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Yuan LIU
Works at Silver Spring Networks
Attended Chinese Academy of Sciences
Lives in Mountain View
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Yuan LIU

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(In the past, I had been quick to post from such events. Blame the braindead "new" Google+ and Google Photos that took away location from its iOS apps. These super smart data freaks must have realised that location is an important aspect that stimulates engagement on their stab at Facebook. Evidently, their need to defeat iOS is greater than their desire to gain against Facebook.)

When my daughter realised that some of her peers did not know what Maker Faire was, she "felt sad for them." Then, when a neighbour expressed puzzlement as I explained that we were going to Maker Faire, I was frustrated by myself. Having been to the faire in the past three years, I thought I had no problem explaining what it is - so I tried. Every word came out bland. I am sure that my neighbour didn't get any idea what "a festivity for makers - eh, people who make all kind of stuff" is.

Gee. How could I explain it in a few words that really count? After we hopped onto the train (on which the conductor always says "Makers' Faire", year after year), a Makezine journalist's description suddenly resurfaced: The biggest freak show on Earth. How easy? If you are a freak, you would already have known. If not, your curiosity would easily be aroused.

Here are some more freakish scenes from "the biggest freak show on Earth" - eh, I mean "the greatest show (and tell) on Earth" as the organisers call it, including the "decorated" SUV with a sticker that reads "Do not try this at home (while your parents are watching)", a 10ft (3m) tall 3D printer, a man fitting into some terribly cumbersome wooden mobile in order to look like a robot...

Also two Google Photos productions for each of the days. I learned that the "movies" Photos create for you is different from "animation" you ask Photos to create. The former has this old film look and feel, and a usually cheeky music. "Animation", on the other hand, is plain animated GIF. Oh well.
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Got pencil? (Got time?)
 
Pencil art/carving looks much less tedious sped up
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Mars in line with Earth once every two years. Too bad iPhone can't catch the colour, never mind bad focus. All viewed with the spherical 76mm FirstScope.

The first picture was last taken with a 2x Barlow lens over a 4mm eyepiece. This doesn't give any more details but makes a bigger smudge. The second was viewed with a 25mm eyepiece, the smallest smudge of them all. I also tried to use a neutral filter on a 10mm in order to reduce glare. It makes the colour more obvious but doesn't help iPhone. 
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"I can do it by myself. You must let me!" So my bike arrived at my door in time for Maker Faire. (In fact I ordered the bike to go to Maker Faire months after someone removed my unlocked old one.) She insisted to carry the box inside and unbox it. But unlike with her own bike, she left the making to me.

This deeply discounted cruiser comes bundled with many accessaries that could easily add a hundred or two US dollars. (Selling skeleton bikes is the strangest merchandising I notice in the U.S. In China, a frame and two wheels do not a bicycle make. After discount, my "fully equipped" bike is cheaper than her bare-bones, smaller bike.) Most accessaries come preassembled. But the front fender alone costed me many more hours in trial and error.

All in the spirit of Maker Faire, I guess.
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Yuan LIU

Discussion  - 
 
Physical technology, physical sciences, and physical activities bring out that inventor in children.
 
Hackerlings is all about learning. We learned a lot from our kids and with our kids at the 5/14 meeting.

In the previous meeting, we asked kids to get "ghost readings" from different locations using the "ghost detectors" they brought home. The discoveries were truly surprising. Who thought an array of LEDs on the wooden table would dance with tapping foot on the carpet? (No strings attached. No motion sensor.) If that is not enough, imagine an open test probe in midair driving an LCD as feet scrubs carpet. Wait. No need to imagine - just watch. When was the last time your school lab or museum make you prove that we are under constant barrage from static electricity, with your own hands?

This valuable lesson about our post-industrial living space also gave a perfect segue way to "flowing" electricity - electric current, power, and energy. Our demonstration of Ohm's Law ended with balloons popping at different voltages. Hackerlings even tried to build an Arduino-controlled popping machine. Alas, our circuit wasn't properly designed for our amplifier. Don't you hate to waste all this hiding behind chairs? (Summer homework for the grownup assigned.)

