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Wolfgang Rupprecht
Works at WSRCC
Attended A small technical school in Cambridge, MA
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Test your server for the openssl heartbeat bug.   I tested one of my servers before and after the fixed version was installed from Fedora's koji build server.  It indeed tested vulnerable before the update and fixed after the update.   Anyone running an SSL server will want to hop on it and install the openssl fix ASAP.   Then crank out some new SSL certificates because the old ones are now questionable.
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Occam's razor has me favoring this theory.
 
MH370  A different point of view. Pulau Langkawi 13,000 runway.

A lot of speculation about MH370. Terrorism, hijack, meteors. I cannot believe the analysis on CNN - almost disturbing. I tend to look for a more simple explanation of this event.
 
Loaded 777 departs midnight from Kuala to Beijing. Hot night. Heavy aircraft.  About an hour out across the gulf towards Vietnam the plane goes dark meaning the transponder goes off and secondary radar tracking goes off. 
 
Two days later we hear of reports that Malaysian military radar (which is a primary radar meaning the plane is being tracked by reflection rather than by transponder interrogation response) has tracked the plane on a southwesterly course back across the Malay Peninsula into the straits of Malacca.
 
When I heard this I immediately brought up Google Earth and I searched for airports in proximity to the track towards southwest.
 
The left turn is the key here. This was a very experienced senior Captain with 18,000 hours. Maybe some of the younger pilots interviewed on CNN didn't pick up on this left turn. We old pilots were always drilled to always know the closest airport of safe harbor while in cruise. Airports behind us, airports abeam us and airports ahead of us. Always in our head. Always. Because if something happens you don't want to be thinking what are you going to do - you already know what you are going to do. Instinctively when I saw that left turn with a direct heading I knew he was heading for an airport. Actually he was taking a direct route to Palau Langkawi a 13,000 foot strip with an approach over water at night with no obstacles. He did not turn back to Kuala  Lampur because he knew he had 8,000 foot ridges to cross. He knew the terrain was friendlier towards Langkawi and also a shorter distance.
 
Take a look on Google Earth at this airport. This pilot did all the right things. He was confronted by some major event onboard that made him make that immediate turn back to the closest safe airport.
For me the loss of transponders and communications makes perfect sense if a fire. There was most likely a fire or electrical fire. In the case of fire the first response if to pull all the main busses and restore circuits one by one until you have isolated the bad one.


If they pulled the busses the plane indeed would go silent. It was probably a serious event and they simply were occupied with controlling the plane and trying to fight the fire. Aviate, Navigate and lastly communicate. There are two types of fires. Electrical might not be as fast and furious and there might or might not be incapacitating smoke. However there is the possibility given the timeline that perhaps there was an overheat on one of the front landing gear tires and it blew on takeoff and started slowly burning. Yes this happens with underinflated tires. Remember heavy plane, hot night, sea level, long run takeoff. There was a well known accident in Nigeria of a DC8 that had a landing gear fire on takeoff. A tire fire once going would produce horrific incapacitating smoke. Yes, pilots have access to oxygen masks but this is a no no with fire. Most have access to a smoke hood with a filter but this will only last for a few minutes depending on the smoke level. (I used to carry one of my own in a flight bag and I still carry one in my briefcase today when I fly).
 
What I think happened is that they were overcome by smoke and the plane just continued on  the heading probably on George (autopilot) until either fuel exhaustion or fire destroyed the control surfaces and it crashed. I said four days ago you will find it along that route - looking elsewhere was pointless.  
 
This pilot, as I say, was a hero struggling with an impossible situation trying to get that plane to Langkawi. No doubt in my mind. That's the reason for the turn and direct route. A hijack would not have made that deliberate left turn with a direct heading for Langkawi. It would probably have weaved around a bit until the hijackers decided on where they were taking it.
 
Surprisingly none of the reporters , officials, other pilots interviewed have looked at this from the pilot's viewpoint. If something went wrong where would he go? Thanks to Google earth I spotted Langkawi in about 30 seconds, zoomed in and saw how long the runway was and I just instinctively knew this pilot knew this airport. He had probably flown there many times. I guess we will eventually find out when you help me spread this theory on the net and some reporters finally take a look on Google earth and put 2 and 2 together. Also a look at the age and number of cycles on those nose tires might give us a good clue too.   
 
