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Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University
Cancer Treatment Center
Today 7:30 am – 5:00 pm
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Winship's Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Sagar Lonial presented findings today at the 2015 +American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting describing the results of a phase III study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on elotuzumab in treating myeloma patients. Learn more: https://winshipcancer.emory.edu/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/2015/landmark-multiple-myeloma-studies-from-winship.html #multiplemyeloma  
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Meet Winship radiation oncologist, Arif Ali, MD. An avid deep sea fisherman in his free time, Dr. Ali is also a flight surgeon in the Georgia Air National Guard and has recently served in Afghanistan and Syria. Learn more about Dr. Ali: http://radiationoncology.emory.edu/news/featured/meet-arif-ali.html #radiationtherapy  
When he's not treating patients at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Dr. Ali devotes his time to serving in the Georgia Air National Guard and deep sea fishing.
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The Winship #lungcancer  team works collaboratively to find new treatment options for patients at all stages.  Here Dr. Suresh Ramalingam previews their presentations at the upcoming ASCO 2015 Annual Meeting. Learn more: https://winshipcancer.emory.edu/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/2015/winship-presenters-at-ASCO15.html #ASCO15  
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More than 25,000 cancer professionals come together in Chicago this weekend for the annual meeting of the +American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Winship leaders will present their most promising new treatment approaches and here Winship executive director, Dr. Walter J. Curran, Jr., gives a preview of one important theme. Learn more: https://winshipcancer.emory.edu/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/2015/winship-presenters-at-ASCO15.html #ASCO15  
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Think you’re not at risk for melanoma? Winship #skincancer  expert Dr. Ragini Kudchadkar tells a different story in this +CNN AccentHealth video: https://player.vimeo.com/video/125924736
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Thanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, May 12th for the live online #pancreaticcancer  program chat with Winship docs, Bassel El-Rayes, MD and David Kooby, MD. If you missed it, you can read the highlights and transcripts at the link below.
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Have them in circles
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Winship's Chief Medical Officer and #multiplemyeloma  expert, Dr. Sagar Lonial describes results of a phase 2 trial of patients with refractory myeloma treated with daratumumab. Dr. Lonial will present the results at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting.

Learn more about clinical trials at Winship: https://winshipcancer.emory.edu/clinical-trials/index.html #ASCO15  
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The role of a #nursenavigator  is an important one in the proper care of patients affected by cancer. Check out this +CNN story featuring our own nurse navigator, Bonnie Josaphs and cancer survivor, Lex Gilbert: http://www.cnn.com/videos/tv/2015/04/07/patient-nurse-navigator.cnn

Learn more about our nurse navigators at https://winshipcancer.emory.edu/nurse-navigators.
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Being diagnosed with cancer can bring on many different types of emotions from fear to sadness to relief; even guilt. Here are some things to keep in mind if you think you might be suffering from survivor’s guilt. #cancersurvivor  
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Local film maker, Jonathan Hicks was treated at Winship for stage IV #lungcancer. He and his wife, Robyn, spoke today on 90.1 WABE about his cancer journey and the making of his film inspired by his diagnosis.
It was a classic love story. Jonathan Hicks and Robyn Young (now Hicks) met each other nine years ago in film school. Jonathan was pursuing filmmaking,
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Winship faculty and staff along with family and friends took part in the MMRF Team for Cures: Atlanta 5K this past weekend! Chaired by Winship's Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Sagar Lonial, the event raised awareness for multiple myeloma and raised funds in support of +Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation - MMRF. Our team raised $1,900. Great job and congrats everyone! #cancerawareness  
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What makes a medical hero? We see them every day at Winship Cancer Institute: patients who help others going through tough times, doctors who never give up seeking better care for their patients. We asked Winship #lymphoma survivor, Barbara McCullough and here's her response.
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1365 Clifton Rd Atlanta, GA 30322
1365 Clifton RoadUSGeorgiaAtlanta30322
Cancer Treatment Center, OncologistToday 7:30 am – 5:00 pm
Monday 7:30 am – 5:00 pmTuesday 7:30 am – 5:00 pmWednesday 7:30 am – 5:00 pmThursday 7:30 am – 5:00 pmFriday 7:30 am – 5:00 pmSaturday ClosedSunday Closed
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is Georgia’s only National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Center and serves as the coordinating center for cancer research and care throughout Emory University. Since 1937, Winship has served the citizens of Georgia and the Southeast by working tirelessly to prevent, treat and cure cancer.
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"Thank you Winship for your expert and loving care over the past 8 1/2 years."
"...like eager guests arriving at a Chemotherapy banquet."
"...followed at the Winship Cancer Center on the main Emory Campus."
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Have them in circles
58 people
prIME Oncology's profile photo
American Cancer Society Family of Journals's profile photo
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute's profile photo
Cancer.Net's profile photo
Testicular Cancer Society's profile photo
ShareWIK's profile photo
Breast Cancer News and Information Tracker's profile photo
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta's profile photo
ecancer's profile photo
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Nunya Bidnez
8 months ago
Sitting in the waiting room, one hour after our appointment, reminds me of a cattle car. They are too big for their own good. We are told, "We apologize for the delay," but nothing is done about it. We are often given conflicting directions. One thing they are very efficient at is billing. The bills come with breath-taking speed. Go somewhere where they care.
William Dozier
2 years ago
I was diagnosed with Stage 4 Base of Tongue Oral Cancer at Emory in 2006 by the ENT area and my cancer treatment followed at the Winship Cancer Center on the main Emory Campus. At the time of my diagnosis I was terrified and automatically took the diagnosis as a death sentence. I was informed that I had a 50 to 55% 5 year survival rate under the circumstances. I only asked that they tell me where to go, what to do and what time to be there and underwent full scale radiation treatment and chemo. That was now, 7 years ago and although I was left with some residual effects of radiation to the head/neck area, I cannot complain and feel as though I received near excellent handling throughout the entire almost 5 month journey.
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A Google User
3 years ago
Every time I go there is always someone to help because I have been four times and I still get lost.
A Google User
4 years ago
Jill Burrows
9 months ago
AS EMORY UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL TAKES ON THE TWO EBOLA PATIENTS (our hearts and prayers are with them), I'D LIKE TO SEND EMORY A SHOUT-OUT AND MY FOREVER THANKS FOR THEIR GROUND-BREAKING WORK AND EXTRAORDINARY PATIENT CARE. HERE ARE SOME OF MY NOTES WRITTEN DURING A VISIT WITH MY DAUGHTER GWYNETH AT THE INSTITUTE'S CANCER INFUSION CENTER: We have spent the last 2 days in the subterranean regions of Emory Hospital's Cancer Infusion Center -- the place where a few setbacks are patiently accepted in exchange for a few steps forward. We wait for reports, new orders from the lab, refreshed physician instructions, to have vital signs checked, and to greet what seems like an endless rotation of newly arriving patients who join our midst -- like eager guests arriving at a Chemotherapy banquet. The Infusion Center is a world onto itself with its own rules of engagement, and where hopes and fears, triumphs and setbacks, largely go unheralded in the world "out there." Brief, but memorable, interactions occur in the waiting room that yield valuable advice, knowledge of new therapies, names of favorite physicians, and heartfelt good wishes. Many of these patients are very open to telling you their stories of fear, hope and sometimes quiet heroism. Many of their stories are about personal triumphs that truly reside within the realm of miracles. We accept the love and encouragement from the caring nurses and support staff with a fierce gratefulness that sometimes defies reasonable hope. We eagerly accept with great fondness the attentions of these caregivers -- many of whom are, themselves, cancer survivors. They offer words of advice and encouragement that emanate from a very wise and visceral place, that are calibrated with almost scientific precision to relate to just what you are experiencing and what you need to know. These caregivers always seem to have the energy to go above and beyond the usual call of duty, as witnessed by everyday heroic deeds (quick clinical observations followed by life saving medical intervention); and personal sacrifice (coming in early and leaving late; half eaten sandwiches at lunchtime). Despite the obvious connections to other worlds and ways of being, this is a place where those of us who temporarily dwell here (either as patients or family members), experience, explore and extract from each moment an acknowledgement that there is a delicate and mysterious equilibrium that exists between life and death...and there are carefully calibrated codes of conduct that exist as a result of this reality. Kindness rules! I witness, with emotion, the warm hugs offered to Gwyneth from the many caregivers who have come to know and love her over the past eight years of her Cancer journey. Sometimes there are even a few hugs for me as Gwyneth's mom (it feels like celebratory status by association). I also greatly admire the family members who sit dutifully beside their kin or friend -- sometimes over many hours -- reminiscing about family lore, reading to them, offering jokes, running to the cafeteria for refreshments and talking about everything under the sun. They are here for the long haul; and they are an incredible inspiration to us who are, on one level, total strangers and yet who, from forced association, have instantly become family. We share something priceless and irreplaceable. Despite the fact we are in a place we would not have willingly chosen in a million years, we are here in full presence of mind and heart to give what we can to our loved ones. Sadly, Gwyneth lost her battle with cancer on March 9 of this year. Thank you Winship for your expert and loving care over the past 8 1/2 years. Jill Burrows of Cambridge, MA.
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A Google User
3 years ago
I went to emory to have a second opinion.I asked if I should come early they told me no so my appointment was 2oclock Owonokoko came and spoke with me at 4:15 and sent me for blood which they told me that would be another hour and half.I told them no thank you. Also when you go make sure that its the Dr. you want I went for my liver and told them who my doctor referred and they still gave me a lung and neck doctor who didn't really want to speak about my liver untill I just told him I have someone for them things. I feel they were unprofessional and unsympathetic to my needs. Thank you for your time and I hope this helps someone get better assistance than I did we as cancer patients go through enough as it is. As for Emory thank you but I will not be back.
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A Google User
3 years ago