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Zuleyka Zevallos
7,922 followers -
Applied sociologist
Applied sociologist

7,922 followers
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Women in Tech
While the number of women in other sciences has equalised at the junior levels, the number of women in senior roles remains under 20% for all science, technology and maths – or STEM – areas. Some disciplines do better than others. Engineering and computer science degrees have actually become worse since the 1980s, despite the boom in these industries. While women make up around 60% of women undergraduate students in the life sciences, women make up only 16% of Bachelor-level students in information technology degrees.

When we’re thinking about the academic workforce, at the postgraduate levels, it gets slightly more promising, with 27% of IT students completing a PhD being women, but this still pales in comparison to their male counterparts. The proportion drops again amongst senior IT academics, with only 16% of professors being women (34 women, compared to 174 men).

Thinking about the situation outside academia, women make up around 46% of the entire Australian workforce, but less than one third of employees in technology roles. To be more concrete, computer system design was the top industry employing men in 2016 (122,500 men), but women only make up a quarter of this same industry (40,348 women or 24.8%). The gender pay gap in tech is improving incrementally, however the disparity is still alarming, and the lack of diversity in tech is seen by industry leaders as a ‘crisis.’

Structural reform
Initiatives that work most effectively are focused on changing institutions, especially workplace culture. For example, creating a diversity task force that includes executives and managers who have clear goals and key performance indicators that they are examined against. It's also useful to continually measure, address and evaluate proactive steps to battle inequality.

Targets and quotas are also important because they work to increase diversity, and, in turn, lead to greater profit and productivity.

Questions to ensure inclusion of White women and minorities might include:

➡️Do people from underrepresented backgrounds feel welcome?
➡️Is the culture hostile to White women and minorities?
➡️What concrete steps will companies take to do things differently based on staff feedback?

Valuing women’s diversity
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and other minority women of colour need sponsors. They need advocates who can link them in with extensive job networks, and who will actively make introductions that might lead to new career opportunities.

There are other useful tips for making workplaces more supportive of people with caring responsibilities. For example, actively promoting flexibility and work/life balance. Does the workplace have core hours that are useful for carers? For example, a standing rule that no important meetings happen before 9.30am or after 3.30pm.

Making sure that all calendar time spots before 9am and after 5pm are greyed out has been shown to significantly reduce people scheduling unnecessary meetings and working overly long hours. This also makes for a more family-friendly workplace.

For references and other tips, head to my blog: https://othersociologist.com/2018/07/01/women-in-tech/

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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please read my blog post.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#womeinstem #womeninscience #women #genderequity #intersectionality #womenintech #stemwomen #inclusion #diversity #sociology #australia

[Image: drawing of a Black woman laughing with a White woman. Overlaid is a quote: Organisations eagerly invest in the latest technologies and update their systems to stay ahead of the game. Why don't they invest in women's potential in the same way]
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How to Support Equity and Diversity in Academic and Science Events
Diversity encompasses issues of equity, inclusion, accessibility and intersectionality (the interconnection between gender and racial inequality alongisde other social disadvantages). I've created a resource to ensure academic and science events support diversity. Below is a brief version, read the full guide on my website.

Equity
Equity is a concept illustrating ways to identify barriers, issues and solutions to structural disadvantage. To challenge equity issues when we organise academic and science events (and other types of public debates and protest), we should start by asking ourselves: who should lead?

Some tips for thinking critically about equity and leadership include these considerations:

✅ Leadership should reflect and reinforce diversity
✅ Centre Indigenous leadership
✅ Recruit other people of colour
✅ Bring in disability experts
✅ Ensure lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA) representation, especially transgender people.

Inclusion
Inclusion is about actively seeking out, valuing and respecting differences.

For individuals wishing to address inclusion, some initial things to address:

✅ Publish clear equity and diversity statement at event launch
✅ Regularly promote anti-harassment policies
✅ Address safety for the event, especially for minorities
✅ Craft an inclusive communication strategy, including for social media.

Access
Access is about creating, measuring and redesigning opportunities to enhance participation by underrepresented groups.

When should you address issues of access for your academic science event? From the first day of planning to the day of the event, demonstrate active commitment!

✅ Disabled experts must have decision-making power
✅ Accessibility planning prior to venue choice
✅ Consider timing of activities, rest stops, quiet areas and other needs.

