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William Horka
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William Horka

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"A new imaging study shows that dogs’ brains respond to actual words, not just the tone in which they’re said...

the dogs processed the meaningful words in the left hemisphere of the brain, just as humans do... [and] processed intonation in the right hemisphere of their brains, also like humans. And when they heard words of praise delivered in a praising tone, yet another part of their brain lit up: the reward area. Meaning and tone enhanced each other. 'They integrate the two types of information to interpret what they heard, just as we do,' [lead researcher Attila] Andics says."
Scanners show that canine brains respond to words like humans
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William Horka

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Animal law takes hold at Harvard Law School.
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"Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have [designed] the first on-chip metamaterial with a refractive index of zero, meaning that the phase of light can travel infinitely fast."

"This uniform phase allows the light to be stretched or squished, twisted or turned, without losing energy. A zero-index material that fits on a chip could have exciting applications, especially in the world of quantum computing."
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A recent chimpanzee study observed play behavior in juveniles,  and identified different play and object manipulation behavior patterns in males versus females. "The sex bias for object manipulation the researchers found in juvenile chimpanzees is also found in human children" -- suggesting commonality with an earlier ancestor.
Research into differences between chimpanzees and bonobos in ‘preparation’ for tool use reveals intriguing sex bias in object manipulation in young chimpanzees – one that is partly mirrored in human children.
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Researchers found the birds can even remember an animal or person seen with a dead crow and were able to easily distinguish between people or hawks carrying dead crows and other birds.
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To all Python developers who interface with Amazon AWS, Rackspace, or Paypal (and others):

Did you suddenly start getting "[SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED]" ? The reason is here: https://github.com/certifi/python-certifi/issues/26

Short answer:
  export REQUESTS_CA_BUNDLE=`python -c 'import certifi; print(certifi.old_where())'`
  (You'll need to pip install "certifi" first perhaps)

Long answer:

  Remember how everybody agreed that 1024bit certificates are no longer secure? (Refresher: https://www.symantec.com/page.jsp?id=1024-bit-migration-faq ).

  Well, it turns out that some of the new 2048bit root CA certs were cross-signed with established 1024bit CA certs, which was a fine way to have them trusted before all the CA cert stores got updated. But now the 2048bit certs are in the trust stores, and the 1024bit certs are being ripped out. Which would be fine too, except if you have an OpenSSL < 1.0.2.

  Because OpenSSL < 1.0.2 will always try to validate an SSL cert chain up to the final cert in the chain; not stopping if it reaches a cert already in its trust store.

  You see the problem here. Those cross-signed certs are still technically valid -- any plenty secure at 2048bits -- but older OpenSSL (as on RHEL/CentOS 6 and Ubuntu 12 LTS) just can't handle their potentially-insecure issuer being removed from the trusted cert store.

  Arguably its a reasonable position to take, since the issuer is potentially untrustworthy, but the existence of the new CA cert in the trust store really ought to take precedence.

  OpenSSL >= 1.0.2 can be instructed to validate certs by the shortest trusted path. Python is patched to use this in 2.7.10/3.4.4, and python-requests will do it from 2.7.9 and 3.2.0 onward. But if you can't upgrade OpenSSL, the above workaround will suffice.

  Or you could pressure your vendor to replace their SSL certificate with one that terminates its chain in a 2048bit root CA cert... but good luck with that.

As explained by:
  https://github.com/kennethreitz/requests/issues/2455#issuecomment-76627411

Oh, and if you want a stable target to test against, see https://www.symantec.com/page.jsp?id=roots for a list of test sites using both VeriSign's 1024bit and 2048bit root CAs. Amazon's API endpoint are, FWIW, a moving target (some hosts behind their load balancers are apparently using the 2048bit root CA, some not).

Wow, I picked a great week to start using boto, huh?
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More great research into avian intelligence from Irene Pepperberg and team: pattern recognition of partially occluded figures and transference of object recognition from 3-space (real objects) to 2-space (drawings). An especially tricky task with the drawn figures partially composed of negative space.
Despite a visual system vastly different from that of humans, tests showed the bird could successfully identify both Kanizsa figures and occluded shapes. The findings suggest that birds may process visual information in a way that is similar to humans.
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Artist, animator and animal lover Lili Chin has created Cat Language, an adorable illustrated guide to what felines are saying with body language. This is a companion to her 2011 piece “Doggi…
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Are microservices right for you?
Microservices are awesome. We know this because of all the success stories that are circulating lately. The news is full of such stories, of people taking large, monolithic codebases, breaking them up, adding HTTP APIs and enjoying all the benefits. As with all fashionable practices, ...
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another good read: How not to do microservices: http://www.infoq.com/articles/seven-uservices-antipatterns
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The following is an article from The Annals of Improbable Research.by Marc Abrahams, Improbable Research staffDomestic cats roll. Oh, they roll and roll and roll—not constantly, but often enough that the behavior eventually caught the attention of scientists. In 1994, Hilary N. Feldman of Cambridge University’s Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour did a formal study of the phenomenon. Feldman’s monograph, called “Domestic Cats and Passive Submissio...
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+Philip Durbin your cat got upstaged there!
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Posted: Thursday, 24 September 2015. On 24 September 2015, ARIN issued the final IPv4 addresses in its free pool. ARIN will continue to process and approve requests for IPv4 address blocks. Those approved requests may be fulfilled via the Wait List for Unmet IPv4 Requests, or through the IPv4 ...
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After a jerk neighbor yelled at me for walking my cat down the sidewalk because his ill-behaved dog was going berzerk (all the while doing nothing to address the dog's behavior), I feel this deserves more positive press.
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