No matter. Kids still had balloons to pop so they manually turned up the current and popped them! What a fun way to end our school year.
Mountain View Hackerlings Meeting 2016-05-14 (12 photos)
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Yuan LIU

❖ Technology  - 
 
 
Now you can be much closer to being Ironman for < US$500. At first, I thought this was just another Sprout or one of countless projection virtual keyboards. The title picture chosen by eeDesignIt didn't little to convey the profoundness of the advancement. (This one is slightly better.) In no exaggeration, this is a giant step toward that Ironman virtual interface. Well done, Shanghai Easi!
Imagine interacting with your wall or desk in the same way you would your smartphone or tablet. Thanks to a mini-projector called Lazertouch, that may actually be a possibility. The Lazertouch, created by China-based Shanghai Easi Computer Technology is different from the projector technology you were familiar with in school or the kind you currently use in the office — if any these days. Instead, this projector turns the projection screen...
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Obstruction of justice "didn’t have to be a problem if everyone was a good team player." (At covering up.)

This was a hard read, because I had to do it on the phone. (Because I hate using Twitter on laptop - because I simply hate using Twitter. Umph📛) But another reason is because this is such a fine example of quality journalism, of quality writing in general that I couldn't rush it over as I often do on the phone.
For those who say @Snowden should have used official channels, @guardian reports system "punished: whistleblowers http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/may/22/how-pentagon-punished-nsa-whistleblowers … The Guardian. Embedded image ...
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This Chrome Experiment depicts the location of 119,617 nearby stars derived from multiple scientific sources. The nearest 87 stars in our stellar neighborhood are individually identified and fully zoomable. Zooming all the way out reveals our Milky Way Galaxy, which is estimated to contain between 100-400 billion stars.

#NASA #ESA #Space #DataViz #Visualization #Satellite #Galaxy #Star #Stellar
An interactive 3D visualization of the stellar neighborhood, including over 100,000 nearby stars. Created for the Google Chrome web browser.
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Wire your finder's fees to +Terris Linenbach 
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Yuan LIU

❖ STEM Education  - 
 
Egg math rhapsody: How to approach a real-world question with built-in ambiguity?
 
Why egg math? Leave alone the why for now. Let us get to the how first. In order to know how, one must know what.

Known: Jumbo's waist: Ø46.8mm; medium's waist: Ø41.9mm. Question: How much bigger is Jumbo compared to Medium?

To younger children, the question can be ambiguous or even confusing. But ambiguity is inherent in the real world. Do not get me wrong: Formulation of mathematic question from the "real world" is a higher level skill, a skill that goes beyond modeling. (The latter of which grade schools do teach.) I am not proposing to add this to your SAT. (Don't even add to GRE. Seriously. I see lawsuits on the wall if GRE adds questions like this. After acceptance, however, graduate students routinely get such from their supervisors.) But I am proposing that every mom and dad do this with your children.

At first look - metaphorically and literally speaking, the difference is marginal. 46.8mm - 41.9mm = 4.9mm. Obviously this is not the answer to the question. (Some ingenious children may even get to circumference. But that's still not the question.) Lesson #1: It is not a big stretch for children to understand that real world questions about "how much bigger" is often about fractional comparison. In fractions, 4.9mm is merely 12% of 41.9mm. Is Jumbo 12% larger than Medium? (Alternatively, is Medium 10% smaller than Jumbo?)

Enter practicality as a guidance to scientific problem solving. In the 18th century, European traders discovered that goods they brought from tropical Africa weighed less in their home port. Did someone cheat them on scales? Did someone stole the goods at sea? After careful calibrations, they finally realised that they were using a questionable assumption that content of goods was proportional to their weight. Thus was born the scientific concept of mass. Why? Because what the traders truly care was how much content was in the goods, not how much force the Earth pulls on them.

Lesson #2: Similarly, when someone asks "how much bigger is a jumbo egg than a medium one," the person is perhaps not interested in Humpty-Dumpty's waistline, but interested in its nutritional value, which is proportional to its mass, which is proportional to its volume.