Intersectionality
The concept of intersectionality addressses how gender and racial inequalities are interconnected (Crenshaw 1989). This interrelationship of disadvantage in turn compounds other forms of social exclusion related to sexuality, disability, class, age, and so on. Intersectionality is central to understanding why science is not an even playing field.

Having a strong understanding and application of intersectionality will enable event organisers to:

✅ Actively manage diversity to ensure everyone feels safe, welcome and represented
✅ Proactively lead on structural inequities
✅ Address the issues affecting underrepresented academics and scientists as part of core business.

Learn More
Read more tips and download posters of these graphics via my research blog: http://bit.ly/equitydiversitysci

Accessibility: read descriptions of the graphics/poster also on my blog.

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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please the article.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#sociology #socialscience #womeninscience #womeninstem #antiracism #events #research #academia #stemwomen #intersectionality
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Decolonising Space
I was interviewed by Newsweek on the inequalities embedded into the way people imagine colonising other planets:

'“Language is one of the ways in which we shape our social reality,” Zuleyka Zevallos, a sociologist at Swinburne University in Australia, told Newsweek. That means using terms like colonize carries real risks. “The history of colonialism has taught us that there is no democratic way to colonize other lands,” she said. “It is about profit, and profit always marginalizes minorities.”'

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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please the article.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#sociology #socialscience #history #antiracism #decolonisation #research #academia #science
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Making Science Inclusive
I’ll be on a panel at the Science Pathways conference on 23 April 2018, in Brisbane.* The event is run by the EMCR Forum (Australia’s Early- and Mid-Career Researcher Forum). I will speak about how to use intersectionality to refocus diversity initiatives to be more inclusive. A description of the panel from the conference website:

Discussions around how to improve diversity in science are often centred on ways to encourage those from underrepresented demographics to consider career paths in STEM. To ensure success, these well-intentioned initiatives need to be underpinned by effective policy and ongoing support to ensure individuals are given an equal opportunity to thrive. In this session, the concept of inclusive science will be explored from the perspective of EMCRs, with examples of best practice from academia and industry.

More on the conference: https://goo.gl/ryg7QR

If you can’t make it, you will be able to watch it free on livestream! Register here: https://goo.gl/w5atso
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Barangaroo and the Four Thousand Fish
Four Thousand Fish was a public artwork that celebrates the enduring legacy of a strong Aboriginal woman, Barangaroo. She was a Cammeraygal fisherwoman of the Eora nation, who defied colonialism in Gadigal, her homeland (also known as Sydney). The public was invited to create ice fish which are then placed into a canoe and set alight each weekend evening of the Sydney Festival.

Fisherwomen
Cammeraygal fisherwomen held central roles as the primary providers for their people. Over millenia, they perfected fishing from their bark canoes (nawi) with lines and hooks. They fished sustainably, only catching what they needed each day.

The British invaded Australia in 1788, decimating the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations. Of those who survived, many were raped, enslaved or kidnapped.

In 1790 British colonists plundered four thousand salmon fish in one day. These fish were presented to Barangaroo's husband, Bennelong, and other Eora men by the British male officers as a way to establish authority. This was the beginning of environmental damage that continues to this day, and also diminishing women’s status as the main food providers for family and community. Barangaroo refused to meet with the British, to wear colonists’ clothes, and to accept the displacement of Eora women.

Celebrating Barangaroo
For this public artwork, you begin on the walk towards Barangaroo, where beautiful fish stickers are placed along the pleasant 15 minute walk from the edge of the city to the foreshore site. On arrival, you pick up a bucket and fill it with water. Then you walk to the undercover area, taking care not to spill your water along the brief five-minute walk.

Once inside, you are given a fish mould, where you will pour your water. You are invited into one of two giant freezers to place your fish mould, which you deliver and store into a set of shelves. The water will turn cold and solidify, and become someone else’s fish, later that night.

Having replenished the stock, you are free to take someone else’s fish that is already frozen. The frozen fish is now yours to tend. Place it into your now-empty bucket carefully.

It’s time to walk back outside, to where you first collected the water. You take your frozen fish and place it with love onto the pile. It joins hundreds of other frozen fish, entrusted by other happy members of the public.

The frozen fish are housed in a giant canoe. You will hear the voices of Aboriginal experts and elders talking about the central role of Barangaroo’s leadership, and the valiance of women who fought in battle against the colonisers.

When the sun begins to doze off, the frozen fish are slowly melted, as a fire is lit, to commemorate the bravery of Barangaroo, whose story should be known by one and all.

