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Zeh Fernando
Lives in New York, NY
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As cRaZyY as that sounds, Firstborn is looking for a Senior Flash/AS3 developer for a great project. Here's more information. Please re-share. Message or e-mail me for more information.
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Jesse Warden's profile photoZeh Fernando's profile photoNico Troia's profile photo
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Just applied this morning :) Hope I have a shot
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Anyone using Atlassian's enterprise products at work (Jira, BitBucket, Stash, etc)? Opinions/comments/alternatives?
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corey light's profile photo
 
I enjoy Jira - it's fast, has few bugs that I've run into, and has just enough flexibility to suit a range of workflows.
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Zeh Fernando

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There's something so cool about super short funny clips.
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Zeh Fernando

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I'm not a religious person. I'm usually pretty pragmatic. But I still have a little bit of supersticiousness in me; I believe in positive energy, at least in a metaphorical sense. I like to believe that if you have a positive attitude, and are letting out positive energy, good things happen more often than not.

Today is the best day of your life. Tomorrow will be even better. Don't forget that.

I wish a great new year, full of good energy to y'all!
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Zeh Fernando

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When programming, you use math probably in its purest form. If you're learning math as you're learning programming, you're absorbing math in a more practical way than the way it is normally taught.

I've never been really into math - it was the subject that I got my worst grades in school, mostly because of terrible teachers and my disinterest with the subject back then. But when I started programming a lot of visual stuff, after some initial hurdles with trigonometry, everything was easy, probably because it was more practical and it was easy to check if something was right or wrong. I like learning by trial and error, I suppose.

Now that I' ve been going through Khan Academy's math courses for a while, though, I realize there's a lot of the math world I never actually learned. At the same time, I'm not sure they make much sense for everyday use in programming. In programming, you deal with numbers in an abstract way - you never calculate anything yourself, of course - so things like "mixed fractions" and "rational numbers" are pointless. You just need to know basic rules. You don't need to represent anything on a readable way - a number is just a number, the computer does the rest. The only distinctions you make is whether they're infinite or not, whether they're invalid (NaN) or not, and that's about it.

I'm still enjoying the courses immensely. It's giving me the background I never had. But it's almost as if I have to force myself into a different state of mind just to be able to process the lessons and exercises properly. When doing the exercises, most of the time I'm reducing everything into "variables" and simple calculations (as if I'm writing code) to find the answer, rather than going through the (shorter) solving trick they expect me to.

I'm sure watching all those videos is going to be beneficial in the long run it; more knowledge is never a bad thing. But it's almost if I'm always waiting for Sal to get to the point when watching one of his videos, because all the tricks for solving things more easily or making it more readable are things that I never use on my day to day.

I wonder if it would be like that had I learned math first, and only then started programming.
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Rhawbert Costa's profile photoZeh Fernando's profile photo
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Wow, awesome links... Good thing I'll have time to spare during year's end. I want to learn more basic trigonometry stuff so I can better understand "circular" animations and sine wave generation for electronics.

Thanks Zeh!
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Have him in circles
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Zeh Fernando

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Happy Friday with new Glitch Mob
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Zeh Fernando

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[pt-br] Metal farofa açucarado com gosto de infância. Difícil achar melhor.
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Zeh Fernando

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I've been thinking a lot about the HTML/Flash player platforms recently, and Adobe's slow deprecation of Flash support, and I've noticed something interesting.

In the heydays of Flash, being tied to a "close" platform (Flash) controlled by a single company (Adobe) was a positive thing. It allowed the platform to move at a very, very fast pace, unencumbered by slow committee decisions. We'd get exciting new features added to the platform on every new version. I still remember when Bitmap capabilities were added to it, then filters, then the pseudo-3d, then bitmap triangle drawing... it was magical. I had been using Flash since version 2, so it was nice seeing it evolving as our needs did.

So at the time, one of the strongest arguments in support of the platform as a closed platform was that it could evolve at a very fast pace. HTML, on the other hand, was slowed down by lengthy discussions, to the point where any new feature would take many years to show up in most people's browsers. I remember seeing the jokes that HTML5 wouldn't be ready until 2022 or whatever. This was accurate and in my opinion overshadowed any of the other arguments against Flash.

This was the bright side of a closed platform. We're past a threshold now, though, and what we're seeing today is the other side of the coin. It's a much darker side.

