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Yaroslav Bulatov
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Attended Oregon State University
Lives in San Francisco, CA
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Yaroslav Bulatov

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The study was real but engineered to give statistically significant result for benefit of chocolate (using multiple comparisons)
“Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. It made the front page of Bild, Europe’s largest daily newspaper, just beneath their update about the Germanwings crash. From there, it ricocheted around the internet and beyond, making news in more than 20 countries and half a dozen languages. It was discussed on tel...
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"journalists are becoming the de facto peer review system". Great article.
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Yaroslav Bulatov

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Some posters from ICLR I liked
Some ICLR posters that caught my eye: [larger image] Very simple to implement idea that gives impressive results. They force two groups of units to be uncorrelated by penalizing their cross covariance. When the first group ...
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There's been a recent spate of quantum ML algorithms, but a few pieces are still missing to make them work (even if we had quantum computers) -- Scott Aaronson "Quantum Machine Learning Algorithms: Read the Fine Print" -- http://www.scottaaronson.com/papers/qml.pdf
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I would so much prefer people prove we can do basic stuff with QC before jumping off to the interesting stuff.
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A secret code

This is the Golay code.  Each row in this picture shows a string of 24 bits.  There are 12 rows.  If you look at any two rows, you'll see they differ in at least 8 places.

Here's how to get the Golay code.  Take a 12 x 12 square of bits with all 0's except for 1's down the diagonal - you can see that at left here.  Take another 12 x 12 square of bits that tells you when two faces of a dodecahedron share an edge: 0 if they do, 1 if they don't.  Stick these squares together and you get the Golay code!

Some guys around here keep asking if the math I talk about is good for anything.  In this case it is! 

The Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft needed to transmit hundreds of color pictures of Jupiter and Saturn in their 1979, 1980, and 1981 fly-bys.   They had very little bandwidth, so they needed a good error-correcting code.  They used the Golay code! 

The point is that we can use the rows of this picture as code words.  If we take some rows and add them - adding each entry separately, mod 2 - we get more code words.  We get a total of 2^12 = 4096 code words. 

These code words have a cool property: it takes at least 8 errors to turn any code word into any other.   So, we say the Hamming distance between any two code words is at least 8.   In fact, the Golay code is the only code with 12-bit code words where the Hamming distance between any two is at least 8.

There's a whole theory of codes like this, and this is an especially good one.  You can transmit 12 bits of data with 24 bits... but since the Hamming distance between code words is big, someone can understand what you meant even if there are lots of errors!  So, the Golay code is useful for transmitting data in a noisy environment.

But the reason I like the Golay code is that it has a big and important symmetry group.  Its symmetry group is called M24 - one of the amazing things called Mathieu groups.    It has

24 x 23 x 22 x 21 x 20 x 48 = 244,823,040

elements.   It's connected to many other symmetrical things in math: for example, it acts as symmetries of the Leech lattice, the densest way to pack balls in 24 dimensions.

To be more precise, this code here is called the extended binary Golay code.  You can learn more about it here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_Golay_code

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathieu_group

Puzzle: I said the symmetry group of this code is M24.  But what do I mean, exactly, by a 'symmetry' of this code?

The extended binary Golay code is not only good for outer space.  In 1993, the US government issued standards for high frequency radio systems.  They require using this code for "forwards error correction" in "automatic link establishment"!  See page 51 here:

http://hflink.com/standards/FED_STD_1045A.pdf
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I am very proud of the work our team has done on the Eigen open source matrix library this past year. Try out the development (3.3) branch for yourself, you'll likely find that it's the fastest BLAS there is on modern Intel CPUs. Plus it's under a very open license, portable, flexible, and has a very intuitive C++ API.
Eigen 3.2.2 has been released on August 4, 2014. This is a maintenance release with many bug fixes since the release of 3.2.1 five months ago. In particular, this release includes various numerical improvements in JacobiSVD, LDLT, BiCGSTAB, and ColPivHouseholderQR. There are also some limited ...
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+CVPR 2014  papers list is out !
Learning, recognition, segmentation ... manifold and depth are more and more present.
http://www.pamitc.org/cvpr14/accepted_papers.php
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spoiler: it's the russians
 
If a vast and lavishly appointed house in Manhattan—a palace nearly double the size of the White House—were being redeveloped on the edge of Central Park, New Yorkers would want to know who lived there. Londoners are equally inquisitive, and concerted efforts have been made to uncover the identity of Witanhurst’s owners
The house’s owners have built a vast basement that amounts to an underground village. Credit Illustration by Michael Kirkham
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I just discovered the computational linguistics olympiad. These problems are a lot of fun. I tried some easy ones and they were easy. So I jumped to a hard one and now I'm stuck. Have fun!

(Don't post any spoilers, I haven't solved it myself yet. Brag about it if you have solved it though!)

http://www.ioling.org
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A map from "Who is afraid of peer review". A fake cancer research paper was sent to 304 author-fee funded journals and 157 accepted. Red on map indicates location of publisher/bank http://scicomm.scimagdev.org/
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Too bad they used a globe viewer; this is a case where a flattened map would be much more informative.
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Deep Learning bibliography of 2014:
http://memkite.com/deep-learning-bibliography/
DeepLearning.University – An Annotated Deep Learning Bibliography. by: Amund Tveit*, Torbjørn Morland and Thomas Brox Røst · memkite.com – Deeplearning.Education. *Email: amund@memkite.com – @atveit. Abstract. DeepLearning.University is an annotated bibliography of recent publications (2014-) ...
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Stephen Pinker on standardized testing and Ivy League. At Harvard, 5-10% of students are selected based on academic merit. The rest are selected "holistically"

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119321/harvard-ivy-league-should-judge-students-standardized-tests

"A skilled professional I know had to turn down an important freelance assignment because of a recurring commitment to chauffeur her son to a resumé-building “social action” assignment required by his high school. This involved driving the boy for 45 minutes to a community center, cooling her heels while he sorted used clothing for charity, and driving him back—forgoing income which, judiciously donated, could have fed, clothed, and inoculated an African village. The dubious “lessons” of this forced labor as an overqualified ragpicker are that children are entitled to treat their mothers’ time as worth nothing, that you can make the world a better place by destroying economic value, and that the moral worth of an action should be measured by the conspicuousness of the sacrifice rather than the gain to the beneficiary."
The Ivy League is broken and only standardized tests can fix it.
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Summary of last week's Stochastic Gradient Methods workshop: http://yaroslavvb.blogspot.com/2014/03/stochastic-gradient-methods-2014.html
Last week I attended Stochastic Gradient Methods workshop held at UCLA's IPAM . Surprisingly, there's still quite a bit of activity and unsolved questions around what is essentially, minimizing a quadratic function. In 2009 S...
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Work
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, present
    Google Brain
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Currently
San Francisco, CA
Previously
Corvallis, OR - London, England - St.Petersburg, Russia
Story
Tagline
Teaching machines to learn
Introduction
Leningrad>London>Oregon>San Francisco
Education
  • Oregon State University
    Computer Science
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Gender
Male
Birthday
July 5, 1980