Read more on my blog: https://othersociologist.com/2018/04/07/barangaroo-four-thousand-fish/

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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please read my blog post.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#sociology #socialscience #aboriginal #indigenous #australia #women #history #art
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Tech Inclusion
I participated in the Tech Inclusion conference in Melbourne, on the panel titled, “We’ve got a time machine, now what are we going to do with it?” UX designer Danya Azzopardi and I were in conversation with our host, UX lead designer for ANZ, Cory-Ann Joseph. Cory began by asking us how we felt about the current state of diversity and inclusion in Australia and what we might do to improve these practices.

I noted that while people want to be positive about progress, the numbers tell a less optimistic story. At the senior level there are few women, and even less are from minority groups, with especially few women of colour. The empirical evidence documents several potential solutions to the lack of diversity that continue to be ignored for more individual-level responses. I call these programs that focus on individual mentoring and confidence building, “fix the women” initiatives. These approaches require that individuals seek change upwards as opposed to organisations committing to tackling structural problems systematically.

Institutional change
The types of institutional programs that we really need across the sector should focus on transparency of policies; measuring outcomes; publishing data about what’s working and not working (not just a gender breakdown); and key performance indicators for managers that address hiring and promoting minorities in the workplace.

As a woman of colour working in equity and diversity, my approach is very different to White women. Any time women of colour point out how issues of racial exclusion impact gender equity, we are labelled aggressive. We become the problem because we are calling attention to the complexity of equity and diversity issues, beyond simple differences between cisgender men and women.

Equity and diversity initiatives that are done right, with intersectionality at their heart, disrupt business as usual. In reality, current equity and diversity initiatives are undertaken by minorities in their spare time, with extra workload, but without any additional time, pay or other resources.

Rethinking our place
Most people don’t want to contribute towards discrimination. They don’t want to be seen as racist or homophobic or transphobic or ableist. But when push comes to shove people in dominant social positions aren’t ready to sacrifice their creature comforts or any of their privilege in order to show true solidarity to minorities. For example, they will not think to give up a speaking position at a prestigious conference; they will not nominate women of colour for awards; they will not recommend minorities be given grants over other White people.

People who belong to multiple minority groups will experience multiple forms of exclusion. The barriers they come up against are systemic. Inequality is embedded in the ways we think about leadership, how we reward people, and how people make daily decisions without taking the time to truly reflect on our own biases.

Walking the talk
Structural change begins when leaders walk the talk, not just talk about diversity. This includes wrestling with tough concepts like colonialism and making other meaningful change. Institutions that contribute to structural change also hold themselves publicly accountable to meet quotas and to stand firm and invest in the promotion of minority staff. Unfortunately, resources continue to be diverted from diversity by funding programs that exclusively benefit White cisgender middle class women.

We should all take notice of small details as well as bigger cues, such as who you sit with every day, who talks in meetings you attend, and whose voices are silenced. It’s not good enough to point to equity and diversity policies, which basically meet legal requirements. We need to advance equity and diversity with real investment in people and resources. We can’t continue to have this important work being led by minorities in their spare time.

Working together
For the tech sector in Melbourne, I hope the conversation at the Tech Inclusion conference will be the start of collective change. We should be able to leverage the lessons by working together towards real change. We must continue to hold each other accountable for making progress that includes minorities moving ahead.

You can read more about our discussion in context, as well as a write-up of the other panels, by heading to my research blog: https://othersociologist.com/2018/04/02/tech-inclusion/

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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please read my blog post.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#sociology #socialscience #equity #diversity #inclusion #antiracism #intersectionality #research #academia #technology #womeninstem #womeninscience #womenintech
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Sexual Harassment in Australian Science
An investigation by UC Berkeley found that Professor Terry Speed sexually harassed a woman postdoc over a two-year period, and that Professor Speed also created a culture of hostility for another male scientist, whom he tried to enlist to "get to her" (the survivor of his harassment). Professor Speed is employed by Berkeley, as well as Australia's most prestigious medical research institute, the Walter & Elizabeth Hall Institute (WEHI) and he is a Fellow of the Academy of Sceince. Here some quotes from my interview with ABC News:

"I wrote an email to executives of the Academy of Science... I asked them to make a public statement about the case involving Professor Speed. I told them to take very direct action publicly about what they would do with their sexual harassment policies and also pointed them to other materials and practical steps that they could take to be more transparent about where they stand on sexual harassment.

