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Mongolian Yurts Direct
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Authentic Mongolian Yurts
Authentic Mongolian Yurts

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Eighth Session of the Intergovernmental Committee UNESCO added the Mongolian Ger (Yurt) to the list of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The Mongolian ger is unique in terms of its shape, size, materials used in its construction and decoration. It forms an integral part of life and for associated customs in Mongolia. 

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Have you seen one of these recently? Let us help you
1. It’s made in China
2. It’s made by Chinese people
3. It follows a unique Chinese design
4. It’s made entirely of Chinese sourced materials
5. It’s decorated with Chinese style decoration
6. All of its components have Chinese names i.e. dragon posts
7. It’s NOT used by nomads

Even if I hadn’t lived in Mongolia for 12 years I would think it’s a Chinese yurt. Everyone in China knows it’s not a real Mongolian yurt, and everyone in Mongolia would laugh at the idea that it was. So why are people in the UK being told that it is. My wife (she hold s a Mongolian passport) thinks no-body in the UK would be silly enough to be taken in by this sleight of hand. However, I’m constantly amazed by how many people are, they approach us wanting to buy replacement parts for their “Mongolian” yurt and are usually quite upset when told it’s not and that nothing we sell will fit it.
Why is this important? Apart from the people who bought something under false pretences, it’s about cultural heritage being subverted and cultural values being undermined. China has a long history of eradicating and then re-inventing the culture of its own ethnic minorities for the purposes of the state and the entertainment of the majority. This is a version of that, creating a “Mongolian Yurt” for Chinese tourists to enjoy when they visit the wilds of China.
America re-interpreted and made its own version of the yurt. Good luck to them. China has done the same, made its own version of a yurt, however it is not a Mongolian yurt but a Chinese one.



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It’s been a while since the last post. We are going to talk about yurt manufacturing and yurt quality. Although we often talk about quality we do not often talk about manufacturing in Mongolia. So in no particular order we are going to run through a few things that I think make us different from the rest.
Wood. Our luxury yurts are made from a solid larch frame. Siberian larch is not technically a hard wood, but given the fact that it grows in Siberia where the growing season is very short, it grows slowly, like a hardwood, with the tree rings very close together. So we would refer to it as a virtual hardwood. Wood suppliers in Mongolia will not supply kiln dried larch as it takes too long to dry so we are forced to do it ourselves. In our case this means air drying. Luckily for us Mongolia is an extremely dry climate. We cut our roof poles and then stack them in a shipping container to dry. One 20ft shipping container will accommodate roughly 5,000 roof poles. We ensure good airflow. They will then be left to dry for roughly two years. Why two years. Because we have been doing this 12 years and we know that it takes two years to guarantee that the whole container is dry and ready for use. For this reason for most yurt components involving larch we work 2 years in advance. If you have one of our yurts, next time you touch a roof pole please think about not only the level of skill gone into shaping, painting and decorating it but also the level of preparation and planning as well.
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2016-08-08
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Traditional Mongolian Felt Making
Wool felt is an amazing material. Light, warm, strong, retains its shape for decades, flame retardant and self-extinguishing, breathable, self-wicking and waterproof to a degree. It is also a renewable and environmentally friendly resource, it really is a wonder material. No wonder nomads use it to cover their yurts and make items of clothing and footwear. But how is it made? In Mongolia it is still made the same way as it was made hundreds if not thousands of years ago. This short video shows you how.

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A life well-travelled (part II)
The central Asian steppe is one of the most fertile places on earth. However it is also one of the harshest environments on earth with the biggest temperature ranges of anywhere. +40 in summer and -50 in winter. In this harsh environment a nomads biggest fear is Dzud. Dzud is a Mongolian term for a severe winter in which large number of livestock die, primarily due to starvation or directly from the cold. This years dzud cost 9,000 families their entire heard and a further 33,000 half their herd. Nomadism teaches you to be tough, self-reliant and humble, some would say religious in the face of mother nature.
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2016-04-13
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A life well-travelled (Part I)
It’s difficult for many of us that live in sedentary cultures to imagine what a nomadic lifestyle is like. Not attached to any particular piece of land or building. There is no commute to work in the mornings and there is no salary at the end of the month. You become much more attune to the seasons as they dictate what you do and sometimes where you go. But ultimately it’s just you, your family (and a large herd of animals) in the big wide world. It’s a sometimes harsh but often beautiful way to live a life.
Here is part one of a selection of photo’s that we feel give a glimpse into this extraordinary way of life.
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2016-03-23
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We recently introduced a new range of budget beating yurts we are calling Eco yurts. The aim was to bring all that is best about Mongolian Yurts and bring them to people at budget beating prices. The No.4 size yurt (5 meters or 16 feet in diameter) you can see here is one of the smallest in our range but starts at £2,495 ex. Vat. This is the cheapest in the UK today and hopefully will make these amazing structures available to many more people. Please see our website for more details www.yurtsdirect.com
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2016-03-23
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One of the (many) great things about yurts is that they can go just about anywhere a person can go. And once there they offer a level of comfort and amenity that few other structures can match. This is immediately apparent if you visit Mongolia, a vast, open country that would be inaccessible to most forms of tourism if it were not for the yurt and yurt camps sites that are dotted throughout the countryside. Some of them with the most amazing natural vistas.
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Yurts really are unlike any other "tent" you care to mention, and we feel they are the reason the glamping boom grew as big as it has. How can you compare an aerodynamic circular tent that is insulated, heated, dry and offers all the space and comforts of any room you'd have at home. We are of course biased but nevertheless feel we are right, long live the yurt.
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Climate change affects us all and is especially noticeable in Mongolia where winters are warmer and summers are cooler. There is also less rain, meaning large areas suffer from desertification. However there are success stories as well. This picture shows a before and after of an area where a local nomad family lives.
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