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worldbayonets.com - The Collector's Edge
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The best online bayonet reference site on the web!
The best online bayonet reference site on the web!

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Added this knife bayonet for use with the Madsen Lightweight Military Rifle to the Colombia page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

The Danish Madsen was the last newly-designed bolt-action infantry rifle. Obsolescent by the time it was brought to market in 1951, the rifle included a muzzle brake and rubber buttplate to manage recoil and a windage-adjustable aperture rear sight. It also included a sling patterned on the U.S. M1907 and this unique double-edged knife bayonet.

The only manufacturing contract was with Colombia in 1958 for production of approximately 6,500 rifles in .30-06 caliber. Reported serial numbers range from 0013 to 6493. The majority were placed in storage and surplussed without having ever been issued.

The bayonet is a simple design, with the hilt and sheet steel scabbard painted black and the blade left in the white.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/colombia/colombia.html
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Added this German Ersatz conversion of the T-back Belgian M1882 Garde Civique sword bayonet to the Germany—Ersatz Bayonets Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide. The late Anthony Carter classified this Ersatz type as EB 94 in his writings.

Alterations were extensive, including: removal of the muzzle ring, lengthening the mortise by 10 mm., grinding-flush the forward grip rivet, drilling the hilt to create a T-O slot for the Gewehr 98 cleaning rod, and relocating the press stud to the right side of the pommel.

The original Belgian markings are still present. The serial number with an X on the crosspiece indicates that the bayonet was formerly used by one of the Garde Civique units from the region around the city of Ghent. German markings observed on this example are “Deutsch” stamped on the upper tang and a proofmark on the pommel end.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Germany%20Ersatz/Germany_Ersatz.html#german_ersatz_bayonet_eb94
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Added this Argentine M1909 First Pattern bayonet to the Argentina Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

As designed, the M1909 bayonet differed from the M1891 in having the press stud relocated to the opposite side of the pommel, wood grips, a T-O hilt that encircled the rifle's cleaning rod, and a low Mauser 98-style muzzle ring.

When the first 3,000 rifles and bayonets arrived, a logistical problem became evident. While the low muzzle ring provided a stronger mounting, it meant that the new bayonet would not mount to the earlier M1891 rifle nor would the M1891 bayonet mount to the M1909 rifle.

To allow interchange of bayonets between the M1891 and M1909 rifles, the bayonet design was revised to incorporate the higher M1891 muzzle ring on the remaining bayonet production (all but the first 3,000) and the Ricchieri Adapter was developed for installation on M1909 rifles and carbines.

Reversion to the high M1891 muzzle ring also eliminated the need for a T-O slot and clean-out hole, which resulted in shortening of the hilt by 10 mm.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Argentina/Argentina2.html
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Added this rod bayonet for use with the 9 mm. Rexim-Favor MC Mk. 4 (Machine Carbine Mk. 4) submachine gun to the Switzerland Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

This bayonet and the Rexim-Favor MC Mk. 4's bayonet mount are both closely patterned after the German FG 42, where the bayonet is reversed in its mounting to stow beneath the barrel. Both the Favor and German FG 42 bayonet borrow much from the French M1936 bayonet.

The Favor submachine gun was a French design marketed by the Swiss firm, Rexim S.A. (Société Anonyme = Corporation). Rexim contracted with the Spanish Arms Factory of La Coruña (Fábrica de Armas de la Coruña) for manufacturing.

The Favor was an odd design, outdated before it was put into production. It was one of the few submachine guns to fire from a closed bolt, which further set it at odds with more contemporary designs. It is believed that approximately 5,000 were produced. The Favor was a modular design that could be configured with different stocks (or no stock, as a pistol), with different barrels, etc., so not all examples produced included a bayonet mount. The number of bayonets produced is unknown, but is likely to have been substantially fewer than 5,000.

Due to lack of sales, Rexim went bankrupt in 1957. Following Rexim's bankruptcy, the Arms Factory of La Coruña continued marketing the unsold guns. Only Turkey purchased in quantity, which they heavily modified, designating their variant M–68. Today, the Rexim-Favor is best known as the basis for one of the fictional laser weapons used in the 1977 Star Wars movie.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Switzerland/switzerland_2.html
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Added this Ersatz knife bayonet for use with the caliber .30–06 M1 Garand rifle to the Turkey Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

Crudely constructed of a pressed steel hilt mated with a recycled blade from an earlier Mauser bayonet. It is unclear whether the hilt is new-made or both the hilt and blade are from an earlier bayonet, with only the crosspiece being new.

The scabbard construction differs from the MKE scabbard shown in the prior post, being a more refined copy of the U.S. M8A1, with a belt hanger made of webbing. The sheet steel body is of substantially better construction than the MKE example above.

These bayonets first surfaced in 2017, about the time Turkey returned 13,000 M1 rifles to the U.S. Government.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Turkey/turkey_2.html
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Added this knife bayonet for use with the caliber .30–06 M1 Garand rifle to the Turkey Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

This bayonet and scabbard are crude copies of the U.S. M5 bayonet and M8A1 scabbard. They are entirely of Turkish manufacture. The bayonet's grips are made of cast aluminum, painted black. The scabbard body is made of sheet steel. The belt hanger on this example is made of canvas, folded and stitched.

These were made by M.K.E. in Ankara (Makina ve Kimya Endustrsi Kurumu, in English, Mechanical and Chemical Industry Corp.)

The USA reportedly provided 312,430 M1 rifles to Turkey, beginning in 1953 and ending with the final shipment of 5,000 in 1972.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Turkey/turkey_2.html
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Wishing everybody a Happy New Year from worldbayonets.com. May you have good health, happiness, and great collecting in the coming year.

It has been a great collecting year, with many good finds. It has also been a year of change for me, as I transitioned into retirement after almost 32 years in public service. This accounts for fewer posts in recent months, as I wrapped things up at work and made preparations at home for new adventures. Bayonet collecting and growing worldbayonets.com will continue to be an interest. I’m looking forward to being able to travel more and how that should enhance my collecting. I just had an article published on the undocumented early U.S. Fencing Bayonet in the worldbayonets.com collection.

The worldbayonets.com site is in its 11th year. The site continues to grow and improve, recording its 3.5 millionth visit just a few weeks ago. The worldbayonets.com Facebook page has over 1,000 followers. A heartfelt Thank You to all who find worldbayonets.com useful and entertaining. Ralph Cobb
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Added an interesting variant of the U.S. M7 Bayonet-Knife to the USA Post-War Era Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

This example is from contract DAAE2098P0241 At only 1,287 bayonets, it is believed to be the smallest US Government M7 bayonet contract.

In 1998, Lan-Cay International of Carrollton, Kentucky, was awarded a very small contract to produce the M7 bayonet, along with a larger contract they sought to produce additional M9 bayonets. Lan-Cay had no cost-effective way to tool up to produce such a small quantity of M7 bayonets, so subcontracted the job to the General Cutlery Corp., who had produced M7 bayonets during the late-1980s.

These were likely intended to be the last M7 bayonets procured by the government, since the M9 bayonet had been in production since 1986. However, the September 11, 2001, attacks caused the government to resume procurement of M7 bayonets in 2003.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/United_States__Post-War_/us_post_war_2.html
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Added this knife bayonet for use with the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber karabinek szturmowy wz. 1996 Beryl [assault carbine model 1996 Beryllium] to the Poland Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide.

This bayonet is believed to have been introduced c. 2010. Its construction differs from early 6H4 bayonets in a couple of respects: the upper tang does not extend through the cross guard, eliminating the flat steel pedestal behind the muzzle ring; and, there are no plugs or indentions on the sides of the grip. Small numbers have began making their way to the USA since 2016.

Adopted in 1997, following its invitation to join NATO (Poland was officially granted accession into NATO in 1999), the Beryl is a Polish 5.56mm assault rifle, designed and produced by the Łucznik Arms Factory in Radom. 80,000 are believed to have been produced. The rifle is to replace the 7.62×39mm AKM and 5.45×39mm Tantal used in the Polish Armed Forces.

The Tantal is a 5.45×39 mm. assault rifle designed and produced in Poland in the late 1980s. 25,000 were produced 1989–1994. The Tantal was withdrawn from service in 2005, with some retained in storage.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Poland/Poland_2.html
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Added this Italian M4 bayonet-knife for use on the caliber .30 U.S. Carbine M1 to the Italy Page of the worldbayonets.com Bayonet Identification Guide..

The USA provided 146,863 M1 Carbines to Italy between 1950 and 1963 under the Military Assistance Program. The M1 Carbine had a lengthy service life in Italy, well into the 1990s. Carbines remaining in Italian stores were returned to the USA in the mid-2000s and sold to collectors via the Civilian Marksmanship Program.

This example was made in 1958 at Arsenale Esercito Torino (Turin Army Arsenal). The grip scales are brown plastic. The scabbard is a U.S. M8A1 clone, with the body made of fiberglass with an olive green gel coat. The belt hanger is made of khaki tan cotton webbing.

Check out the pages on U.S. M4 thru M7 Series Bayonets & Foreign Copies for over 50 examples of these bayonets and related items.

http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/m4_thru_m7_series/m4_m7_series_p1.html
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