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Zahra Sadeghi
Works at Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM)
Attended University of Tehran
Lived in Menlo Park, CA
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Zahra Sadeghi

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Our #setbacks are “invisible” but they happen much more often than our successes. --Johannes Haushofer

Johannes Haushofer, a princeton professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, posted a CV of failures in an attempt to “balance the record” and “provide some perspective”. He was inspired by a 2010 Nature article by Melanie Stefan, a lecturer at the School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. She suggested that keeping a visible record of your rejected applications can help others to deal with setbacks.
The document is divided in six parts including: “Degree programs I did not get into”, “Academic positions and fellowships I did not get”, “Research funding I did not get” among others.
A Princeton psychology professor has come up with a way to show people that that their “invisible” failures and setbacks are as important as their successes. Johannes Haushofer, a princeton professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, posted a CV of failures in an attempt to “balance the record” and “provide some perspective”. He was inspired by a 2010 Nature article by Melanie Stefan, a lecturer at the School of Biomedical Sciences at the Univ...
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Zahra Sadeghi

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10 common misconceptions about Neural Networks related to the brain, stats, architecture, algorithms, data, fitting, black boxes, and dynamic environments
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Volume trading algorithms will do for starters. ;-D
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The brain activity of individuals who were just biding their time in a #brain scanner contained enough information to predict how their brains would function during a range of ordinary activities. The researchers used these at-rest signatures to predict which regions would light up—which groups of brain cells would switch on—during gambling, reading and other tasks they were asked to perform in the scanner. The technique might be used one day to assess whether certain areas of the brains of people who are paralyzed or in a comatose state are still functional, the authors say.

The study capitalizes on a relatively new method of brain imaging that looks at what is going on when a person essentially does nothing. The technique stems from the mid-1990s work of biomedical engineer Bharat Biswal, now at New Jersey Institute of Technology. Biswal noticed that scans he had taken while participants were resting in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner displayed orderly, low-frequency oscillations. He had been looking for ways to remove background noise from fMRI signals but quickly realized these oscillations were not noise. His work paved the way for a new approach known as resting-state fMRI.
Brain scans of a person doing nothing at all can predict how neural circuits will light up when that same individual is gambling or reading a book
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First, we use our sense of  #sight  to appreciate how a meal is presented, either on a dinner plate or a dining table. Our sense of #touch  can also be important when preparing or sharing food.
Next, with our sense of  #smell , we breathe in the mouth-watering aromas rising up from the meal. Finally, we enjoy and perhaps even savor the food with our sense of  #taste  .

But what about our sense of  #hearing ? Does sound also affect our dining experience?
A new report answers, ‘yes,’ it does.

Hearing is often called “the forgotten food sense," says Ryan Elder.
Elder is an assistant professor of marketing at Brigham Young University's Marriott School of Management. He says that if people notice the sound the food makes as they eat it, they might eat less.
On the other hand, watching loud television or listening to loud music while eating can hide such noises. And this could lead to overeating.

The researchers admit that the effects may not seem like much at one meal. But over a week, a month, or a year, all that food can really add up.
But besides not overeating, there is another upside.
Hearing the noises of your meal as you eat, could help you to be more mindful of the experience and perhaps help you to enjoy it more.
Eating is an experience that appeals to many of our senses. But are you ignoring the sense of hearing? Researchers found that hearing can help you enjoy your meals more and help you eat less. This story is filled with language to help you talk about experience of eating.
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The question that evolutionary psychologists Kanazawa and Li were looking to answer is what makes a life well-lived and how intelligence, population density and friendship can affect our #happiness .

Firstly, their findings showed that people who lived in more densely populated areas were less satisfied with their life in general, compared to those who live in less populated areas. The second finding that the psychologists discovered was that the more social a person is with their close friends, the greater they said their happiness was. But there was an exception. These correlations were diminished or even reversed when the results of #intelligent people were analyzed. In other words – when smart people spend time with their friends, it makes them less happy.

This generally makes sense since those intelligent people are so focused on achieving their intellectual goals, anything that takes away from those ambitions makes them unhappy.

Read more at: http://www.learning-mind.com/why-smart-people-are-better-off-alone/

Via +Anna LeMind 
We thought that human interaction makes people happier, but it turns out intelligent people are better off alone. A recent study reveals why.
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hi dear i like u
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People's ability to notice #tactile stimuli is reduced when they are carrying out a demanding #visual task

"It was already known that increasing the demands of a visual task could reduce noticing of visual and auditory stimuli." says Dr Sandra Murphy. "Our research extends this finding to the sense of touch. This is particularly important given the growing use of tactile information in warning systems. For example, some cars now provide tactile alerts when they begin drifting across lanes -- our research suggests that drivers will be less likely to notice these alerts when engaging in demanding visual tasks such as searching for directions at a busy junction."
People's ability to notice tactile stimuli is reduced when they are carrying out a demanding visual task, psychologists have demonstrated. The work explains why you might not notice your phone vibrating if you are looking for a friend's face in a crowded place, or worse, that you're being pickpocketed.
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Zahra Sadeghi

