Profile cover photo
Profile photo
ZuriMED Technologies AG
4 followers -
Disruptive Innovation on ACL Reconstruction
Disruptive Innovation on ACL Reconstruction

4 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Meet ZuriMED at Bio International Convention on 15-18 June 2015 in Philadelphia, US

Find our booth at:
http://www.mapyourshow.com/shows/index.cfm?Show_ID=bio15&exhid=00456342&booth=801&hall=A
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
ZuriMED Technologies » Dr. Xiang Li won the Venture Leaders Prize 2015


The Swiss National Startup Team ready to conquer the USA.
20 new entrepreneurs and startups forming the 2015 venture leaders USA team are on their way to global expansion. 
The winners of the venture leaders USA 2015 prize have been chosen after a highly competitive selection process, among Switzerland’s most promising startups. More than a 100 of them applied. The 20 high-tech startups forming the “Swiss National Startup team” will travel to Boston and New York in June for an intense 10 days entrepreneurial business development trip, organized in partnership with swissnex Boston. With the 15th edition of the program, Swiss innovation continues to demonstrate its potential for global expansion thanks to high-tech products such as a revolutionary device for surgical knee ligament reconstruction, a smart digital insurance manager or a wearable biometrics solution based on vein recognition.


View more at:
http://www.venturelab.ch/index.cfm?CFID=425643724&CFTOKEN=21825566&page=132995&article_id=1801
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Interview with Prof. Jess Snedeker about the ZuriMED solution for ACL reconstruction – «Wissen in 20 Minuten»

ZÜRICH. Eine gefürchtete Folge nach einem Skiunfall ist ein gerissenes Kreuzband. Diese Knieverletzung erleiden in der Schweiz jährlich mehr als 6000 Menschen. In vielen Fällen hilft nur eine Operation, bei der anstelle des kaputten Bandes ein Stück einer Beinsehne verpflanzt wird. Damit diese rascher einwächst, kann sie zusätzlich mit kleinen Knochenteilen verankert werden. Dafür musste bisher ein Knochenstück aus der Kniescheibe ausgesägt werden – was die Heilung nach der Operation sehr schmerzhaft machte.

Eine schonendere Methode haben nun Forschende der ETH und Uni Zürich gefunden: Sie entwickelten ein Implantat aus synthetischem Knochenmaterial, welches die ausgesägten Stücke ersetzen kann. «So ist die Operation nun ohne zusätzliche Schmerzen möglich», sagt ETH-Biomechaniker Jess Snedeker. Bereits im Herbst 2015 soll das neue Implantat auf den Markt kommen. SRU
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
BTB-Conversion-Kit™ by ZuriMED® Technologies

Surgical animation
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
People behind Swiss Innovation

A revolutionary device for surgical knee ligament reconstruction

The likelihood of severe post-operative pain that comes with the use of a highperformance “bone-tendon-bone” (BTB) autograft for knee ligament reconstruction leads many knee surgeons to elect for the less painful, but lower performance “hamstring” tendon autograft. ZuriMED’s device effectively “converts” the less painful tendon graft into a BTB-like autograft (“functional gain, without the pain”).
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Elegant solution for the knee | ETH Zurich

Elegant solution for the knee
10.12.2014 | Martina Märki | Research
A torn anterior cruciate ligament is the most common clinically relevant knee injury. Every year, more than 6,000 people are affected in Switzerland alone. Current treatment methods, although numerous, often produce inadequate results. A new implant could provide the answer.