Fire in an aircraft demands one thing - you get the machine on the ground as soon as possible. There are two well remembered experiences in my memory. The AirCanada DC9 which landed I believe in Columbus Ohio in the eighties. That pilot delayed descent and bypassed several airports.   He didn't instinctively know the closest airports. He got it on the ground eventually but lost 30 odd souls.   In the 1998 crash of Swissair DC-10 off Nova Scotia was another example of heroic pilots. They were 15 minutes out of Halifax but the fire simply  overcame them and they had to ditch in the ocean. Just ran out of time. That fire incidentally started when the aircraft was about an hour out of Kennedy. Guess what the transponders and communications were shut off as they pulled the busses.
 

Get on Google Earth and type in Pulau Langkawi  and then look at it in relation to the radar track heading. 2+2=4  That for me is the  simple explanation why it turned and headed  in that direction.

Smart pilot. Just didn't have the time.

 


 
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I didn't realize that one can easily buy a TPM module to stick into the TPM header on modern motherboard.   While I'm not interested in secure boot or anything like that, I do need a real hardware random number generator.  Linux by default, at least on all the motherboards I own, is very slow to fill the entropy pool.   So slow that when I try to generate new dnssec keys for a dozen domains it take over 12 hours.   The entropy only fills at a reasonable rate when I'm actually typing at the keyboard.  (I assume that's why it never takes over 12 hours.  I'm never away from the keyboard for that long. ;-)

In any case and getting back to the initial point, this $10-$20 module has an Infineon TPM chip on it.  That chip includes a hardware random number generator that when plugged into the /dev/random machinery will allow one to suck 4.6 MBytes/sec of random numbers from /dev/random.    This is a vast improvement and lowers the time to generate a 2k dnssec key down to under 6 seconds.   That is a vast improvement.   This is well worth the 20 bucks I spent.

(BTW. I know nothing about the company at the end of the Amazon link I picked other than they have a picture of the module I bought.   It is darn hard to find pictures of this module that isn't from some storefront.)
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Take a look at http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/precise/en/man8/randomsound.8.html - it's for ubuntu but I'd guess there's an rpm available too if that's needed.
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i didn't realize how many cities had gigabit fiber available.   Over 2 dozen are listed in this article.
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I see big changes in store for server farms as they dump x86 for lower power ARM.  The big problem holding ARM back was its dinky address space.  That isn't going to be a problem with these arm-64 chips.  Let the games begin.
 
AMD's server oriented ARM chips announced

Overview
- 64-bit
- 8 Cores
- 128GB RAM support
- Offload engines (ie. encryption, compression, and integrated 10GbE)
- PCIe v3 (8 lanes)
- 25W TDP

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7724/it-begins-amd-announces-its-first-arm-based-server-soc-64bit8core-opteron-a1100
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XScale.
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I have to agree.   I no longer care either.  Android support is a mess.  Not even Google supports their Nexus line for very long.  Do they really expect everyone to buy new phones every year or two?   That's not going to happen here.   (In contrast, my 8 year old laptop still gets the most recent Fedora version updated twice a year.   Real open source projects try very hard to not abandon hardware that is only a few years old.)
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My Galaxy Nexus gets no updates anymore...
On the other hand, I love the screen on my Kindle HDX.
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See something never before filmed: a meteorite in "dark flight"
Skydivers with helmut cams were lucky enough not to be hit by this meteorite, but also to catch a video of it [04:24 for only 2 seconds].

As a meteorite crashes through the atmosphere, friction, pressure, and chemical interactions with atmospheric gases cause it to heat up and glow. Just before landing at less than a mile up (3600 to 4000 feet), the fire goes out and it's just a rock traveling at about 200 miles per hour.

This meteorite probably came from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. In geological terms, it is called a "breccia."

See also:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breccia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteorite
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Is this for real???
 
We're excited to start discussions with the South Bay to bring Google Fiber there. Share this graphic to let your neighbors know the news. Learn more and sign up for updates: http://goo.gl/AqL6me
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+Wolfgang Rupprecht I have no idea what a docsis 3.0 cable modem is. Although I think I can get cable with our cable tv provider. (We are in the shadow of Tocho, so its cable or satellite because no one does repeaters.) 

Before FTTH, I had ISDN 128k for a few years using a Yamaha RT105i (I think). Now with the FTTH, I use another Yamaha, the RTX1200.
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In Netflix's favor: binge watching and time shifting.   Original Netflix content not locked into fitting into the few evening timeslots or being metered out at one show per week and one season per year.
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In his circles
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898 people
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your typical compu-nerd, tinkerer and occasional homebrewer
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  • WSRCC
    software janitor, 1987 - present
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Original author of the floating point code in GNU Emacs. Original author of GPS differential corrections transmitted over the internet (DGPSIP). GPS and mapping software.
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Wolfgang Rupprecht's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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