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Lightning can strike from the sky to the ground, but it can also jump from cloud to cloud or leap between regions of the same cloud that have different electrical charges. This latter type, called intra-cloud lightning, is actually the most common type of lightning. http://ow.ly/Lr02m
Lightning can strike from the sky to the ground, but it can also jump from cloud to cloud or leap between regions of the same cloud that have different electrical charges. This latter type, called intra-cloud lightning, is actually the most common type of lightning. Image Credit: iStock.com/neonjellyfish
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To keep blood pumping up its long neck, giraffes have a blood pressure up to five times’ that of humans. http://ow.ly/Li3SH
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As spaceflight goes commercial, companies are trying to figure out how to survive a spaceflight gone awry.
Falling from ten miles up, with no spacesuit on, in air that’s 70 degrees below zero and so thin you can hardly draw breath…Conditions were not ideal for Peter Siebold, a test pilot flying on Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShip Two, to survive. But he did. Siebold told investigators that he was thrown from... [read more]
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How do droughts like the ongoing one in California start? They don't happen overnight. We look at what's currently going on in the Golden State, then take a look back at some major droughts in recent history.
California’s drought has entered its fourth year, and for the first time ever, the state’s governor has imposed mandatory water restrictions to cope. The effects of the drought are near legion: Sour water in the Bay Area; moratoria on building new swimming pools; higher prices for fruit, vegetables, dairy and wine. So how did... [read more]
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Why NASA and the ESA think crashing a probe into an asteroid at 13,000 m.p.h. is an effective way to protect our planet (instead of sending Bruce Willis and Ben Affleck to get the deed done).
Scientists will crash a probe into an asteroid at more than 13,000 miles per hour.
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New research thinks there may be a reason why the hipster beard is so popular. Plus, more fascinating science stories in our weekly news roundup.
Seven days, lots of science in the news. Here’s our roundup of some of the week’s most notable and quotable items: Scientists in the U.K. are using tampons to measure local water quality. While the West is still working out some issues with medical consent, historians in Turkey have found a medical... [read more]
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Water erosion cuts arabesque-like steps from the rocks at Waiotapu, a geothermal hotspot in New Zealand. http://ow.ly/Ll0Ak
Water erosion cuts arabesque-like steps from the rocks at Waiotapu, a geothermal hotspot in New Zealand. Image Credit: Getty/Marco Simoni
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This canyon in Utah’s Zion National Park, called the Subway formation, was sculpted by the flow of a river over millions of years. http://ow.ly/Lf9au
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Might Band-Aids soon become a thing of the past? These medical sponges and glue may alter the way we take care of wounds.
A glue that seals sutures in 30 seconds. Instantly expanding sponges that pack bullet wounds. These are your new Band-Aids.<br /><br />
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Imagine what the Easter bunny would look like today if it had kept some of the characteristics of its ancestors from millions of years ago.
If Easter was celebrated 3 million years ago, the chocolate bunny in your basket would likely be six times larger, with stubby rat-like ears. Such was the body plan of Nuralagus rex, an ancient rabbit that roamed what is now the Spanish island of Minorca. N. rex wouldn’t seem very rabbit-like at... [read more]
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Why NASA and the ESA think crashing a probe into an asteroid at 13,000 m.p.h. is an effective way to protect our planet (instead of sending Bruce Willis and Ben Affleck to get the deed done).
Scientists will crash a probe into an asteroid at more than 13,000 miles per hour.
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Politics, disinformation, and corporate agendas: These are just some of the ways science can go from "good" to "bad."
Good science is a continual process, susceptible at many points to introduced errors and outright manipulation by the misguided and the devious. It’s critically important, as public faith in science continues to be tested, to take an honest look at some of the ways good science can be turned into... [read more]
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In their circles
22 people
Have them in circles
3,957 people
Santhosh Menon's profile photo
utissa lay's profile photo
Lucius M Nelligan Sorrentino's profile photo
MetaThis's profile photo
Dana Nourie's profile photo
Paul Haigh's profile photo
Daniel Nicolae's profile photo
Lumerical s.'s profile photo
Dilu Pillai's profile photo
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Introduction
The World Science Festival is a production of the Science Festival Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization headquartered in New York City. The Foundation’s mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future.