Now, an egg is not a perfect sphere or a perfect cube whose volume can be computed by a single dimension. Can we determine the egg's volume from mere waist measurement?

This brings us back to Lesson #1: fractional (or relative) comparison. Although we do not have sufficient measurements in order to determine their absolute volumes, they have similar geometries, therefore it is sufficient to compare the volumes in fraction.

On to math. Lesson #3: Volume of similar shapes (not restricted to oval) is proportional to the cube of any single dimension. (At their age, this has to be taken with a leap of mathematical faith. But then, a lot of what they learn at the age are presented as mathematical/geometrical facts, without proof.) Fractional difference between volumes can thus be established by (D2^3 - D1^3)/D1^3 = (D2/D1)^3 - 1. In our case, (46.8/41.9)^3 - 1 = 39%. (Without algebra, there is no need to present the general formula.)

So, a Jumbo egg is 39% larger than a Medium egg in nutritional value, for which we make payment.

That is a very long and winding way to compare two lousy eggs! Why the trouble? Review of the three lessons:
1. The person who asks "how much bigger is this egg than the other egg" is probably interested in relative comparison, a fraction.
2. The person who asks "how much bigger is this egg than the other egg" is probably interested in volume, not waistline.
3. Volume of similar shapes is proportional to cube of any one of its linear dimensions. (Extension: Area of similar shapes is proportional to square of any one of its linear dimensions.)

In the real world, you must combine practicality with mathematical modeling in order to answer a question. No grade school is ever going to teach this.

The big deal? My local grocer had a sale: a dozen medium eggs for less than 1/2 the price of jumbo eggs. I told my daughter that we should buy medium instead of our usual faire of jumbo. Lesson #4: I told her that we pay for nutrition, not for size. "With this promotion, if we eat two medium eggs, we get more nutrition than from one jumbo but pay less," said I. But is my gut feeling about sizes justified? After all, I did not bring USDA with me on a shopping trip. This little exercise confirms my gut feeling.

Wait! The statistician in you must be crying out. How can you derive relative sizing from a random sample from two cartons and claim this is scientific? The two cartons are not even from the same brand. How'd you know they are even comparable? How do you account for dissimilarities in shape? OK. This is not rocket science, just an estimation. But this is hands-on. Something your child can easily do at home in one minute. And comparability between brands is established by trade regulations.

How far is it from real science? USDA defines minimum net weight per dozen in http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/egg-products-preparation/shell-eggs-from-farm-to-table/#17. Jumbo: 30 oz; Medium: 21 oz. If both just register at the minimum, the increase would be 43%; if the Jumbo registers at the minimum and the Medium falls just 1oz below Large (minimum 24oz), that would make an increase of 30%. As Jumbo does not have an upper limit, let's just say that chickens are not ostriches and cap the difference at 48%. Our home math isn't too shabby. (Dissimilarities are not accounted for, although a true nerd can prove that shape variation is a very minor contributor, commercially speaking.)

The next time your grocer sells medium eggs at <1/2 the price of jumbo, jump on it!
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Yuan LIU

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Why egg math? Leave alone the why for now. Let us get to the how first. In order to know how, one must know what.

Known: Jumbo's waist: Ø46.8mm; medium's waist: Ø41.9mm. Question: How much bigger is Jumbo compared to Medium?

To younger children, the question can be ambiguous or even confusing. But ambiguity is inherent in the real world. Do not get me wrong: Formulation of mathematic question from the "real world" is a higher level skill, a skill that goes beyond modeling. (The latter of which grade schools do teach.) I am not proposing to add this to your SAT. (Don't even add to GRE. Seriously. I see lawsuits on the wall if GRE adds questions like this. After acceptance, however, graduate students routinely get such from their supervisors.) But I am proposing that every mom and dad do this with your children.

At first look - metaphorically and literally speaking, the difference is marginal. 46.8mm - 41.9mm = 4.9mm. Obviously this is not the answer to the question. (Some ingenious children may even get to circumference. But that's still not the question.) Lesson #1: It is not a big stretch for children to understand that real world questions about "how much bigger" is often about fractional comparison. In fractions, 4.9mm is merely 12% of 41.9mm. Is Jumbo 12% larger than Medium? (Alternatively, is Medium 10% smaller than Jumbo?)