A doctor identifies the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee. Researchers of ETH Zurich and University Hospital Balgrist developed a new implant for the treatment of torn ligaments. (Photo: istockphoto)
He doesn’t really like the sight of blood, Jess Snedeker confesses, at least not on TV. But as an orthopaedic biomechanics specialist and a professor at both ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, he is frequently in the operating theatre with his team – watching as surgeons at Balgrist University Hospital handle problems of the locomotor system, one of the hospital’s specialist areas. Perhaps it is because Snedeker’s lab is also located in one of the hospital buildings that he has been able to build such a good working relationship with its staff. “That’s extremely important to us”, the engineer explains, because crucial insights into developing a medical implant or instrument often come from direct observation. Take the centimetre-long, plug-like object lying on the table, for instance: it is about to be patented and then put to good use by thousands of knees following operations on torn cruciate ligaments.
Painful bone saws
There are a variety of methods to treat torn cruciate ligaments. Usually, the body’s own tendons are transplanted, but not all tendons are equally suitable for this purpose. And it is important to attach them securely to the bone – with screws, for example – so that they can withstand the tremendous forces exerted on the knee. Patients commonly face the problem of the graft loosening in the first few weeks after surgery because it doesn’t implant quickly enough. In this case, the knee has not been stabilised sufficiently despite the surgery.
The most successful method to date involves replacing the torn ligament with a graft from the patellar tendon, as surgeons can remove the latter together with pieces of bone attached at both ends. Using these bone plugs, they fix the tendon to its new location via holes pre-drilled into the bone. The bone plugs grow in rapidly and stably. The drawback of this technique, however, is the fact that it is very painful to saw out the bone plugs from their original location, and the sites where they have been removed remain painful long after the operation.
Promising bone substitute

Scheme of the new knee implant. (Graphics: Courtesy Prof. Jess G. Snedeker)
Snedeker and his team have now developed a graft that replaces bone plugs and screws with an anchor that is partly composed of synthetic bone material. It is inserted in the same way as a bone plug. Thanks to the synthetic bone material, the anchor grows into the bone just as quickly as an organic bone plug. This allows the tendons to grow into the bone very effectively without actually having to remove any bone plugs. “This means we can spare the patients a lot of pain”, says Snedeker. Moreover, the method saves on the amount of time spent in the operating theatre and so also saves money – an important factor, especially from the perspective of the insurance companies.
One of the challenges of this development project consisted in combining the chalky synthetic bone material with a more stable material so that it wouldn’t crumble, even when subjected to a lot of stress. The shape also needed to be ergonomic in order to make it as straightforward and intuitive as possible for surgeons to use. As Snedeker explains, developing an implant like this might have been possible even if his team weren’t directly affiliated with a hospital, but “the surgeons are our best critics. If they find our instruments useful, we can venture onto the market with confidence.”
The new implant is due to be launched on the market in autumn 2015. Snedeker’s colleague Xiang Li is currently in the process of founding a spin-off, ZuriMED. Both Li and Snedeker are optimistic about the market prospects: “We expect to sell around 20,000 implants in five years.” This nascent spin-off has gotten advice from the University of Zurich’s technology transfer office and ETH Zurich’s ieLab, which brings together talented young entrepreneurs from ETH Zurich, experienced figures from the business world and alliance partners from industry. “We are especially looking for Swiss industrial partners for the production side of things”, says Snedeker. With such a standout project, the chances look good.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Events | Embassy of the United States Bern, Switzerland

Ambassador LeVine meets with Pioneer Fellows of ieLAB – Innovation and Entrepreneurship, at the ETH in Zurich

October 27, 2014


Ambassador LeVine discussing technology transfer at the ieLAB - innovation and entrepreneurship - at the ETH in Zurich
On Monday, October 27, Ambassador LeVine visited the ieLAB for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the ETH in Zürich. After a general presentation on what the ETH does to support technology transfer and to help young entrepreneurs to start their own company, three Pioneer Fellows of the ieLAB presented their spin-offs: Parquery, an app for finding parking spaces for cars, rqmicro for rapid testing of water and food pathogen, and ZuriMed , a bone-to-bone conversion kit used for reconstruction of ligaments. The meeting was joined by Prof. Roland Siegwart, VP Research and Corporate Relations, Jürg Brunnschweiler, Director Global Institutional Affairs, Peter Seitz, former Managing Director ieLAB and Marjan Kraak, who is responsible for life sciences at ieLAB.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded