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worldbayonets.com - The Collector's Edge
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The best online bayonet reference site on the web!
The best online bayonet reference site on the web!

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I have been very busy and it has been very rainy in northern California, so I haven’t had an opportunity to photograph new bayonets, so thought I would share a scarce variation of a very common bayonet. Yugoslavian M1948 bayonets are very common today, having been surplussed in large numbers and widely exported to Europe and the USA for sale to collectors.

This example differs from the typical M1948 bayonet, in that it does not have the serial numbering on the crosspiece and frog stud. Instead, it has a very large serial number, in 0.375 in. (10 mm.) high numerals, on the pommel.

This example was a gift to me from Serbian collector, Nebojsa Milanovic. It also has the distinction of being pictured in Branko Bogdanovic’s newest book, Bayonets and Fighting Knives: Serbia, Montenegro and Yugoslavia, published late last year.

The Cyrillic marking (ПРЕДУЗЕЋЕ), was used until 1953, when they switched to the western marking (PREDUZECE). In English, it means "factory" or "enterprise." Factory 44 was the Zavodi Crvena Zastava (Red Flag Works) in Kragujevac, Serbia. The factory is still operating today and is known as Zastava Arms.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Yugoslavia/yugoslavia_2.html
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Added this sword bayonet for use with the 6.5 mm. M1894/14 Mauser Carbine to the Sweden Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide. This bayonet also mounts to the 9 mm. Carl Gustaf Submachine Gun m/1945C (Kulsprutepistol m/1945C).

The odd hilt design gives away that this is a bayonet designed for a rifle that wasn't originally designed to mount a bayonet. In 1914, M1894 Carbines were altered by the addition of a nose cap that incorporated a bayonet mount. The hilt incorporates a locking device to secure the bayonet to the scabbard.

This example is early production at Eskilstuna Jernmanufactur AB (Eskilstuna Iron Manufacturing, Inc.), as evidenced by the maker's trademark on the spine. Most were marked on the ricasso. It is not known when EJAB changed from marking the spine to marking the ricasso. Later examples produced by Carl Gustaf Stads were marked on the ricasso.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Sweden/sweden_2.html#swedish_m1914_bayonet
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Added this sword bayonet used with the 8 mm. M1886 Kropatshek rifle to the Portugal Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide..

This bayonet was designed for use with the M1885 Guedes single-shot rifle, of which 18,000 were in various stages of production at Steyr when Portugal decided to adopt the M1886 Kropatshek repeating rifle instead. Portugal paid for the Guedes', 8,000 of which were later completed by Steyr and sold to the Transvaal and the Orange Free State in So. Africa.

The M1886 rifle takes its name from Austrian Alfred Ritter von Kropatshek, who designed the rifle's tubular magazine system. Both the rifle and its yataghan sword bayonet were produced by Steyr in Austria. According to Steyr records, 56,000 M1886 Kropatshek rifles were made for Portugal 1886–89, with an additional 1,000 produced in 1893–94.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Portugal/Portugal2.html
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Added this knife bayonet for use with the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber G3 assault rifle to the Pakistan Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

1960s–1970s production examples have been encountered frequently for many years. More recently, newly-produced examples have been turning up with manufacture dates from 2005–2013. It is not clear whether these are military or made for commercial sale. This example is neither broad arrow proofed nor serial numbered as is commonly found on examples dating from the 1960s–1970s.

Construction is crude compared to the earlier production period. The crosspiece is a casting. The scabbard body is also a casting, with a longitudinal seam on front and back. Both the blade and scabbard are coated in a black finish that isn't phosphate, nor is it paint. The grip material is a rough, matte plastic, where earlier production grips were smoother and shiny.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Pakistan/pakistan_2.html
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Added this socket bayonet for use with the 16.9 mm. M1848 Tapriffel (Pillar Breech Rifle) and M1848–66 breech loading rifle (Snider Conversion) to the Denmark Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

Originally manufactured in Liege for Schelswig-Holstein rebels, these rifles were taken by the Danish Government and altered at Kronborg 1853–55 for use by Danish forces. They were subsequently converted to the Snider breech loading system at Copenhagen in 1866. Bayonets were made in both Denmark and Belgium.

