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Zahra Sadeghi
Worked at Institute for Studies in Fundamental Sciences (IPM)
Attended University of Tehran
Lived in Oxford, UK
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Zahra Sadeghi

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“The more #confident people were about their performance, the higher the activation in brain areas such as the striatum, an area often associated with reward processing,” first author Dr Molenberghs said.

“However, too much confidence was associated with lower metacognitive ability,” co-first author Mr Trautwein added.

When combined, the results indicate that although being confident entails a reward-like component, it can lead to overconfidence which in turn can undermine #decision making.

Original Research: Abstract for “Neural correlates of metacognitive ability and of feeling confident: a large-scale fMRI study” by Pascal Molenberghs, Fynn-Mathis Trautwein, Anne Böckler, Tania Singer, and Philipp Kanske in Social,Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. Published online July 21 2016 doi:10.1093/scan/nsw093
Summary: A new study provides insight into how overconfidence can lead to poor decision making.Source: Monash University.The link between overconfidence and poor decision making is under the s
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It was then that the fox appeared.

"Good morning," said the fox.

"Good morning," the little prince responded politely, although when he turned around he saw nothing.

"I am right here," the voice said, "under the apple tree."

"Who are you?" asked the little prince, and added, "You are very pretty to look at."

"I am a fox," the fox said.

"Come and play with me," proposed the little prince. "I am so unhappy."

"I cannot play with you," the fox said. "I am not tamed."

"Ah! Please excuse me," said the little prince.

But, after some thought, he added:

"What does that mean--'tame'?"

"You do not live here," said the fox. "What is it that you are looking for?"

"I am looking for men," said the little prince. "What does that mean--'tame'?"

"Men," said the fox. "They have guns, and they hunt. It is very disturbing. They also raise chickens. These are their only interests. Are you looking for chickens?"

"No," said the little prince. "I am looking for friends. What does that mean--'tame'?"

"It is an act too often neglected," said the fox. It means to establish ties."

"'To establish ties'?"

"Just that," said the fox. "To me, you are still nothing more than a little boy who is just like a hundred thousand other little boys. And I have no need of you. And you, on your part, have no need of me. To you, I am nothing more than a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But if you tame me, then we shall need each other. To me, you will be unique in all the world. To you, I shall be unique in all the world . . ."

"I am beginning to understand," said the little prince. "There is a flower . . . I think that she has tamed me . . ."

"It is possible," said the fox. "On the Earth one sees all sorts of things."

"Oh, but this is not on the Earth!" said the little prince.

The fox seemed perplexed, and very curious.

"On another planet?"

"Yes."

"Are there hunters on that planet?"

"No."

"Ah, that is interesting! Are there chickens?"

"No."

" Nothing is perfect," sighed the fox.

But he came back to his idea.

"My life is very monotonous," the fox said. "I hunt chickens; men hunt me. All the chickens are just alike, and all the men are just alike. And, in consequence, I am a little bored. But if you tame me, it will be as if the sun came to shine on my life. I shall know the sound of a step that will be different from all the others. Other steps send me hurrying back underneath the ground. Yours will call me, like music, out of my burrow. And then look: you see the grain-fields down yonder? I do not eat bread. Wheat is of no use to me. The wheat fields have nothing to say to me. And that is sad. But you have hair that is the color of gold. Think how wonderful that will be when you have tamed me! The grain, which is also golden, will bring me back the thought of you. And I shall love to listen to the wind in the wheat . . ."

The fox gazed at the little prince, for a long time.

"Please--tame me!" he said.

"I want to, very much," the little prince replied. "But I have not much time. I have friends to discover, and a great many things to understand."

"One only understands the things that one tames," said the fox. "Men have no more time to understand anything. They buy things all ready made at the shops. But there is no shop anywhere where one can buy friendship, and so men have no friends any more. If you want a friend, tame me . . ."

"What must I do, to tame you?" asked the little prince.

"You must be very patient," replied the fox. "First you will sit down at a little distance from me--like that--in the grass. I shall look at you out of the corner of my eye, and you will say nothing. Words are the source of misunderstandings. But you will sit a little closer to me, every day . . ."

The next day the little prince came back.

"It would have been better to come back at the same hour," said the fox. "If, for example, you come at four o'clock in the afternoon, then at three o'clock I shall begin to be happy. I shall feel happier and happier as the hour advances. At four o'clock, I shall already be worrying and jumping about. I shall show you how happy I am! But if you come at just any time, I shall never know at what hour my heart is to be ready to greet you . . . One must observe the proper rites . . ."

"What is a rite?" asked the little prince.

"Those also are actions too often neglected," said the fox. "They are what make one day different from other days, one hour from other hours. There is a rite, for example, among my hunters. Every Thursday they dance with the village girls. So Thursday is a wonderful day for me! I can take a walk as far as the vineyards. But if the hunters danced at just any time, every day would be like every other day, and I should never have any vacation at all."


So the little prince tamed the fox. And when the hour of his departure drew near--

"Ah," said the fox, "I shall cry."

"It is your own fault," said the little prince. "I never wished you any sort of harm; but you wanted me to tame you . . ."

"Yes, that is so," said the fox.

"But now you are going to cry!" said the little prince.

"Yes, that is so," said the fox.

"Then it has done you no good at all!"

"It has done me good," said the fox, "because of the color of the wheat fields." And then he added:

"Go and look again at the roses. You will understand now that yours is unique in all the world. Then come back to say goodbye to me, and I will make you a present of a secret."


The little prince went away, to look again at the roses.

"You are not at all like my rose," he said. " As yet you are nothing. No one has tamed you, and you have tamed no one. You are like my fox when I first knew him. He was only a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But I have made him my friend, and now he is unique in all the world."

And the roses were very much embarassed.

" You are beautiful, but you are empty ," he went on. "One could not die for you. To be sure, an ordinary passerby would think that my rose looked just like you--the rose that belongs to me. But in herself alone she is more important than all the hundreds of you other roses: because it is she that I have watered; because it is she that I have put under the glass globe; because it is she that I have sheltered behind the screen; because it is for her that I have killed the caterpillars (except the two or three that we saved to become butterflies); because it is she that I have listened to, when she grumbled, or boasted, or ever sometimes when she said nothing. Because she is my rose.


And he went back to meet the fox.

"Goodbye," he said.

"Goodbye," said the fox. "And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."

"What is essential is invisible to the eye," the little prince repeated, so that he would be sure to remember.

"It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important."

"It is the time I have wasted for my rose--" said the little prince, so that he would be sure to remember.

"Men have forgotten this truth," said the fox. "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. You are responsible for your rose . . ."

"I am responsible for my rose," the little prince repeated, so that he would be sure to remember. 
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Good read.. always loved this little booklet.
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Coarse #conceptual categories which are typically used by #infants for object recognition are emerged in higher layers of deep neural network.

http://pec.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/06/01/0301006616651950.abstract
Abstract In this paper, I investigate conceptual categories derived from developmental processing in a deep neural network. The similarity matrices of deep representation at each layer of neural network are computed and compared with their raw representation. While the clusters generated by raw representation stand at the basic level of abstraction, conceptual categories obtained from deep representation shows a bottom-up transition procedure. Re...
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“The love of complexity without reductionism makes #art ; the love of complexity with reductionism makes #science .” — E.O. Wilson

Via +Chris Baldassano 
http://www.princeton.edu/~chrisb/blog/
In the 1950s William S. Burroughs popularized an art form called the "cut-up technique." The idea was to take existing stories (in text, audio, or video) and cut them up into pieces, and then recombine them into something new. His creations are a juxaposition of (often disturbing) imagery, ...
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An approachable explanation of the kernel trick, framed alongside Support Vector Machines (SVMs). Machine Learning.
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Origins of the brain networks for advanced mathematics in expert mathematicians

Marie Amalric and Stanislas Dehaene

Our work addresses the long-standing issue of the relationship between   #mathematics and #language . By scanning professional mathematicians, we show that high-level mathematical reasoning rests on a set of brain areas that do not overlap with the classical left-hemisphere regions involved in language processing or verbal semantics. Instead, all domains of mathematics we tested (algebra, analysis, geometry, and topology) recruit a bilateral network, of prefrontal, parietal, and inferior temporal regions, which is also activated when mathematicians or nonmathematicians recognize and manipulate numbers mentally. Our results suggest that high-level mathematical thinking makes minimal use of language areas and instead recruits circuits initially involved in space and number. This result may explain why knowledge of number and space, during early childhood, predicts mathematical achievement.                            
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/04/06/1603205113

"Words and language, whether written or spoken, do not seem to play any part in my thought processes."  --Albert Einstein
The ways that our brains process language and complex mathematical thinking can be quite different, according to a new study.
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Zahra Sadeghi

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"I am constantly trying to communicate something incommunicable, to explain something inexplicable, to tell about something I only feel in my bones and which can only be experienced in those bones."

