Profile

Cover photo
abdulkarriem khan
Works at Gerson Lehrman Group
Attended langston university
Lives in EBO region of BASV =BayAreaSiliconValley= Emeryville Berkeley Oakland
975 followers|343,960 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Pinned

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
 
#blackArtMatters  
beyoncé surprises the world with her most powerful album yet
Lemonade is a rich, layered and thought-provoking audio-visual extravaganza. It's here! Following last night's @HBO special, Beyoncé has dropped her sixth album Lemonade. It's available to stream exclusively on TIDAL, either as an hour-long visual album (which is what HBO premiered last night) or a 45-minute audio playlist consisting of 12 tracks. If you were hoping to be swamped with new Beyoncé, you won't be disappointed. TIDAL says the album is "based on every woman's journey of self-knowledge and healing," but Lemonade's narrative actually feels more specific than this as Bey spins a story of infidelity, despair and ultimately reconciliation. On a standout track calledSorry, Bey sings: "He only want me when I'm not there / He better call Becky with the good hair." It's a lyric that's destined to become one of the memes of 2016 as gossip sites tie themselves in knots trying to analyse whether Bey is telling us Jay-Z cheated on her. 
But as Formation (which closes the album) had suggested, Lemonade also feels thrillingly political and overtly feminist. The visual album features an except from a 1962 speech by Malcolm X in which the civil rights leader states: "The most disrespected person in America is the black woman. The most unprotected person in America is the black woman. The most neglected person in America is the black woman." It's surely no coincidence that Bey's co-stars throughout the visual album are mainly black and female, with Serena Williams, Zendaya, Amandla Stenberg, Chloe and Halle, Ibeyi and Quvenzhané Wallis all making guest appearances. The wonder of motherhood is also a recurring theme, with Bey telling us at one point: "Your mother is a woman and women like her cannot be contained."
Musically, the album contains Bey's most ambitious, varied and distinctive work yet. The Weeknd, Kendrick Lamar, James Blake and The White Stripes' Jack White all feature, and there are samples from tracks as diverse as Led Zeppelin's When the Levee Breaks, Yeah Yeah Yeahs' Maps and Soulja Boy Tell'em'sTurn My Swag On. The remarkable Daddy Lessons is Bey's first country song and Sandcastles is a stunning stripped-down ballad, while other tracks ricochet from gospel to rock, R&B to reggae. It's catchy too: Hold Up and Sorry especially already sound like radio hits.
Lemonade will take days to dissect properly because the music is so rich and the visual album contains an endless array of arresting images: Bey smashing up cars with a baseball bat, a braided Bey riding a horse, Bey on the floor playing an electric piano, Bey watching on as Serena Williams shows off her twerking skills. Look out too for some incredibly candid home video footage and a subtle endorsement of same-sex relationships towards the end. Bey also shows us where the album's title presumably came from by including a brief scene from the 90th birthday party of Hattie White, Jay-Z's grandmother. "I was served lemons but I made lemonade," White tells her friends and family. With Lemonade, Beyoncé has made her most powerful artistic statement yet, one that cements her status as one of the all-time great pop stars.
Credits
Lemonade is a rich, layered and thought-provoking audio-visual extravaganza.
3
1
Taikun E's profile photo
 
There is no bs. You tell me you cant make meeting. Then TE block you. That is mature? That is how b men in the bay deal with each other?You shows someone something. Then in 3 days thats all of the relationship? Short term thinking? Grow up. You gotta mature you thinking for TE. Step you level game up. Black bias and discrimination exists and you are proof of that. And need to reset you thinking and frame of mind. Thinking long term. Not short term. You cannot tell me with straight face. That you dont sound ridiculous. Make sure I feel you in words. TE won this. 1 - 0.
Add a comment...

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
 
One of the lone positives from the Bears' 3-13 season was Jerrell Freeman, who was graded as the NFL's No. 1 inside linebacker, according to PFF.
1
Add a comment...

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The Statue of Liberty was initially a African woman with broken chains on her hands and feet symbolizing our freedom from slavery but of course the US wasn't going for it. However the statue today has the broken chains at the feet of it if u ever wonder why those chains were there.
4 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
 
First, it beat Star Wars: Rogue One. Now, for the second weekend since its wide-release debut, Hidden Figures—the true story of three black female mathematicians at NASA—is number one at the box office. It’s raked in roughly $6o million so far, and counting.

The inspiring story of Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson, and Dorothy Vaughan has reenergized the ongoing conversation about the importance of inclusivity in STEM. Though we’ve long done away with the Jim Crow laws depicted in Hidden Figures, black women in are still notoriously underrepresented in mathematical sciences, including physics. A quick look at the numbers proves it: between 1973 and 2012, 22,172 white men received PhDs in physics. Only 66 black women did.

Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein was one of those women.