The unit marking on the socket identifies the 20th Infantry battalion, 4th Company, Weapon No. 136.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Denmark/Denmark_2.html
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Wishing everybody a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from worldbayonets.com May you have good health, happiness, and great collecting in the coming year.
It has been a great collecting year, with more good finds this year than last. Had an article published earlier this year on the KCB-77 bayonet and its impact on the Eickhorn Brand. Also, have been assisting on another bayonet book project that should publish in the spring.
The worldbayonets.com site is in its 10th year. The site continues to grow and improve, recording its 3 millionth visit just a few weeks ago. The worldbayonets.com Facebook page is nearing 900 likes. A heartfelt Thank You to all who find worldbayonets.com useful and entertaining. Ralph Cobb
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With today’s post, worldbayonets.com added a new discovery to the Pakistan Page of the Bayonet Identification Guide, the first known 1950-dated Pakistani No. 9 Mk. I socket bayonet.

This example, made for use with the .303 caliber Lee-Enfield No. 4 rifle, was made in 1950 at Metal Industries Ltd. in Lahore, prior to establishment of the Pakistan Ordnance Factory in Wah Cantonment. M.I.L. had produced No. I Mk. II and Mk. III bayonets during the Second World War, when Lahore was still under Indian jurisdiction.

The blade profile is more rounded and the edge more crude than the British or P.O.F. No. 9 bayonets. The blade is both pinned and (rather sloppily) brazed to the socket. Prior to discovery of this example in 2016, all known M.I.L. examples were dated 1951. Discovery of this 1950-dated example demonstrates that the shipment of production equipment from R.O.F. Poole to Pakistan took place earlier than believed.

Only a small quantity of 1951-dated examples have surfaced, so production must have been low before manufacturing ceased and the factory was relocated to Wah, away from the border with India.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Pakistan/pakistan_2.html
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Added this Bayonet-Knife used with 5.56 mm. NATO caliber M16 and Galil assault rifles to the Israel Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

This bayonet was produced during the 1980s by A. Eickhorn-Solingen (AES), in West Germany, for Israel Military Industries (IMI).

It has the one-piece grip, pommel secured with a phillips-head screw, and plumb-colored blade characteristic of AES production. The scabbards is marked as being made in West Germany, similar to bayonets that AES produced for Haiti and other export contracts.

At first, the bayonet appears unmarked. However, the pommel is a casting and "IMI" is molded in to the casting at the end of the mortise.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Israel/israel_2.html
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Added this socket bayonet for use with the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber SA80 family of assault rifles to the Britain WWII & Post-War page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

The bayonet is a one-piece forging. The blade is offset to allow the hilt to encircle the rifle's muzzle. The hilt is painted black, while the blade is in the white. The blade has a serrated edge and wire-cutter feature.

The L2A1 scabbard has a plastic body that incorporates a wire-cutter, fold-out saw blade, and sharpening stone. The scabbard slips into a full-length belt frog and is secured to the frog by a Fastex connector.

The SA80 was adopted by the British Army in 1985 to replace the venerable L1A1 (FN–FAL). 350,000 were produced by the time production ceased in 1994. The SA80 rifles borrowed much of their mechanical design from the Armalite AR–18, which the Irish Republican Army had used very effectively against UK forces.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Britian__WW_II___Post-War_/britain_ww2_post_war_2.html#british_l3a1_sa80_bayonet
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Added this US M9 bayonet made by Tri-Technologies, Inc. of Mount Vernon, New York, to the USA Post-War Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

The company was founded in 1996 and manufactures small parts and components for military and commercial equipment. The existence of M9 bayonets produced by Tri-Technologies, Inc. was unknown until a few turned up in government surplus auctions in spring 2016. 40,000 are believed to have been manufactured from 2013-2015. 06MA8 is Tri-Technologies' Commercial and Government Entity Code (CAGE Code).

Adopted in 1986 as the Multipurpose Bayonet System M9, it remains the current-issue US Army bayonet. The M9 is a far more sophisticated bayonet design than the M7 it replaced. The M9's construction is massive in comparison to the lightweight M4–M7 series bayonets.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/United_States__Post-War_/us_post_war_2.html#m9_bayonet_tri_technologies
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