Personally, the Flash platform is not moving in a direction that pleases me, or at least not at the right speed. Adobe seems committed and focused on the AIR platform, which makes sense - I like the new numbering scheme, for example, and the new fast release cycle. Still, what I'm seeing is features added in a scatter shot manner, often with showstopping bugs that go ignored for a long time or completely forgotten.

(Examples I can mention are GameInput, which still have one showstopping performance bug on Windows machines and one very weird bug on Android, and Stage3d/StageVideo integration which was removed from the platform a couple of years ago and never added back despite promises to the contrary; many more examples of forgotten bugs exist.)

This, in my opinion, is the dark side of a closed platform. We have bugs no one can look into because, of course, no one has access to it. We have things that are barely documented and kind of arcane with a lot of legacy misinformation (e.g. wmode/renderMode) because no one can look at the code path to see what it is actually doing.

On top of that, several (brilliant) engineers and evangelists have been moved out of the Flash platform in favor of other technologies (HTML). You don't see people posting about exciting new features, you don't see engineers talking about the internals of the Player. They're gone or silenced. More than anything, this is the writing on the wall for developers: Adobe is phasing Flash out.

I'm a realist. I think HTML5 is the future. I can't blame Adobe for their move. I'm sure they have very limited resources so they need to put their chips on what they think will give them bigger rewards in the long run.

HTML development may move slower. You need several different vendors to agree on a feature before it's implemented. This is the interesting part, and the point of this whole rant, though: thanks in part to the path braved by Flash, HTML(5) is now arriving at a pretty mature state, and you don't have to add features to it at a very fast pace. Sure, things like workers and sockets and local storage are good, but the reality is, 90% of what you'd want to create with a "rich" website is already fully possible with HTML5+. The agility of a closed platform is now moot.

I think the lesson here is that we just can't give labels to a platform. Being either closed or open isn't a good thing by itself. It depends on context.

At a certain point, being closed was good for creators of Flash content. Right now, it's pretty detrimental.

At a certain point, being open was bad for HTML(5). Right now, it doesn't matter that much, and it's probably a good thing in the long run (there's room for experimentation).

For Flash, this all contributes to create a zombie community. Gone are the days where we'd have daily amazing blog posts about a new feature or some striking visual created with Flash. We do see that with HTML, even if it's mostly repeating what was done 5 years ago. And it's electrifying. It's a brave new world, even if in a shape previously seen (and let's face it, even what Flash did was old stuff for a lot of people, e. g. Director developers).

My current project at work is a Flash project. I love it and using Flash was the right thing for this (it runs on a standalone application). It wouldn't look as good in other platform, nor be done as easily.

But still? I can't wait to spend more time with HTML(5), and especially WebGL. I'm doing a bit of that on my free time, and it's just much more exciting because of the community, and because you know you're not painting yourself into a corner.
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Dwayne Neckles's profile photoGabriele Giannotti's profile photo
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Zeh Fernando

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Work & Co (from friends +Marcelo Eduardo and +Felipe Memoria) have a bunch of openings for developers, designers and product managers. They're in DUMBO, Brooklyn. I think you should work for them.
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Marcelo Eduardo's profile photo
 
Thanks for the share Zeh. We're indeed looking for some passionate front end guys to join us. Doing some nice projects with Angularjs and serious dev practices - not crammed development time after creatives had fun. 
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The Stanley Parable is an amazing game experience.

Yet it's one of difficult definition. It's one of those games many people wouldn't even call a game at all.

I can see why some of the reviews for it were so inconsistent. It would be easy not to like it, depending on your expectations of what a game should be.

Personally, I think it's magnificent. I honestly see this game as a divider. It's one more sign of maturity in the gaming genre. I wouldn't call it "fun" - that's not the point of it. It's a more introspective experience. And maybe because of where I'm coming from - having played many games before, thinking I know what to expect - it felt like a fresh twist to the genre, and one where my expectations had to be reset.

I'm sure not sure many people would feel the same. This game is not for everyone. Yes, it's "short" (although I'd say it's the perfect length), and yes, it might not even be a "game". And yet it made me question a lot of things and feel more emotions than pretty much all games have in recent times. For this I commend the game developers: thanks for taking the chance with this game.
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I write code.
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I'm a São Paulo-born front-end developer currently living in New York, NY, where I work as a principal (interface) developer for Firstborn.
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São Paulo, SP - Mogi das Cruzes, SP