Enter practicality as a guidance to scientific problem solving. In the 18th century, European traders discovered that goods they brought from tropical Africa weighed less in their home port. Did someone cheat them on scales? Did someone stole the goods at sea? After careful calibrations, they finally realised that they were using a questionable assumption that content of goods was proportional to their weight. Thus was born the scientific concept of mass. Why? Because what the traders truly care was how much content was in the goods, not how much force the Earth pulls on them.

Lesson #2: Similarly, when someone asks "how much bigger is a jumbo egg than a medium one," the person is perhaps not interested in Humpty-Dumpty's waistline, but interested in its nutritional value, which is proportional to its mass, which is proportional to its volume.

Now, an egg is not a perfect sphere or a perfect cube whose volume can be computed by a single dimension. Can we determine the egg's volume from mere waist measurement?

This brings us back to Lesson #1: fractional (or relative) comparison. Although we do not have sufficient measurements in order to determine their absolute volumes, they have similar geometries, therefore it is sufficient to compare the volumes in fraction.

On to math. Lesson #3: Volume of similar shapes (not restricted to oval) is proportional to the cube of any single dimension. (At their age, this has to be taken with a leap of mathematical faith. But then, a lot of what they learn at the age are presented as mathematical/geometrical facts, without proof.) Fractional difference between volumes can thus be established by (D2^3 - D1^3)/D1^3 = (D2/D1)^3 - 1. In our case, (46.8/41.9)^3 - 1 = 39%. (Without algebra, there is no need to present the general formula.)

So, a Jumbo egg is 39% larger than a Medium egg in nutritional value, for which we make payment.

That is a very long and winding way to compare two lousy eggs! Why the trouble? Review of the three lessons:
1. The person who asks "how much bigger is this egg than the other egg" is probably interested in relative comparison, a fraction.
2. The person who asks "how much bigger is this egg than the other egg" is probably interested in volume, not waistline.
3. Volume of similar shapes is proportional to cube of any one of its linear dimensions. (Extension: Area of similar shapes is proportional to square of any one of its linear dimensions.)

In the real world, you must combine practicality with mathematical modeling in order to answer a question. No grade school is ever going to teach this.

The big deal? My local grocer had a sale: a dozen medium eggs for less than 1/2 the price of jumbo eggs. I told my daughter that we should buy medium instead of our usual faire of jumbo. Lesson #4: I told her that we pay for nutrition, not for size. "With this promotion, if we eat two medium eggs, we get more nutrition than from one jumbo but pay less," said I. But is my gut feeling about sizes justified? After all, I did not bring USDA with me on a shopping trip. This little exercise confirms my gut feeling.

Wait! The statistician in you must be crying out. How can you derive relative sizing from a random sample from two cartons and claim this is scientific? The two cartons are not even from the same brand. How'd you know they are even comparable? How do you account for dissimilarities in shape? OK. This is not rocket science, just an estimation. But this is hands-on. Something your child can easily do at home in one minute. And comparability between brands is established by trade regulations.

How far is it from real science? USDA defines minimum net weight per dozen in http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/egg-products-preparation/shell-eggs-from-farm-to-table/#17. Jumbo: 30 oz; Medium: 21 oz. If both just register at the minimum, the increase would be 43%; if the Jumbo registers at the minimum and the Medium falls just 1oz below Large (minimum 24oz), that would make an increase of 30%. As Jumbo does not have an upper limit, let's just say that chickens are not ostriches and cap the difference at 48%. Our home math isn't too shabby. (Dissimilarities are not accounted for, although a true nerd can prove that shape variation is a very minor contributor, commercially speaking.)

The next time your grocer sells medium eggs at <1/2 the price of jumbo, jump on it!
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Yuan LIU

Discussion  - 
 
Brightness may be a disadvantage compared to matrix displays in everyday classroom use, but functionally it beats all technologies deployed in today's classrooms.
 
