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Xianzhong Lau
Worked at University of Melbourne
Attends University of Melbourne
Lives in Melbourne
2,258 followers|184,175 views
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Xianzhong Lau

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This video made me teary eyed. Beautiful story. (Make sure you turn on closed captioning so you get subtitles)
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Xianzhong Lau

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Thalidomide - the Dr Jekyll & My Hyde drug responsible for the tragedy of a generation of individuals with birth defects and the reformation of global drug safety and regulation to its present stringency.
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And you think drug companies learned their lesson? They're driven by greed. There are plenty of drugs out there that have not been properly researched. Why are some drugs pulled from the market? 
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Xianzhong Lau

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Excited for my iPhone friends that iOS is finally catching up with Android, in terms of features and design. Hate the look of those stock icons though.
 
Android is that you?!


#wwdc   #apple   #ios   #ios7   #google   #iphone   #ipad
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My constructive point is that one is controlled by a single organisation who set its destiny and determine what is and is not allowed. The other is determined collectively and does not rely on any one organisation to keep it developing. Even without Google Android would still progress in one form or another simply out of community interest.
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Itch may be a distinct sensation, initiated by a dedicated neural circuit that links cells in the periphery of the body to the brain, instead of being a low-level form of pain, a study in mice suggests.

Researchers identified a hormone, natriuretic polypeptide b (Nppb), produced by a subset of sensory neurons in mice, was responsible for delivering itchy sensations to neurons in the spinal cord that routes the signal to the brain.
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Have him in circles
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Xianzhong Lau

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Pre-flight safety videos are getting really creative these days.
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good! :)
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Wow... This Lego model looks insane!
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8 nutrition myths debunked by clinical research.
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Great Post!!
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Look up in the sky tonight.
 
This weekend, skywatchers around the world will get to see Mercury, Venus, and Jupiter meet in the sky—an event which won't be repeated until 2026. Find out how to see it. 
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Xianzhong Lau

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Down Syndrome Day

Today, 3/21, is World Down Syndrome Day. Also known as Trisomy 21, because it involves three copies of chromosome 21 instead of the usual two (see image), Down syndrome is the most complex of genetic disorders that is compatible with survival (other trisomies are more common, but are lethal). Even Down syndrome is associated with ~50% lethality of embryos. In the US, 1 in 691 babies is born with Down syndrome.

Too much of a good thing: Anywhere from 300 to 500 genes have altered levels and function, resulting 80 or 90 possible symptoms and an instantly recognizable phenotype (physical appearance). For example, patients have a 1 in 5 chance of developing a hole in the heart, compared to an incidence of 1:10,000 in the normal population. Down syndrome is extraordinarily complex, and my friend and colleague Roger Reeves has dedicated his career to helping patients with his research.

Cerebellar size: Dr. Reeves showed that the reduced size of the cerebellum in patients was due to defects in the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway. Using a drug that activated this pathway, he was able to restore the number of cerebellar cells to normalcy in a mouse model of Down syndrome, pointing to a therapeutic potential for the central nervous system deficits in patients.

Tweaking circuits: In the hippocampus—that part of the brain that’s used to navigate landmarks and fix memories, Down syndrome patients show an excess of inhibitory pathways compared to excitatory ones. A drug that is already FDA-approved works wonders on mice with the equivalent of Down syndrome, restoring balance to their brain. This drug is now in clinical trials for  Down syndrome patients.

It's not all bad: Research on Down syndrome has broad impact. For example, having three copies of a tumor suppressor gene means that patients have a 93% lower incidence of developing certain cancers. This insight could help treat cancers in the general population. Plus, as Roger likes to say, if you know anyone with Down syndrome, they tend to be pretty interesting individuals in their own right.

For more on Roger's research: http://goo.gl/uSJWm

#ScienceEveryday #DownSyndrome  
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People
Have him in circles
2,258 people
Work
Occupation
I do nerdy stuff.
Employment
  • University of Melbourne
    Research Assistant, 2012
  • Bio21 Institute
    Research Assistant, 2010
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Melbourne
Previously
Singapore
Story
Tagline
A science addict
Introduction
an average person hoping to achieve the extraordinary.
Education
  • University of Melbourne
    PhD, 2012 - present
  • University of Melbourne
    BSc (Hons). Biomedicine, 2011
  • University of Melbourne
    BSc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2008 - 2010
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Gender
Male