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"Noble one, you should think of yourself as someone who is sick,
Of the Dharma as the remedy..."
  What to Do? The Four Metaphors   This is the fourth in a series of excerpts from Patrul Rinpoche’s classic introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, Words of My Perfect Teacher. We’re using the Yale University Press edition, translated by the Padmakara Translation Group. You can get the book for yourself if you wish. We are not following any …
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"With a wish to free all beings
I shall always go for refuge
to the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha
until I reach full enlightenment.

Enthused by wisdom and compassion,
today in the Buddha’s presence
I generate the Mind for Full Awakening
for the benefit of all sentient beings.

As long as space endures,
as long as sentient being remain,
until then, may I too remain
and dispel the miseries of the world."

For the last eight weeks we have looked at one verse per week of Geshe Langri Tangpa's Eight Verses for Training the Mind. And we close this nice walk through the text as His Holiness did at one of his teachings on the subject, with the short prayer Generating the Mind for Enlightenment.
You can see the full text of the Eight Verses at the link, along with His Holiness' commentary on both the Eight Verses and the prayer above:

http://www.yowangdu.com/tibetan-buddhism/eight-verses-for-training-the-mind.html 
Eight verses for training the mind: The classic lojong text by Geshe Langri Tangpa, with His Holiness the Dalai Lama's commentary.
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"Death cannot be fought off by any warrior, ordered away by the powerful, or paid off by the rich. Death leaves nowhere to run to, no place to hide, no refuge, no defender or guide. Death resists any recourse to skill or compassion. Once our life has run out, even if the Medicine Buddha himself were to appear in person he would be unable to delay our death.

So, reflect sincerely and meditate on how important it is from this very moment onwards never to slip into laziness and procrastination, but to practice the true Dharma, the only thing you can be sure will help at the moment of death."

From Patrul Rinpoche's Worlds of My Perfect Teacher.

See the full excerpt here:
Mini lessons from Patrul Rinpoche's Words of My Perfect Teacher, a classic introduction to Tibetan Buddhist Practice. Part 2
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In celebration of the 80th birthday of Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the Dalai Lama – born on July 6, 1935, we would like to take some time to express our deep gratitude that we live in a time when the world can receive his masterful teachings on compassion and nonviolence. We offer our prayers for his long life and hope for his joyful return to Tibet and to the Tibetan people longing for his presence.
Here's a collection of some of our favorite HHDL posts over the years:
His Holiness the Dalai Lama: A Photo gallery and collection of articles celebrating the life of the great 14th Dalai Lama.
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His Holiness the Sakya Trizin visiting the Gyuto Foundation in Richmond, California in April. There have been so many wonderful visitors this spring that we're still catching up on posting. See videos and a photo gallery at the post. 
HH Sakya Trizin: Photos of His Holiness the Sakya Trizin visiting California in 2015.
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New on YoWangdu: A photo gallery of His Holiness Gyalwa Karmapa's visit to California. Don't miss the link to the story of his remarkable escape from Tibet, in his own words. 
Karmapa Photos: Images of Gyalwa Karmapa, the 17th Karmapa from his 2015 tour of North America.
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This new post is the most important one we've sent this year, and long overdue. 

When we visited the Bylakuppe Tibetan Settlement in Southern India earlier this year, one day of that trip really stands out, and that’s the day the Lugsam Samduling Settlement Officer, Karma Damdul la, brought us by the Settlement’s Home for the Aged and Disabled. You might think that such a place would be depressing, but it wasn’t at all. When we left that day, both of us were deeply moved and inspired.

http://www.yowangdu.com/tibet-travel/tibet-charity.html
Tibet Charity: Elderly refugees in Bylakuppe who need help now. This lovely group of unsupported old folks in Bylakuppe need our help.
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Today on Ask YoWangdu, a traveler asks:

"Is it better to enter Tibet from Nepal or China?"

See our answer here: http://www.yowangdu.com/ask-yowangdu.html
  To keep a record of our weekly “Ask YoWangdu” posts on Facebook, we’ve created this page, which we will add to each week :-)   August 8, 2015   Is it better to enter Tibet from China or from Nepal?  Even without the current ongoing closure of the Tibet-Nepal border due to the April …
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Today is Choekhor Duchen, when we honor the Buddha Shakyamuni first turning the wheel of dharma by teaching the Four Noble Truths. See the full post, with video by HHDL and Samdhong Rinpoche's excellent teachings on this subject: 
Choekhor Duchen and the Four Noble Truths: Honoring the day that the Buddha Shakyamuni first turned the wheel of the dharma.
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New on YoWangdu: Post on the what is sometimes mistakenly called the Tibet "visa," not to be confused with the Tibet travel permit. And an answer to the question: can I mention Tibet when I apply for the visa? 
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A new post on YoWangdu to cut down on the overwhelm and confusion about Tibet travel permits:  http://www.yowangdu.com/tibet-travel/tibet-travel-permit.html
Tibet travel permit: Answers to your questions about getting the permission and documents you need to enter Tibet.
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A short list of great organizations on the ground in Nepal that you can donate to: 
Where to donate for the Nepal Earthquake: A short list of high-quality organizations on the ground in Nepal.
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  That's very insensitive +Salem Assaid.
   It also is misinformed: Buddha is not equated with the Creator. Nor is omnipotence its key trait, or what his teachings are about.
   And it is ill-thought too: would a compassionate being prioritise saving statues? Not really! It would save as many sentient beings as possible first.
   So instead of asking questions about what the Buddha does / did, maybe you should reflect on what you  do (or not)… This post is a call for you  to act compassionately towards other beings, out of a sense of shared humanity. Religious dogma doesn't have much relevance in such a context.
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Experience the Joys of Tibetan Culture
Introduction

The YoWangdu Tibetan Culture business and website focuses on Tibetan food, travel and spirituality, and is dedicated to the preservation and development of Tibetan culture and education.

YoWangdu is owned and operated by Lobsang Wangdu, a webmaster, experienced Tibetan cook, and digital photographer with many years of volunteer service for the Tibetan Association of Northern California.

Having long dreamed of using his photography and technical skills to run his own business, Lobsang created YoWangdu in 2009, with the mission of enabling visitors to experience the joys of Tibetan culture.

Lobsang thrives on making his clients happy with exceptional customer service, and is inspired by the motivation to contribute to much-needed education projects for Tibetans.

YoWangdu’s major product, the Tibetan Home Cooking eBook and video series, is based on Lobsang Wangdu’s original recipes, with great help from some friends who are wonderful Tibetan chefs. Lobsang learned to cook at a young age by watching his aunt and uncle in Tibet, and as he grew older, he assisted experienced Tibetan chefs, asking questions while he helped cook.

Lobsang has been making variations on the recipes in Tibetan Home Cooking for well over twenty years, and has acquired a wealth of experience along with his innate passion for making the people he cooks for happy.