Now you can be much closer to being Ironman for < US$500. At first, I thought this was just another Sprout or one of countless projection virtual keyboards. The title picture chosen by eeDesignIt didn't little to convey the profoundness of the advancement. (This one is slightly better.) In no exaggeration, this is a giant step toward that Ironman virtual interface. Well done, Shanghai Easi!
Imagine interacting with your wall or desk in the same way you would your smartphone or tablet. Thanks to a mini-projector called Lazertouch, that may actually be a possibility. The Lazertouch, created by China-based Shanghai Easi Computer Technology is different from the projector technology you were familiar with in school or the kind you currently use in the office — if any these days. Instead, this projector turns the projection screen...
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Now you can be much closer to being Ironman for < US$500. At first, I thought this was just another Sprout or one of countless projection virtual keyboards. The title picture chosen by eeDesignIt didn't little to convey the profoundness of the advancement. (This one is slightly better.) In no exaggeration, this is a giant step toward that Ironman virtual interface. Well done, Shanghai Easi!
Imagine interacting with your wall or desk in the same way you would your smartphone or tablet. Thanks to a mini-projector called Lazertouch, that may actually be a possibility. The Lazertouch, created by China-based Shanghai Easi Computer Technology is different from the projector technology you were familiar with in school or the kind you currently use in the office — if any these days. Instead, this projector turns the projection screen...
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Yuan's Collections
People
Have him in circles
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Mountain View
Previously
Montreal - Beijing - Chengdu
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Work
Employment
  • Silver Spring Networks
    2010 - present
  • Chinese Information and Networking Association (CINA)
  • Electronic Data Systems
    2002 - 2010
  • Nuasis Corp
    2000 - 2002
  • ChiTech
  • Sunrise Chinese Library (太阳升)
  • China News Digest (CND)/华夏文摘
  • Memorial University of Newfoundland
  • McGill University
  • Concordia University
  • Université de Sherbrooke
  • Institute of Acoustics
Education
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    Acoustics
    Ph.D., M.Sc.
  • Sichuan University
    Physics
    B.Sc.
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Yuan LIU's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
The Low-Down: Why It's So Hard To Succeed In Silicon Valley If You Grew ...
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Jon Low decodes what’s happening at the intersection of business, technology, and public policy.

Weekends in hell: day trippers making life tough for residents of popula...
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Chinese e-commerce giants JD.com and Alibaba may have landed the rights to Taylor Swift's fashion line, but some of her offerings may prove

Mountain View Hackerlings
sites.google.com

Educational nonprofit to teach STEAM to children by hacking and tinkering. Turn your children's curiosity into creativity.

DVCon Highlights: Software, Complexity, and Moore's Law | Systems Design...
chipdesignmag.com

Aart de Geus keynote and the Art or Science Panel prove that DVCon is not just for verification engineers.

What’s in a name: when is the IoT Industrie 4.0? | Systems Design Engine...
chipdesignmag.com

When does the IoT become Industrie 4.0, wonders Caroline Hayes. National Instruments' NI Days is a good grounding for establishing definitio

Physical Analytics Part 1: Tracking Your Home with Google Analytics | Ni...
nicomiceli.com

All those things you couldn’t track, you now can! No seriously, all those things. * sigh * Yes Internet, you can track your cat. I tracked t

Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff
www.latimes.com

Salesforce.com Chief Executive Marc Benioff wants tech companies to respond to the backlash in San Francisco by giving more back to the comm

Marc Benioff joins critics of tech industry 'stinginess' in S.F.
www.latimes.com

SAN FRANCISCO -- If you want to know how bad the tech backlash has gotten in this city, consider that the man who happens to run the city's

Wolverton: These gifts might be educational, but your kids will call the...
www.mercurynews.com

If you’re looking for something this holiday season to get your kids excited about science and technology, here are some ideas.

