety of employment settings. Course structures focus on students learning a variety of approaches and enable students to develop progressively to a professional level; as well as grow personally as an individual.

AIPC courses are a journey of self discovery, providing students with a deep insight into why they think and behave as they do. Graduates are well prepared to pursue a career in counselling – employed or self-employed – enjoying strong industry reputation and linkage. All courses are accredited by the Australian Counselling Association (ACA).
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1800657667
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Locked Bag 15 Fortitude Valley QLD 4006 Australia