Image Credit: GR21 LOC
In 2010, Prescod-Weinstein became the 63rd black American woman to ever earn a PhD in physics, from the Perimeter Institute at the University of Waterloo in Canada. Now, as a theoretical astrophysicist who’s worked at MIT and, more recently, the University of Washington, she is an advocate for black women and non-binary people in STEM.


A self-described modern day “hidden figure,” Gizmodo caught up with Prescod-Weinstein to talk about being a black woman in a white man’s field, and to get her take on the box office sensation Hidden Figures.

Gizmodo: What are you currently working on? What projects in your career are you most proud of?

Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein: As far as things that I’ve accomplished at MIT, working on a paper that looked at how axions could form and condensate on an astrophysical scale...that was really fun. I really like that paper of mine.

If I think about everything I’ve worked on in my career, there was only one thing I wasn’t really excited about, or one paper that I felt kind of “meh” about. Even for that particular paper, I would say the question we were trying to answer was an important question—it just wasn’t one that set my heart aflutter.

I think to be able to continue doing this kind of work, especially if you are someone who is overcoming various forms of discrimination, you need to be excited about what you’re working on. Otherwise, the discrimination isn’t worth it.

Gizmodo: What were some of your initial thoughts after watching Hidden Figures?

Prescod-Weinstein: I actually haven’t seen [the movie] yet, but I’ve talked to people about it extensively—I have the book. I wrote the introduction for a young adult book that was co-written by Duchess Harris, who is the granddaughter of Miriam Mann, who is one of the people in the book.

So I’m very familiar with the story.


Image Credit: 20th Century Fox
Gizmodo: Much of the movie centers around how Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson, and Dorothy Vaughan were repeatedly discriminated against by their white male (and female) colleagues. Were there points in your career where you experienced similar incidences of racism and sexism?

Prescod-Weinstein: I’ve written extensively about this on my blog, but I think there’s a recurring theme. There were times when I was treated differently in overt ways because of my race and my gender. [Even with] some of my classmates at Harvard—some of my classmates who went on to study physics with me—it was very clear to me during the prospective students weekend that they thought the only way someone like me could have gotten into Harvard was because of affirmative action.

Before I had even started as a college freshman, it had been made clear to me that some of my classmates didn’t believe that I was there for my own merit, and they had no basis for that. They hadn’t been in a classroom with me, they didn’t know that my math teacher had written in my letter of recommendation that in his 30 years of teaching, I was the most talented mathematician that he had ever taught.

I think one of the things that’s hard about racism—about discrimination in general—is that if you grow up in American society, by the time you’re an adult, you basically have a PhD in identifying racism, because you’ve experienced it so much. You’ve been around it so much.

When I started high school—the high school I ended up graduating from—I started a month late, because my parents were divorced, and I was with one instead of the other. As a 13-year-old ninth-grader who just skipped a grade, I was already ready to take Algebra II, which is usually an 11th or 12th grade course. So I got put in an Algebra II course, and the math teacher there—who ended up being my only math teacher in high school—said, “There’s no seat for you in this class. You can’t be in this class.”

“If you grow up in American society, by the time you’re an adult, you basically have a PhD in identifying racism, because you’ve experienced it so much.”
I went to my counselor, and my counselor wasn’t there, so I went to my vice principal’s office. And the vice principal—who was black—looks at me and says: “Okay, I guess I will put you in the Algebra II Honors class, because I know there are enough seats in that class.” He walked me over to my counselor’s office—she was a white woman—and she looked at him and said in front of me, “There’s no way she can do this course.”

Do I know that she said it because I was black or because I was a girl? No. But if you talk to black women and white women, black men and white scientists, there’s a pattern: those of us who are black women have heard these things more frequently.

Gizmodo: A study from the National Science Foundation reports that between 1973 and 2012, 22,172 white men have received physics PhDs. In that same time frame, 66 Black women have received physics PhDs. You’ve tweeted about these statistics before, but how do the numbers make you feel?

Prescod-Weinstein: I know I’m not supposed to say this, but like shit.



When I say it makes me feel like shit, I mean that every time someone asks me about that number, I have to suppress tears. For me, that’s a very emotional thing, because speaking of Hidden Figures, it’s a hidden statistic. It’s not talked about. I think the only reason it’s been talked about in the press at all over the last few years is because I wrote that one tweet and it got some people’s attention.

I think it brings up a lot of stuff for me. In addition to reminding me of all the experiences of isolation that I had as a graduate student, the experiences my mentees had as graduate students or the ones who are still in graduate school continue to have, it also reminds me of all the conversations I’ve had with people who are working on “diversity.”

“The idea of being supervised by a black woman who is already tenured faculty and working in my field is actually literally impossible”
When I’ve tried to highlight to [these people] how few black women were earning PhDs specifically in physics—but also in astrophysics and related fields—they’ve said to me things like, “I don’t see why race matters.”