Google shuts down iGoogle, which joins long line of shuttered services
www.mercurynews.com

Google kicked off November by killing off one of its little-used features. The Mountain Viewcompany got rid of iGoogle, a tool that let user

BE MAKER! KIT plus FREE lessons on electronics, from Zero to Internet of...
www.indiegogo.com

After the incredible success of my first campaign, I want to change the way people learn electronics; this is for EVERYONE!

Retirement Planner: Target-date funds not a good investment strategy
www.mercurynews.com

If ignorance is bliss, then target retirement date funds have arrived just in time for those who are seeking that state of mind.

Review: Refinements make Apple's Mavericks well worth the upgrade
www.mercurynews.com

Apple's new Mac operating system, dubbed Mavericks, has plenty of modest refinements that add up to a system well worth the upgrade -- even

Facebook kills 100 startups with new collaborative photo album feature
venturebeat.com

This is massively convenient and tons of fun for the billion-plus users of Facebook. For entrepreneurs who've built photo-sharing apps, not

Location, location, location. It may not be as close to cross-country ski area as Red Wolf Lodge is, or has as nice rooms as the latter. But 500m to cable car is a great feature - closer than from Red Wolf if you walk. They even operates a free shuttle every 5 to 15 minutes! Rooms can be awkward at first. (Converted from hotel rooms) My unit in my first visit had bed room at door, with half kitchen, half living room inside. But can't complain about the views. On my later visits, the door opens to the half kitchen, half living room. The half kitchen, though tiny, is highly functional for casual meals. Bathroom is also tiny but highly functional. Room equipment is very well maintained except the noisy air conditioner on my first visit. (They couldn't really fix it at the time.) I have not had this problem in later visits. The building shows some age but generally well upkept. The only other problem I found was ants during my last visit. Maintenance came with some sprays but that did not solve the problem. If you ski, the Inn Store just steps away from the cable car offers extremely competitive rental - ask for discount card or order online. You can check your ski at the office. Staff is very courteous and helpful. They also organize various activities for skiers and non-skiers. O can you see that I'm posting via free Wi-Fi? (That was several years ago. Now they charge a daily fee to cover the shuttle, ski check, Wi-Fi and stuff.)
• • •
Public - 2 weeks ago
reviewed 2 weeks ago
I cannot claim this a best kept secret, although the location is rather secluded. But they have enough return customers like myself who can't get enough of them. Food: Top pho in the area bar none. Their meat is always well selected and prepared, no cutting corners like so many others. No tissues that are hard to chew. No corners and edges that taste stale. Cooking is consistent whenever you visit. And taste simply has no competition locally. (I still think Pho Bang New York of Montreal the best, though I haven't visited them since coming to know Pho Nam.) Portion is also very generous compared to local competition. (Again, Pho Bang New York easily tops.) Interior: Furnishing is adequate, well maintained although rather basic, except the carpet. Carpet is rather undermaintained. I believe that's what gives the unpleasant interior smell. Tucked into a nondescript strip mall, they always keep otherwise large windows shuttered. This may have added to the smell. Although Pho Nam restaurants use similar decorations, the one on El Camino looks much better. This one perhaps has the most faded wall decorations, although the intricate interaction between artificial lights and whatever sunlight that escapes the shutters can make the space feel cozier than a fast food place. Right, this is a sit-down fast food place. Seating is typical train couches. Service: Even though they seat you and take your orders, your pho usually comes out faster than In-and-Out burger if you know what you wanted in advance. (My favourites are #1 and #4 from the menu.) On the other hand, they do have dishes, sides, and specialty drinks in addition to some 20 phos. (I really just go there for pho so I cannot comment on food other than pho. (I only tried spring rolls. Although I am fond of Vietnamese rolls, theirs is not the best.) Like in many oriental restaurants, they serve complimentary hot tea if you don't want iced water. (Nothing fancy about the tea but better than many similar restaurants, some of them would gladly charge you for this.) After the meal, you go to the counter to view your bill and pay. (They used to accept credit cards, but no longer.) Servers' are cordial and prompt, just don't expect much in food recommendations. Warning: They can be swamped during weekday lunches. What else? Oh. Do not use the restroom unless you have to. (OK, this applies universally to similar establishments, even applies to some trendy Chinese restaurants.) However, the restroom is reasonably clean. I've been to two other Pho Nam's in the area (as well as many other pho places). This one is the best among them, and serves the best pho in the area bar none. Their bill shows they are shop #4, so they must have at least one location that I haven't visited.
