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Willie Wong
Attended Princeton University
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Willie Wong

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1. Why would someone, whose name I have never heard of, working in a subject that is not remotely mathematics or physics, tag me as a coauthor on Academia.edu, of which I am not a member?

2. Why would, and how could, said person tag me using my gmail address (which is not public), rather than my much more public institutional addresses?

3. Why does Academia edu seem NOT to offer an easy way to correct the record?
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Laura Cerritelli (Lokie)'s profile photoAlice Leung's profile photo
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Weird! But at least most academics have public institutional addresses, so you could probably contact them directly if you needed to? Or, just exploit the bug by tagging a lot of random people until the site gets enough complaints they fix the bug.
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Willie Wong

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Digging through my office stuff in preparation for packing, and found a USB thumbdrive all of a whopping *64 MB*. Thirteen years ago when I got it as a freebie at a job fair (before the market crashed and job fairs had tons of freebies), that was an impressive amount of memory. I still remember my Laptop back then having an external floopy disk drive.
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Around the same time I also owned a digital camera that came with a 32MB SD card. It also runs on AA batteries. The memory card held about 50 photos when full (which was still more than a single roll of film), but the batteries usually ran out first if flash photos are involved.
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Willie Wong

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This has been passed around some bit; I am just being a small amplification factor.

(No need for concern for me, since my family is one of the lucky ones, even as I embark on my third international move in 6 years.)
This is the story of a friend of a friend, a man by name Francis who took his life at age 34. Francis had been struggling with manic depression through most of his years as a postdoc in theoretical physics. It is not a secret...
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Censorship: Subjective Measures 
From the article...
"In 2009, the subject of my student's complaint was my supposed ideology....That was, at best, a debatable assertion. And as I was allowed to rebut it, the complaint was dismissed with prejudice. I didn't hesitate to reuse that same video in later semesters, and the student's complaint had no impact on my performance evaluations.

In 2015, such a complaint would not be delivered in such a fashion. Instead of focusing on the rightness or wrongness (or even acceptability) of the materials we reviewed in class, the complaint would center solely on how my teaching affected the student's emotional state. As I cannot speak to the emotions of my students, I could not mount a defense about the acceptability of my instruction. And if I responded in any way other than apologizing and changing the materials we reviewed in class, professional consequences would likely follow.
..........
"This new understanding of social justice politics resembles what University of Pennsylvania political science professor Adolph Reed Jr. calls a politics of personal testimony, in which the feelings of individuals are the primary or even exclusive means through which social issues are understood and discussed."
...
"So it's not just that students refuse to countenance uncomfortable ideas — they refuse to engage them, period. Engagement is considered unnecessary, as the immediate, emotional reactions of students contain all the analysis and judgment that sensitive issues demand. "

---
via +Jim Philips 
How a simplistic, unworkable, and ultimately stifling conception of social justice took over the American college campus.
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Willie Wong

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From the writing perspective, the response is simply don't do that. If you rely on a result that is not published (and here I take it in the general sense where publication means "making publicly available") in making your argument, you should quote both the statement and its proof in the paper.

This is also what I would ask of the authors of the papers that I referee.

But I don't have an answer from the perspective of a reader, which seems to be the main scope of the MO question below.
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Willie Wong's profile photoDavid Jao's profile photo
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I am speaking from the perspective of the reader. I am not proposing any particular course of action for the author. That is a separate question. The author can't do any more than what you suggested. But from the perspective of the reader, this is still sometimes inadequate.
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Willie Wong

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Via +David Roberts ; the article is in French. Title translates to roughly "Testimony [I am still trying to find a better word] of a woman mathematician".
 
Témoignage d'une mathématicienne

par Michèle Vergne
 ·  Translate
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Willie Wong's profile photoDavid Roberts's profile photoYemon Choi's profile photo
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Having now had a chance to skim through the article, I think "testimony" may be the best word in this case...
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Someone is spamming MathOverflow with an advertisement to (translated from Chinese) "obtain transcripts and proof of enrollment and graduation" from various Western universities; the service I can only assume is fraudulent. What surprise me are:

1) The spammer leaves a QQ contact handle (I assume, maybe I am wrong), but doesn't this make them easily traceable (by the authorities)?

2) Why hasn't StackExchange's spam filter kicked in? There's gotta be 30 or 40 messages flagged already; couldn't they just do a /24 or /20 temporary IP block?
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John Baez's profile photoWillie Wong's profile photo
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1) is certainly off topic on Meta.MO.

2) is more-or-less just me griping. (It does appear that possibly MO is the first ones that the spammer hit: if I want to risk a network wide IP ban I would have tried something with larger traffic like StackOverflow instead. Many things about this spammers' approach seem non-ideal.) I used to be a moderator on Math.StackExchange and back then I would just go and ping one of StackExchange's engineers. I retired exactly so that such things are no longer my problem.
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Some of the stuff said is common sense, some is common knowledge, but some I wish had been hammered into me ten years ago (i.e. when I started Graduate School).

(To those reading from MSU: no, honest, I am not thinking about going on the market again. This is shared for the benefit of other people.)
Posts about Academic Job Search written by xykademiqz
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At first I thought this must have been an Onion-type satire. But WREG (the originator of this story) appears to be a real TV channel in Memphis.
 
What the everloving fuck.

You know who woulda broken a rule like that (the rule being to hold your applause until the end of graduation), thinking it harmless? My mom.

Jesus fucking christ. 

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/06/03/1390145/-Proud-black-families-arrested-for-cheering-at-a-high-school-graduation-in-Mississippi?detail=hide
Sigh. This really did happen . Have you ever been to a graduation ceremony where you were asked to hold your applause ...
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Willie Wong

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To those I know who are using SageMathCloud in their courses: do you know if SMC is FERPA compliant?
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Thanks!
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As an aside, adjectives and adverbs are inevitable in mathematics due to the jargon. You can't re-write "commutative Noetherian ring" or "maximal globally hyperbolic Cauchy development". I suspect things are not so different in many of the sciences, and I am not sure it was useful to examine that one particular stylistic advice.

And for technical fields, brevity and plain language may be contradictory. As evidenced by http://blog.xkcd.com/2015/05/13/new-book-thing-explainer/
 
"The researchers found that short and clear abstracts lead to a lower than expected citation count [...]"   (Except in mathematics and physics.)
A study suggests that short and clear abstracts are associated with lower than expected citations
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Mathematician
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Male
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6accdæ13eff7i319n4o4qrr4s9t12vx... at least, it pays the bills.
Introduction
Mostly I identify as a mathematician. My specialties are partial differential equations (especially nonlinear hyperbolic systems), geometric analysis, and mathematical physics (especially general relativity). You can find me somewhat active on MathOverflow.

I am an apprentice computer ninja. My computers usually run some flavour of Linux or Unix, I know my way around LaTeX quite well, and I am known to do a bit of scripting (I used to be a "clobber things together in bash" sort of guy, but now I prefer Python). I do the vast majority of my text editing in Vim, and prefer Mutt as my e-mail client.

I aspire to be a polyglot. Right now I speak English, French, and Chinese. I hope to add Japanese and Greek to that list.
Education
  • Princeton University
    Mathematics (PhD), 2005 - 2009
  • Princeton University
    Mathematics (AB), 2001 - 2005