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Wolfgang Rupprecht
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The heat death of the universe and the slow fadeout of G+: I wish google would enforce the real names policy again and prevent blue heads from posting. Anonymity encourages bad behavior.
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Once again we have a leap second and people are still screwing with discontinuous time on computers. It has been 4 decades since Unix stopped jumping time forward and backwards twice a year for daylight savings time. The internal time as seen by the kernel and apps is UTC (formerly GMT). The only thing that changes at the daylight savings time events is the display routines change the time offset from UTC/GMT. Sadly the same cannot be said for leap seconds. For some unfathomable reason the kernel's version of time is jumped by a second every time there is a leap second. That screws up any measurements that happen over that second and any smoothing operations that try to keep the computer's realtime clock running at precisely the right time end up taking a huge impuls. It often takes hours or days for the realtime clock tracking algorithms to stop ringing and calm down again. One thing that the US GPS system got 100% right was that it doesn't leap the internal time for leap seconds. The GPS downlink messages simply tell you the time and also the accumulated leap seconds as a separate number. That way things that rely on continuous time can simply watch the former and things that need to display wall-clock time to the humans can add the latter to the former and get the correct wall time. Russia's GPS system called GLONASS gets this point wrong. Whenever there is a leap second their system loses lock and it takes a long time for things to settle down again. Why can't our computers take a page from GPS's playbook and finally do the same and transmit continuous time with a current leap second offset.

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I recall that in grade school, lots of hyper-achievers blossomed in the 5th to 66th grade range. I wonder if this was related to discovering sex. In any case, I can't imagine that this effect (if true) is restricted to women.

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666 grams - the serving size of the beast.
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For folks that still are under their 10 articles per month NYT limit, this is important enough to blow an article cookie on. (For folks that are above the limit, clear your browser cookies and perhaps browser cache for anything in the NYT domain.)

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This is an introductory talk showing how Software Defined Radio can be used to find key-frob signals and how one can imitate those signals. Sadly the people making garage door or car door systems aren't all that clever about preventing even simple attacks.

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Basically there was a bug that only exhibited itself when changing modes, from one game to another and by changing the amount gambled. One feature of the bug was that it allowed you to replay winning hands. The two guys exploiting the bug got greedy and took way too much money home per day to stay under the radar.

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A little sister for for Feynman to play with. At 4 weeks, she is still too young to come home with us, but at Christmas when we are back north she will be ready.
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This looks to be a significant improvement in text messaging and voice phone call security. It also has an all-star cast of security people endorsing it. It is fully buzzword compliant with end-to-end encryption and a way to verify a remote user's key.

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"there is a shortfall of around 1.6 million cybersecurity professionals."

Really??? There are that many open purchase orders at developer pay rates to attract that much top talent?
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