I heard that as a graduate student, when I was more actively involved in some aspects of the National Society of Black Physicists leadership, interacting with some of the people at our so-called “sister societies,” and getting the feedback that people didn’t think we were worth focusing on because there weren’t enough of us. That’s a value statement.

I don’t know if I have words to describe what it’s like to have people make you invisible because you are already so invisible. And for them to say, “You’re already non-existent, so let’s not talk about how non-existent you are.” It doesn’t even make sense, but it’s also extremely psychologically painful.

Gizmodo: In that sense, do you feel the title of Hidden Figures resonates with you personally?

Prescod-Weinstein: Absolutely. I absolutely think that we are hidden. I think that what people seeing the movie or reading the book may not realize is that we’re hidden because there are so few of us, but that even in today’s diversity discourse, we are often hidden because of weird statistical arguments and the politics of the diversity community, which I think often unfortunately errs on the side of focusing on what are the needs of people engaging in diversity work rather than “what are the needs of the people diversity work is intended to serve.”

Gizmodo: Do you think Hidden Figures is a movie about history, or a critique about the current state of science?

Prescod-Weinstein: I think too often in the national conversation about race, we tend to be very linear in terms of how we think about historical progress—that if things were bad in the 1960s, that they must be the same or better now. I think that this is complicated and nonlinear in significant ways. The group in Hidden Figures worked as a group, they knew other black women mathematicians at work—I have never worked with another black woman on a research project and until fairly recently, I didn’t even have the opportunity to.

Until last March, I had never been supervised by a woman. My current post-doc advisor is the first woman research advisor that I’ve ever had. I’m six years out from my PhD and that’s how long it took for me to work with another woman, and she’s white.

“So one of my anxieties about [Hidden Figures] is that people will walk away from it and situate it in the 1960s, not 2017.”
The idea of being supervised by a black woman who is already tenured faculty and working in my field is actually literally impossible, basically.

Just to give context to that, someone posted in a Facebook group recently—a black woman— that she was “so excited” to write a tenure letter for a fellow black woman and to give her a strong recommendation. And while that’s fantastic, there will be no black women writing tenure support letters for me. But I now add to my bucket list that one day, I can write a tenure support letter for a black woman who is junior to me. That’s one of my professional goals now.

So one of my anxieties about [Hidden Figures] is that people will walk away from it and situate it in the 1960s, not 2017. They won’t realize that the last black American woman to get a PhD in theoretical cosmology left the field immediately upon graduation from her PhD program. I think the story is different now—not because things are better, just different.

Gizmodo: How can we make science a more inclusive space?

Prescod-Weinstein: I think that the press has a very big role to play in this. Over the last few years, after my interview with The Huffington Post went public, I started getting letters from people saying, “I didn’t know someone like you existed. I’m going to tell my kids about you.”

One of my frustrations about [the coverage surrounding Hidden Figures] is that the press hasn’t gone adamantly after the black women mathematical scientists of today. I do think that we were starting to hear about black women who are engineers or in a lab...but I want kids to know there are also black women who do calculus all day and even fit the stereotype of the old white man with lots of papers who is walking into things. That’s occasionally me.

One of the things we can do is, in the celebratory storytelling of these incredible women, that we not forget that children and young adults need modern examples that they can relate to in a more day-to-day way.

I want for the young women and non-binary people and men out there to have what I did not have; I did not know about any black women working in physics when I was a high school student. A thing that’s very exciting for me is that I can be that person for someone else. And that enriches my work.
Rae Paoletta@payoletter
Space Writer, Gizmodo
First, it beat Star Wars: Rogue One. Now, for the second weekend since its wide-release debut, Hidden Figures—the true story of three black female mathematicians at NASA—is number one at the box office. It’s raked in roughly $6o million so far, and counting.
1
Add a comment...

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
 
What the +Chicago Bears FanPage can learn from +NFL playoffs run 25+ x a games & draft a QB 2 get in playoffs & win 
As the NFL wrapped up the first week of playoff action, John "Moon" Mullin breaks down the main takeaways for the Bears.
1
Add a comment...

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
2
Add a comment...