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An approachable explanation of the kernel trick, framed alongside Support Vector Machines (SVMs). Machine Learning.
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Origins of the brain networks for advanced mathematics in expert mathematicians

Marie Amalric and Stanislas Dehaene

Our work addresses the long-standing issue of the relationship between   #mathematics and #language . By scanning professional mathematicians, we show that high-level mathematical reasoning rests on a set of brain areas that do not overlap with the classical left-hemisphere regions involved in language processing or verbal semantics. Instead, all domains of mathematics we tested (algebra, analysis, geometry, and topology) recruit a bilateral network, of prefrontal, parietal, and inferior temporal regions, which is also activated when mathematicians or nonmathematicians recognize and manipulate numbers mentally. Our results suggest that high-level mathematical thinking makes minimal use of language areas and instead recruits circuits initially involved in space and number. This result may explain why knowledge of number and space, during early childhood, predicts mathematical achievement.                            
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/04/06/1603205113

"Words and language, whether written or spoken, do not seem to play any part in my thought processes."  --Albert Einstein
The ways that our brains process language and complex mathematical thinking can be quite different, according to a new study.
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“In terms of how we are trained to relate to particular genders, there’s a kind of comfort that is associated with #female voices,” Habell-Pallan says. “So, more warm, more welcoming, more nurturing, all those associations that are connected with women that are not necessary essential qualities but are socially constructed.”
 
> “When you think of an assistant you tend to think of their voice as female and it has to do with the way that labor is gendered and stratified,” said Michelle Habell-Pallan, an associate professor in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington. “So that’s no accident. That’s more something that’s out there in the cultural field that gets reproduced then in the technology. And it becomes a loop where, if you’re not conscious, you just think this is inevitable and this is the way it is. It creates this illusion that this is the way it is, how it has been, and how it shall be.”

http://www.geekwire.com/2016/why-is-ai-female-how-our-ideas-about-sex-and-service-influence-the-personalities-we-give-machines/
via +Peter Asaro
Why are the majority of the personalities we construct for artificial intelligence female? Social scientists and AI researchers weigh in.
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Dear zahra, your post was so great!
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At times the world may seem an unfriendly and sinister place, but believe that there is much more good in it than bad. All you have to do is look hard enough. and what might seem to be a series of unfortunate events may in fact be the first steps of a journey.

--Lemony Snicket
 
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The ‎Dutch redefine the "power plant" with plant power! Plant-e, a company based in the Netherlands makes gadgets that produce electrical power from living plants!
Source: www.collective-evolution.com | Original Post Date: June 8, 2015 - Plant-e, a company based out of the Netherlands, has found a way to harness electricity from living plants, using them to power Wi-Fi hotspots, cell phone chargers, and even streetlights. The company debuted their proje
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A team of experts has shown that people who display similar behavioural characteristics tend to #move their bodies in the same way.

Using a plain mirror game -- in which two 'players' are asked to imitate each other's movements -- the team showed that people who have similar movements will tend to display more organised collective behaviour.

Journal Reference:
Piotr Słowiński, Chao Zhai, Francesco Alderisio, Robin Salesse, Mathieu Gueugnon, Ludovic Marin, Benoit G. Bardy, Mario di Bernardo, Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova. Dynamic similarity promotes interpersonal coordination in joint action. Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 2016; 13 (116): 20151093 DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2015.1093
The ground-breaking study could open up new pathways for health professionals to diagnose and treat mental health conditions in the future.
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Work
Employment
  • Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM)
    Researcher, 2012 - present
    Neuroscience
  • Stanford University
    Researcher, 2013 - 2014
    Cognitive sciences
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Menlo Park, CA - Palo Alto, CA - Mountain View, CA - Tehran, Iran - Manchester, UK - Turkey - Dubai - Italy - Los Angeles, CA - Seattle, Washington
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"Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go."--T. S. Eliot
Introduction
My interests lie in the following fields:
#Cognitive Science
#Computer Vision
#Neuroscience
#Brain Science
#Machine Learning
#Psychology
#Artificial Intelligence 
#Bio-inspired Algorithms
#Robotics
#Technology
#Quotes
#Photos



Education
  • University of Tehran
    Machine Intelligence and Robotics, 2015
    PhD.
  • Artificial Intelligence, 2008
  • Software Engineering, 2006
Basic Information
Gender
Female
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Women of Google+
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Women of Google+ features and celebrates interesting women on the Google+ social networking platform.

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Since 2002 Google has put up a birthday Doodle every September. We've taken a look back at every design that's been posted.