"As leaders in the Australian science community, this type of institution can set the tone for the rest of the science community and they should be using their influence to minimise the harm of sexual harassment and other forms of discrimination.

"It's important that they don't stay silent because silence tells the rest of the science community that any woman who speaks out is going to be met with a wall of nonresponse, non-action, that she's alone and it discourages survivors from coming forward and reporting..."

Listen to this powerful investigation: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/backgroundbriefing/harassment-in-science/9566122#transcript

Read part of the background to this sexual harassment investigation here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-23/terry-speed-ally-of-women-in-science-accused-of-harassment/9546170?pfmredir=sm

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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please listen to the podcast and read the article.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#sociology #socialscience #sexualharassment #academia #vaw #education #students #stem #science #womeninscience #australia #stemwomen
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Silence Over Harassment, Assault on Australian Campuses
I was interviewed by The Australian on sexual harassment in science and academia:

Zuleyka Zevallos, an adjunct professor at Swinburne University who has worked professionally in the field of gender equity, says there is ample scientific evidence to show that sexual harassment is a common experience for academics as well as students.

“There are reasons why we have enough data to know the formal complaints are just the tip of the iceberg,” she says.

“We know from other resources, from nationally representative data, from other research, that most people who experience sexual harassment do not report (it), because they fear professional retaliation.”

Read the article: https://www.theaustralian.com.au/higher-education/silence-over-harassment-assault-on-australian-campuses/news-story/becdba48823a322bd1fb1c243ce33e0e

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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please read the article.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#sociology #socialscience #sexualharassment #academia #vaw #education #students #stem #science #womeninscience
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Making New Worlds
I'm featured in the first episode of Making New Worlds, a podcast featuring experts from different fields discussing the ethics of colonising other planets. Noting the question is not about scientific space exploration (collecting data about other planets), but whether it is ethical for humans to settle Mars or other planets. My responses represent sociological considerations about the inequality that is inherent in colonialism. The quotes below are excerpts from me; listen to the entire podcast in the link below.

“Zuleyka Zevallos: And there is something profoundly unethical about the idea that we just discard our planet after we’ve done so much damage and then go without having learnt anything and think that we’re going to overcome the problems we weren’t willing to do on our own planet.”

That’s Dr. Zuleyka Zevallos, an applied sociologist with Swinburne University in Australia. Her research specialties include race, gender, and intersectionality, and she has a lot of experience running programs that work to increase diversity in science.

“So there’s a lot of problems in these discussions that really stem from the fact that many people who are enthusiastic about colonizing other planets don’t understand the history, they aren’t willing to do the work to fix the systems that they are already a part of here.”

“…while I can see why there’s a lot of excitement around the idea of so-called discovering new worlds and thinking about life in other places, I think some of that enthusiasm does come from a lack of awareness about the issues that we’ve faced regarding colonialism in different societies across time. And in fact, a lot of those conversations ignore the current issues that we have about colonisation. I think many people who have not been on the receiving end of colonialism don’t understand that colonialisation is still happening on Earth as we speak.”

_“So, colonialism is a process that is rooted in historical and political processes. It’s really about how various nation-states have been able to enrich themselves through the economic and social control of other countries and other subgroups. And in particular, colonialism is the use of violence and state force as well as ideology that legitimises taking over the land and resources and cultures of other groups in order to further colonial powers...”

Zuleyka pointed out that we don’t know for certain that there is no life on Mars, for example, that we might damage with our colonies. This is something I’ll be talking about in more detail in a later episode of the podcast. But Zuleyka also pointed out that colonialism can hurt other groups of people, too, not just the indigenous beings:

Zuleyka Zevallos: “The other aspect is really about the efforts of what it would take for human beings to colonise other lands. And that effort, we know, from history, is one of inherent inequality. The people who finance the colonial efforts are not the people who do the hard work, who will have to build the machines, who will have to, you know, build the structures that would facilitate colonialisation. And certainly the people who do that labour, that manual labour, will not be the ones who benefit from any space settlements that might be set up...”

I asked my guests whether they had any suggestions for what space settlement enthusiasts could do now to try to avoid repeating the mistakes from our past. Zuleyka Zevallos pointed to conversations like the one we’re having now.

Zuleyka Zevallos: “I think, you know, that one of the fundamental things that has to happen is for conversations to be happening with the r— between the right groups. So, for the groups that are advocating space exploration, to actually connect with, you know, scientists and community leaders from groups that have a keen understanding of the history and current impacts of colonialism. So that means listening to the leadership and the wisdom and the scientific knowledges that come from from various Indigenous groups, you know, speaking to groups that have experienced enslavement, including various Black communities from different parts of the world.”

Read and listen: https://makingnewworlds.com/2017/11/15/episode-1-why-are-we-going/


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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please read the article.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#sociology #socialscience #equity #diversity #inclusion #antiracism #intersectionality #research #academia #space #colonialism #postcolonialism #mars #planets #astronomy #podcast
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Racial Preferences in Dating
I was interviewed about racial preferences in dating for the Triple J show, “The Hook Up,” along with Dr Denton Callender, a research fellow at the Kirby Institute, and Dr Ian Stephen. The podcast included calls from listeners who shared what it’s like to be fetishised on dating apps, as well as the racial biases that White people exercise.

Here's part of the transcript.

Hannah: I asked sociologist, Zuleyka Zevallos, where these ethnic preferences might be coming from.
Zuleyka: It goes back to the way we think about beauty. We’re socialised from a really young age to be looking out for certain types of physical traits – and a lot of them are associated with Whiteness. It’s about: having very light skin; having a particular type of nose – various types of features that are more common amongst people who are White.

Hannah: So you think beauty is a cultural idea, not a physical one?
Zuleyka: It is very much shaped by culture. We know that because there are patterns. You talked about the patterns on dating apps. There are patterns in which people couple more generally, in marriage – those types of patterns. If it wasn’t culturally shaped, there wouldn’t be patterns because everyone would have an equal chance of hooking up with people, and having relationships with, people outside of their own racial group.

Hannah: I’ve heard the argument that having an ethnic preference is like having a preference for blondes or brunettes. Is that really the same thing?
Zuleyka: Not really, because there is a lot of variability within and across racial groups. So you can find a lot of different traits across ethnic groups. But since people will say, particularly on their online profiles, when they’re using dating apps, they will say things like: “No Asians.” Or, “No Black people,” things like that.

Hannah: We are going to be talking that in more detail in just a little while.
Zuleyka: Great! I think that things show that people learn to think about sexuality and what attracts them in particular ways that are very much exclusionary to people of colour.

Hannah: And so, do you think we’re socially conditioned to find certain ethnicities more attractive?
Zuleyka: Yes. It comes across in a lot of research particularly to your listeners who would be people of colour would be told things like, “Oh you’re pretty for a Black girl,” or things like that, which show that people are thought about being attractive or unattractive the closer they are to European ideals of beauty. It’s through various forms of culture, from paintings through to film – we’re surrounded by these ideas that a certain type of look is more attractive than others.

Hannah: This preference for whiteness in dating, do you think sometimes we find that hard to accept?
Zuleyka: I think so. I think it’s because in Australia, we don’t really have a language to think about race. We don’t really talk about race, unless we’re talking about racism. In other countries, like the United States, people have more open conversations. Whereas here, I think that we’re scared to talk about race and racism because people are afraid to be thought of as racist. It’s not like people will be consciously discriminating against groups, even when they say things like, “No Asians,” or whatever it is – [Hannah interrupts].

Hannah: – Wait, how is that not consciously discriminating?
Zuleyka: [Laughs] Well if you speak to people who make those statements, they will tell you that they think they’re not being racist because in Australia we think of racism as something that is really overt. Like screaming at somebody an insult, or not giving somebody a job. Overt forms of racism is what we recognise as racism, but the everyday functions of race – like whom we’re attracted to – we are afraid to think about what that might mean about our racial identities and how we relate to other people.

Read more on my blog: https://othersociologist.com/2018/02/10/racial-preferences-dating/

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Commenting policy
Before commenting on this post, please read my article, and the scientific sources on my blog.

I moderate comments to maintain a safe space first and foremost for women of colour of various backgrounds, and also to support the voices of other minority groups who are marginalised. I welcome comments but please note that I do not allow abuse. People commenting should discuss sociology; be polite; stay on topic; and be aware of their own bias. My commenting policy is in my About section of G+ and also here: https://othersociologist.com/about/commenting-policy/

Please note I often lock my posts overnight or close off comments after a few days when I'm unable to moderate. This keeps my threads free from abuse.

#sociology #socialscience #equity #racism #antiracism #dating #research #academia #relationships
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