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

abdulkarriem khan

Shared publicly  - 
 
C @DougMcDermott 31 @CSNChicago Highlights from @ChicagoBulls ' win over Grizzlies http://www.csnchicago.com/video/general/bulls?guid=B44AB3AB-7349-9913-05DE-A5BA2FCA0615&t=57
1
Add a comment...
abdulkarriem's Collections
Collections abdulkarriem is following
View all
Work
Occupation
Cloud , Mobile & Social Network $ Expert GLGroup.com & http://Basn.org
Employment
  • Gerson Lehrman Group
    Expert, 2008 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
EBO region of BASV =BayAreaSiliconValley= Emeryville Berkeley Oakland
Previously
emeryville, CA - Berkeley, CA - Oakland, CA - Chicago, CA - Leesville, Louisiana - Port Elizabeth, South africa - langston, oklahoma - washington, DC - Los Angeles, CA
Contact Information
Home
Phone
510-228-4325
Mobile
5102284325
Address
if You know U dont tell if u say U don't know ;-) Silicon Valley Bay
Story
Tagline
The Birth of Web D3 http://thebirthofwebd3.blogspot.com/2008/01/birth-of-web-d3_05.html How do we solve the Problems of Exponential Data Growth, Server-Client Architecture Scaling Performance limits, and Users need not Just For Data & ID Portability but Control of their Data.This Growth in Users from Platforms without direct File-system access (IPhone, Wii, Web-enabled TV's, Internet Kiosks etc..) has led to the slow Bloat of Web 2.0.
Introduction
Founding Negus of the #Latinum Trade Federation! Cloud, Mobile & Social$ Expert http://GLGroup.com  Screener & Angel http://BASN.org  C my http://klout.com/AK2WebD3 & Tweetreach between 50-500,000 for every 50 Tweets  http://tweetreach.com/reach?q=ak2webd3 2C #WebD3Crew @RW http://bit.ly/KPY4QR  GV 5102284325 SMS1st@
 I am a shy quiet introverted person at heart, who because of the
decisive roles that have been thrust upon me by the leadership 
responsibilities that come with my position in my family, community,
and businesses has developed an interactive, inspirational demeanor.I am focused and charismatic in my interactions with others with the goal of everyone  benefiting (Myers-Briggs INTJ to ENTJ). This is based upon the reality that everything & everyone has a potential for Good & Harm. Average Leaders can get the good from Good people, Good Leaders get the good from Average people, Great leaders have to be able to get good out of all including Harmful People & minimize their Harm. Im Half South African and African American I combine the best of the  Motherland with the Best of America. There's a New Sheriff (Sharrief) in Town. 

Someone Always makes $ money in Every Economy! Don't go for the Hype! Find the Side of the Balance sheet where you can Bring Value by Solving A PAIN POINT while MAKEing & SAVEing Money for your Customers or Strategic Partners in the Process!!! Because "Fortune Favors the Bold" - Captain Sisko Star Trek Deep Space 9 & Henry V

Civilization is based upon five things; the Wisdom of the Knowledgeable, the Generousity of the Wealthy, the Justice of the Mighty, the Prayers of the Pious, and The Chivalry of the Brave.-Quote From the Time of Baibars http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baibars &http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mamluk 

This is based upon the reality that everything & everyone has a potential for Good & Harm. Average Leaders can get the good from Good people, Good Leaders get the good from Average people, Great leaders have to be able to get good out of all including Harmful People & minimize their Harm. AK*2 (ME ;-)

A king may move a man. A father may claim a son. But remember that even when those who move you be kings or men of power...your soul is in your keeping alone. When you stand before God you cannot say But I was told by others to do thus or that virtue was not convienent at that time. This will not suffice. Remember that. Be without fear in the face of your enemies. Be brave and upright that God may love thee. Speak the truth always, even if it leads to your death. Safeguard the helpless and do no wrong - that is your oath. Safeguard the helpless, that is your oath! [smack!] And that is so you remember it. Rise a knight! RISE A KNIGHT!! http://www.moviequotes.com/repository.cgi?pg=3&tt=304790
Bragging rights
Video Monetization: ( I suggested the $1 a song Price model to Apple for Itunes & a proposed Iphone Spec., while consulting with them @ http://marketsource.com ). See Breakout: Music Artists Go Entrepreneurial http://alwayson.goingon.com/page/display/27420?param=session/266 . See the Mobile $ Preso I did @ http:/svwebbuilder.com & http://tipsgroup.com sponsored http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/521382 •Mobile: (With http://marketsource.com Helped Nokia sucessfully connect with Mobile Professionals in the Real Estate Industry by changing the Solution emphasis & Asset aquisition Strategy. & Won the Contract over Ernst & Young to write the whitepaper outlining the Strategy for Telecom). •Viral monetization: (Contributed Strategy & Technology to the winning Google Opensocial Strategy that 3x their user base in a Year). •Network Engineering & Server Intergation: Troubleshot & Brought Online (When Know one Else Could) Multi-Technology Streaming Video & Cutting-edge Content Delivery System that received a 6 Figure $ Cisco grant to help build the Cisco Regional Lab that Supported all their Central California Regional academies; a 5-6 figure User base). • Screener for http://basn.org (Bay Area Startup Network (BASN) & their US Angel Investors Inc.
Education
  • langston university
    Computer Science, 1987 - 1988
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
May 11
Relationship
Single