• • •
Public - 2 weeks ago
reviewed 2 weeks ago
We came in around 1pm on Black Friday and got seated immediately by the very friendly head waitress. But soon after, a line built up. We ordered two fish and chips, one deep-fried calamari meal, and a guacamole platter as appetiser. It was a mistake for the three of us, for the appetiser includes a huge portion of french fries. All deep-fried entrées also include large portions of french fries and coleslaw. We couldn't finish all the food. So, all our foods are deep-fried. Let me say this: The fish pieces are good, but I do not like the batter and the frying. In fact, all deep-fried foods are disappointing at this beautifully decorated joint. Well, it may be a mistake not to order the fish taco of which they are famous. As I mentioned, a line built up soon after we were seated. Throughout the meal, it was very difficult to get attention of any waitress - of which there seemed to only have two. (They have a bar that has at least two bartenders.) Whereas the waitresses were warm and friendly, they just couldn't go around. And a couple times when a waitress promised to refill water but forgot afterward. In short, popular, good in decors, lag in food and service.
• • •
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
San Diego Zoo is an absolute treasure. I grew up less than 70 km (45 miles) from Wolong, the largest panda nature reserve. So Panda was not an attraction. Zoos in China also generally keep more species than a typical American zoo. But in education and entertainment value, there is no comparison. Construction, architecture and arts are also top notch. Wish I had more time there.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
16 reviews
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This is a real hidden gem in Auburn - or on route to your favourite Lake Tahoe destinations from Northern California. You can't go wrong with fish & chips here, although I've had better tartar sauce elsewhere. As a tourist, I'd go with cod, which costs a little more than catfish. The portion is generous - we've always had leftovers. Remember leftover French fries from some other restaurants, the staleness? Not those from Pelican's Roost! This is even more pronounced when you notice that the owners are first generation Korean immigrants. (In addition to fish and chips, they have a selection of American food like any typical American eatery.) The old lady in this family-owned joint is always warm and quick with service. (I've always come to the place after 1pm on a weekend so I can't tell about busier hours.) Seating is spacious, with intriguing retro decors indoors and an interesting "fresh air enclosed" seating area where you can go people watching - or car watching mostly, while eating. The latter is not your usual outdoor seating so you have to experience it to appreciate. I accidentally discovered this five years ago when I entered Auburn after 2pm. After eating at another Auburn gem for some years, I decided to bring my daughter, also a fish & chips lover, to this place last year. No regrets.
• • •
Public - 3 weeks ago
reviewed 3 weeks ago
This is not your fine dining parlour. You come here for the flavour, Northeastern Chinese which is rare in North America. The cuisine, heavily influenced by Korean, is not even mainstream in China. You won't usually get Northeastern in banquets. But Guan Dong House makes several Northeastern dishes that are very popular among Chinese. And they make them very well. As to service, I'd say it is average among Chinese restaurants. But if you show some connaisseur in Northeastern cuisine, the host will be very appreciative, and you can get better attention.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Crowded with lots of smiling ethnic Koreans. This is one thing I look for when trying a cuisine that I do not know. (Learned this from a San Francisco food critic about Chinese restaurant.) And SGD Tofu House draws me back. SGD Tofu House is very visible in the Korean strip, but not a flashy venue like Palace BBQ nearby. (And not charge a arm and leg, either.) It has one of a kind floor window on the outside, and rather simple decorations inside. In fact, the inside can be a little congested as the house's mainstays are tofu pot and bibimbap. These are the dishes I come for. One word: heavenly. Can't say I eat tofu pot and bibimbap often or in many places to form a studied and fair opinion. But every time I return to SGD Tofu House, I leave with that very satisfied feeling. Perhaps this is partially thanks to the family restaurant air. You can hear Korean front and back. In the end, though, it is your stomach - and tongue that have to judge.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago