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Zoo Atlanta
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The official Zoo Atlanta Google+ page.
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The first 250 families bringing items for the Super Bowl LIII Recycling Rally will receive a gift bag, and all who drop off items will receive a discount on Zoo admission! Drop off your e-waste tomorrow, January 19 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and help with the “greening of Super Bowl LIII!”

Accepted items include laptop computers, LCD monitors, televisions, gaming consoles, cell phones, earphones and more! Click the Recycling Rally link in our bio for the full list of items. #SB53 #OnlyZooATL
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In the full intown Atlanta area that was part of the count, there were 92 different species sighted, and five of them were unique to the Grant Park and Zoo Atlanta area. One of those species was the red-headed woodpecker. If you would like to find out more about the overall results of the Christmas Bird Count nationwide or learn more about the event in general, follow the link below to the Audubon website.

https://www.audubon.org/conservation/science/christmas-bird-count

If you are interested in getting started with birding, the Atlanta Audubon Society has some great resources and events to check out:

https://www.atlantaaudubon.org/go-birding.html

We were all glad that we were able to participate in the Christmas Bird Count this year. Thanks for joining us, and happy #TakeoverTuesday! - Bird Team
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One of the key practices when it comes to watching wildlife, especially birds, is patience. If you think that you saw a bird or animal that you are watching for, linger for a few minutes. If we didn’t linger when we thought we saw a bird pop out from inside the tree briefly, we would not have seen this red-headed woodpecker. Woodpeckers often nest and roost in tree cavities. This particular individual looked to be cleaning out a new cavity for itself. #TakeoverTuesday - Bird Team
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Some birds are much more difficult to identify than others. The group of birds called warblers are notorious for giving people a difficult time to identify, especially when they are sporting their non-breeding plumages. Here we have a pine warbler, which we were able to identify using context clues. Four important clues to remember when identifying birds are: size and shape, color pattern, behavior and habitat. Whether you are a beginning birder or an expert, these four clues will help you enjoy the experience of going outside and learning more about the fascinating bird-world around you. #TakeoverTuesday - Bird Team
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RARE VAGRANT ALERT! During Christmas Bird Counts, people always dream of finding an unusual species to tell their friends about. (A vagrant bird is a bird that has strayed from its typical range, sometimes due to a storm or other unusual circumstances.) We were lucky enough to be graced by the presence of this beautiful Homo sapiens - the Curator of Birds at Zoo Atlanta! His knowledge, expertise and leadership was integral in the success of our bird count. Thank you, James! #TakeoverTuesday - Bird Team
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Can you identify this bird? It is one of the most commonly seen birds in Atlanta and we have them all over Grant Park and Zoo Atlanta! Their long, upturned tail and wide variety of melodious songs are great ways to narrow down their identification. You can often see them in wide open spaces and neighborhoods. They have an amazingly broad repertoire of songs that typically grows as they get older as they mimic other bird calls. #TakeoverTuesday - Bird Team
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Grant Park and Zoo Atlanta are both great spots to go birding, even though they are located in the city. Both places offer unique habitat types that allow birds of all types to find a home, forage for food, or just stop to rest during migration. Grant Park has a lot of large trees, similar to an old growth forest, which is great to find birds like woodpeckers, blackbirds, owls and several other species that prefer dwelling in a forest canopy. Even though Zoo Atlanta is in Grant Park, it has more mid-level plants like shrubs and smaller trees offering habitats to smaller birds, like wrens, cardinals, thrashers and many others. Between the two, we were able to see some species that could not be found in other areas of Atlanta! #TakeoverTuesday - Bird Team
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Knock knock
Who’s there?
Woodpecker
Woodpecker who?
Knock knock…

Do you know how many species of woodpecker you can usually find in the Atlanta-area? Hint: we saw five species when we were birding, and that’s not all of them! Be sure to not only look for them, but listen as well. You can typically hear them knocking on wood before you even see them. #TakeoverTuesday - Bird Team
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When looking for birds, keep in mind that you will not find all of them up high in the trees. In a single spot, you should start looking down on the ground and gradually look up. Different species prefer different levels of a singular space. Nuthatches, like this one, and woodpeckers spend a lot of time on tree trunks. Blackbirds, thrashers, and robins can often be spotted on the ground. Jays, warblers, and owls will be spending time in the trees. However, don’t forget to look up to the sky, otherwise you might miss birds flying overhead like hawks, vultures, and various migrating flocks. #TakeoverTuesday - Bird Team
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You know that saying, “the early bird gets the worm”? Well, it’s actually true! Many birds rise very early and have peak activity levels at dawn and dusk. Our Team arrived at the Zoo earlier than normal to care for our own birds, first and foremost, but also so we were ready to count the native birds just as they began their day. During certain times of the year, you can find large flocks of different species mixed together. We learned that large flocks of blackbirds can have quite a few different species present. How many species can you name from this video? #TakeoverTuesday - Bird Team
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