Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Z Strength, Fitness & Sports Performance
40 followers -
Customized online training and nutrition programming for your goals.
Customized online training and nutrition programming for your goals.

40 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Do You NEED To or Do You WANT To?

It's subtle, but saying you need to do something can trigger negative reactions, hampering our fitness quest. Think about most of what you "need to" do as an adult -- pay taxes, pay the bills, buy groceries, go to work, etc. You might sneak in 1 or 2 things where you wake-up and say "Yippee, I need to do" some task, but for the most part, when you need to do it, it's an obligation that you would avoid if you could.

Yet we say things like "I need to workout" when we're dead tired, making it that much harder to stay on track. This is one of the times where I say you need to fix your language. You need to be in your own corner and use words that can help you subconsciously--

You want to workout. You want to prep a delicious meal that's healthy. You WANT TO reach your goal and if you want to not be miserable along the way and actually enjoy the result, you need to want to do the work.
Photo
Add a comment...

I've been involved in some pretty interesting conversations over the years. Topics that are constantly evolving around training and nutrition. Occasionally, I find myself involved in conversations about technique / styles of performing an exercise. Recently, the conversation was about breathing during the squat, and while there are a lot of good pieces of advice being thrown around, I could also see where there's a disconnect between proper technique and what people are finding on the internet or being taught by bad personal trainers.

A lot of fitness is variable and can be answered with "it depends", but when it comes to technique, there are certain rules that should apply, whether it's the lightest weight ever or a record setting attempt.

1 - Proper Breathing -- Bracing, Breathing In, and Breathing Out all have an effect on how safe and effective a rep is. Proper bracing requires a big "belly" breath that is compressed and held. I've seen many people wait until they are holding the weight before attempting to get their air in. You might be able to do this while it's light, but under a heavy weight, you will get a fraction of the air and create a weaker brace. I've also seen many people blow out their air too early, also weakening their brace. While doing reps, it is important to temporarily pause the movement at the top to re-breathe.

2 - Getting TIGHT -- your glutes, lats, grip, etc. Engaging muscles, creating a stable base to generate power from is important, whether you are training to move heavy weight or not. The muscle tension, combined with bracing will help you stay stable, protect your joints, and control the weight. Again, with a light weight, you may feel this is unnecessary, but the act of squeezing potentiates the nervous system, stimulating more muscle fibers.

3 - Treat EVERY REP like it's heavy - the number of stupid injuries I've seen under warm-up weights is astounding. Just because it's a weight you can throw around for 20+ reps doesn't mean it can't hurt you because you choose to ignore #1 & #2.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Another week down and on to the next one. We can sit around and make excuses for everything we aren’t getting done, or we could actually do the things we’re complaining about doing. This week’s posts & podcasts tackles some of the common questions and…
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We all LOVE the idea of PERFECT. Perfect diet, perfect workout, perfect results.

Perfect is bullshit. It's this imaginary level we believe our idols have attained. And we're wrong. They aren't perfect. Everything isn't coming up Millhouse for them even though it looks like it from our perspective. There are mistakes being made that they see that we overlook when they're made.

I used to be a golfer. I was pretty good, but I would go through patches where I "sucked" and I was never good enough because I'd hit a few bad shots or miss an easy putt. I used to believe it had to be perfect or it wasn't worth it. It ruined me until my buddy John said "It isn't about perfect and it isn't about if you miss, because you will. It's about how good your misses are."

Go ahead, shake your head like he's crazy. I did. And then I realized what he was saying. I saw a 5 yard miss that was still in the fairway or an approach that was on the wrong tier of the green as bad when somebody just starting out would see those shots as perfect.

Fitness is the same thing, you just aren't chasing a white ball, you're chasing a metric that you made up for yourself, whether it's your calories, macros, scale weight, or how much you load on the bar. The fact of the matter is we will always have imperfections, but the longer we can stick with it, the more we can refine our technique and approaches, the better our misses become... and that, folks, is is what we should all work for.
-
You don't need to be perfect, you just need to work to make your range of misses, smaller.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I decided to run an intentional cut using the Z-Strength macro calculator. I have a goal weight in mind and a "look" that I'm going for. 10 days in, my average weight is down 4 lbs. Normally, when I run a cut, my strength suffers. This time, my strength hasn't wavered. What does all that mean?

That means the training program I am running, combined with the calories and macros that the calculator gave me (and updated after 7 days when I did a check-in) are helping me maintain muscle while shedding fat.

Why is this working for me?
-I followed the predicted calories and checked in at the end of week 1
-The calculator updated my calories and macros for week 2, which I'm on right now
-I weight-train 3 days per week, consistently
-I'm more than 80% accurate on my calories every day, including the weekends
-I sleep (as much as I can with a 19 month old)

Am I saying you should give the Z Strength calculator a shot if you have a weight / physique goal in mind? Yes. Yes, I am. And if you want to try the intelligent updates, I'll give you the first 2 weeks free after signing up through PayPal.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
It's 2019, but fat loss is still the same --

The #1 factor in changing your weight and body composition is your nutrition. You need to have a caloric deficit for the scale to go down. If you aren't losing weight, you aren't in a deficit. Jumping on the scale 1 day per week just doesn't cut it. Ate more sodium than normal? Worked out harder yesterday? Ate more carbs than usual? Your weight can change pretty drastically in just 1 day, so it's important to weigh at least twice each week and use the average.

Anybody can lose weight, you just eat at a deficit, but the goal isn't just "weight" loss, it's fat loss! Losing fat requires a deficit, but it also requires maintaining the muscle you currently have. You want to keep muscle because it a) helps keep your metabolism up b) gives you shapes. How do you keep the muscle while dropping the fat? You strength train; not the 12+ reps with light weight, but moderate weights for 3-4 sets of 5-8 on compound exercises. Why? Multi-joint exercises recruit more muscle and doing 3-4 sets of 5-8 reps triggers the body to respond by repairing and maintaining the muscle.

Protein & Vegetables are great for helping you feel full. Since protein is the building block of muscle, it's important to get enough protein to repair the muscle you're breaking down by lifting. If you're truly in a deficit, you won't be building new muscle unless you're an absolute newb. Vegetables are nutrient-dense, calorie-light magicians that can help you feel full, making it easier to survive while eating in a deficit.

Sleep is talked about so much that it's not worth me going into again. Your body needs sleep in order to recover and if you aren't recovering, you aren't going to make it very far.

Patience & Consistency - THERE ARE NO MIRACLES. It takes hard work, a lot of stumbling, getting knocked down, and getting back up. And it takes doing it day after day, week after week, month after month.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Welcome to the New Year! I hope everything has gotten off to a good start. We all know the first few days of the new year are filled with excitement and jumping into the deep end for most people chasing goals. The 1st edition of Fitness Posts & Podcasts…
Add a comment...

Putting yourself 1st isn't selfish. Somebody expecting to be put 1st, over you, is selfish.

Think about that for a little bit.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Patience is a HUGE part of the process.
.
Focusing on what you can control is another.
.
You can't control how fast somebody else reaches their goal. You can't "fix" your genetics. You can't (naturally) speed up some processes or control them. You have complete control over 1 thing. Your EFFORT.
.
How well you plan, prepare, and the effort you put into execution is the only thing that is 100% on you. The best coach in the world can't make you give it your best on your training sessions, that's on you. The best diet plan can't make you walk away from the damn donuts at work, that's you.
.
The biggest disservice you can do for yourself is blaming others for your lack of effort. Effort is all about you and what you're willing to give to get what you want.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Just a friendly reminder for everybody that said "I'll start in the new year."
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded