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Zaid El-Hoiydi
5,904 followers -
Travel photography, nature and society.
Travel photography, nature and society.

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The Summer of the Spring
The solo tour of this morning left me more opportunities to practice my visual hobby. August weather in April is what is happening this weekend in central Europe. I've decided to enjoy it all while keeping in mind that we've probably engineered these anomalous summer temperatures.
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G.K. Chesterton
I don't know about you but reading a quote like this one irresistibly had me looking up for the man behind it. Unsurprisingly I found quite an interesting (big) British fellow.

And here is another crispy one:
“The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected."

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton,
Chesterton was a large man, standing 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) and weighing around 20 stone 6 pounds (130 kg; 286 lb).

His girth gave rise to a famous anecdote. During the First World War a lady in London asked why he was not "out at the Front"; he replied, "If you go round to the side, you will see that I am."

On another occasion he remarked to his friend George Bernard Shaw, "To look at you, anyone would think a famine had struck England." Shaw retorted, "To look at you, anyone would think you have caused it." P. G. Wodehouse once described a very loud crash as "a sound like G. K. Chesterton falling onto a sheet of tin".

Chesterton usually wore a cape and a crumpled hat, with a swordstick in hand, and a cigar hanging out of his mouth. He had a tendency to forget where he was supposed to be going and miss the train that was supposed to take him there. It is reported that on several occasions he sent a telegram to his wife Frances from some distant (and incorrect) location.

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30 years later the nearly silent and totally emission-free lithium ion technology has brought me back to many trails where younger me once was roaming on smelly and noisy gasoline powered motorcycles.

Here are traces of one of the two trips I did yesterday, 60 km spent in the forests is now how I enjoy spending time during the busiest shopping afternoon of the week.
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4/22/18
6 Photos - View album
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Spring Green
I spent most of today riding my bike in forests like this and, as I wasn't alone, I barely manage to catch this shot. The rest will remain in my memory for a little while longer, making my love of nature stronger, if that is still possible.
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Getting a little electrical transportation help for my electrical bike to reach faraway destinations. That currently works best because most other bikers still use their car when in the same situation.
The first three pictures are from today.
#CarFree
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Before the Washing Machine
Last year I stumbled across an old picture about a place, a fountain, I only knew for its decorative value. I hadn't realized its past importance before.
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The everyday washing of clothes in earlier times was no small undertaking, a fact easily forgotten nowadays. An invention like the washing machine was seen as a huge blessing for (wo-)mankind.

The “big wash” took place two or three times a year in rural areas. Only underclothes, children’s clothing or nappies were regularly washed by hand. Everything else was put aside for the “big wash” day. Dirty washing had to be stored in a dry place or hung up, otherwise moisture would cause dreaded mold stains to appear.

The big wash often lasted several days. It not only required careful preparation such as sorting out and soaking the washing, cleaning the apparatus, hanging up the washing lines, preparing the firewood and so on, but also many helping hands. Family members were set to work, as were the servants and washerwomen in more prosperous households.

The dirty washing, well packed into a linen cloth, was placed in large wooden vats. The washerwomen laid a small sack full of beech ashes, which served as soap, right in the bottom of the vat. Water was boiled and poured over the washing. It was continuously collected as it ran out of the container, reheated and poured over the washing again.

As a result of this repeated pouring on of water the ashes combine with the water to form a leaching solution which dissolves the fat and the dirt. After it has been rinsed in the trough at the fountain the clean, beautifully fresh-smelling washing is hung out to dry on the lines.
#Bern, Läuferbrunnen
The related album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/0d26MhsxvrugPyZg1
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4/17/18
8 Photos - View album
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Good with Paints, Clumsy with Words.
It has been a couple of months since I last came around here, long enough for local artists (I strongly assume), to newly express themselves.

Note how they took care to lay a white background on which to work, the importance they gave to the symbol of their street art clan and, on the other hand, the cruel limits imposed by somewhat weak writing skills.

Anyway, as plain concrete surfaces can be very boring I do hope they will leave his graphical feculence alone; something that the guy with the red writing seemed to later agree with as well.
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4/16/18
5 Photos - View album
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A additional piece of advice drawn from my own experience, those hiking up for hours before reaching the top will build up much more zen than those who took the cable car.
Via: +Ron Villejo
The only Zen you can find on the tops of mountains is the Zen you bring up there.
http://quotemirror.com/s/lhfxg
#proverbs #wisdom #zen
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Cobbles and Boulders
We can be thankful that land ownership has been early (=historically) regulated at this portion of the lake shore. This low light from near sunset (19h20) does prove the viewer that the terrain on the right has largely been kept clear, and I enjoyed the result.
Nota bene: The curve at the horizon is not that of Earth, but from the rendering of the panorama :-).
#Thun, April 10th, 2018.
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The Academic Knock
I can now confirm that this peculiar bit of the German academic culture applies in Switzerland as well. Tonight I attended to a lecture at the Institute of Philosophy at the University of Bern and at the end of the first part, the vast majority of the audience suddenly discovered I wasn't one of them.
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From: http://www.mrshea.com/misc/knocking_applause.htm
"Speaking as a "native knocker" from Germany: I think it's only common in an academic context, at university or at a conference. Here applauding could even be misunderstood as an attempt to ridicule the lecturer. But nobody tells you to knock at your first day at university, it's rather some kind of common sense, handed over from generation to generation, without knowing why."

➊ this custom not only is followed in academic circles, but also in cultural societies like literature clubs etc. and the typical german "Verein", that is club with activities ranging from gardening to mountaineering etc.. The knocking takes place usually on dignified occasions such as the annual report of the chairman of the tulip lovers club. One can notice that in societies with predominantly working and lower middle class this knocking has the aspect of a ritual which only lends the occasion dignity and portent. Also, there often seems to be some disagreement on whether to clap or to knock. In such cases members of the handclapping fraction, if outnumbered, often turn with an abashed look to knocking. The group pressure sometimes is very high to join in the knocking business, but don't ask me why.
➋ If an audience is quite carried away, it tends to clap in a situation where it usually would knock.
➌ In Germany and Austria it is customary in, again, mostly working class and lower middel class "Kneipen" (i.e. the traditional bars) to knock on the table when joining or leaving a group of acquainces at a table. Maybe there's a relationship.
➍ The younger academic generation tends to dislike this ritual, but nonetheless bows to conformity, sometimes with a bit of irony. There's a difference, though, between the knocking after lectures, which is unquestioned, and knocking at the above mentioned portentous meetings.
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