--Franz Kafka

#Quote
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"Somewhere, Something Incredible Is Waiting To Be Known."
--Carl Sagan

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The current policy that almost all of social networks are following, is the free mode in which everyone has access to the posts of their friends. Now although some might argue that this is the distinctive feature of social networks that all information is easily available and you can grab them without leaving any noticeable sign, I rather think a better mechanism in many ways would be a bit more restricted mode in which you can't see a post unless you click on it. This strategy comes with two benefits: First, when you post something you can track who has viewed it, and secondly, you're not exposed to all posts in your news feed and you're invulnerable from the effects of unwanted reading in an unconscious way . Instead, you can control what and who really matters to you and can decide to pick out your favorite stuff deliberately. I think it might be time to change the common trend of "how many liked" towards the more sophisticated phenomena of "how many read"!
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سلام
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Antibiotics treat #bacterial infections. Colds and flu are caused by #viruses . So taking #antibiotics for these illnesses is an entirely futile and wasteful exercise.
The more we take antibiotics particularly when they're not necessary — the more we increase the chances of helping develop antibiotic-resistant bacteria. These "superbugs," as they're known, have become a huge public health threat around the world, killing thousands of people every year and, researchers expect, many millions more in the coming decades.
http://www.vox.com/2015/11/16/9743580/antibiotics-colds-bad

In the United States in 2010-2011, there was an estimated annual antibiotic prescription rate per 1000 population of 506, but only an estimated 353 antibiotic prescriptions were likely appropriate, supporting the need for establishing a goal for outpatient antibiotic stewardship.
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2518263
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Our #setbacks are “invisible” but they happen much more often than our successes. --Johannes Haushofer

Johannes Haushofer, a princeton professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, posted a CV of failures in an attempt to “balance the record” and “provide some perspective”. He was inspired by a 2010 Nature article by Melanie Stefan, a lecturer at the School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. She suggested that keeping a visible record of your rejected applications can help others to deal with setbacks.
The document is divided in six parts including: “Degree programs I did not get into”, “Academic positions and fellowships I did not get”, “Research funding I did not get” among others.
A Princeton psychology professor has come up with a way to show people that that their “invisible” failures and setbacks are as important as their successes. Johannes Haushofer, a princeton professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, posted a CV of failures in an attempt to “balance the record” and “provide some perspective”. He was inspired by a 2010 Nature article by Melanie Stefan, a lecturer at the School of Biomedical Sciences at the Univ...
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10 common misconceptions about Neural Networks related to the brain, stats, architecture, algorithms, data, fitting, black boxes, and dynamic environments
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Volume trading algorithms will do for starters. ;-D
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Have her in circles
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Work
Employment
  • Institute for Studies in Fundamental Sciences (IPM)
    Researcher, 2012 - 2016
    Neuroscience
  • University of Oxford
    Researcher, 2016 - 2016
  • Stanford University
    Researcher, 2013 - 2014
    Cognitive sciences
  • University of Tehran
    Research Assistant, 2011 - 2015
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Oxford, UK - Menlo Park, CA - Palo Alto, CA - Mountain View, CA - Tehran, Iran - Manchester, UK - Turkey - Dubai - Italy - Los Angeles, CA - Seattle, Washington
Links
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Story
Tagline
"Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go."--T. S. Eliot
Introduction
My interests lie in the following fields:
#Cognitive Science
#Computer Vision
#Neuroscience
#Brain Science
#Machine Learning
#Psychology
#Artificial Intelligence 
#Bio-inspired Algorithms
#Robotics
#Technology
#Quotes
#Photos



Education
  • University of Tehran
    Machine Intelligence and Robotics, 2015
    PhD.
  • Artificial Intelligence, 2008
  • Software Engineering, 2006
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Gender
Female
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