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Wil Hutton
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"It's a magical place." - Phillip J. Coulson"If you aren't scared of a croc bitin' you on the face, you ain't alive" - Butch
"It's a magical place." - Phillip J. Coulson"If you aren't scared of a croc bitin' you on the face, you ain't alive" - Butch

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Space.com
Space.com
space.com
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FAE hack for those of you concerned about “approach spamming”: treat the approach that someone used for their most recent action as an aspect that's currently in play — and compel it.

Prep for this by writing yourself a cheat sheet of 3 possible compels for each approach.
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My step daughter did this to a grocery list page.
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Look what's parked like a block from my house.
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And finally some notes on actions. Now I can finally start to iron out combat.

Actions are what characters take to accomplish things in the game. This can be hacking into a computer system, weaving a VTOL through a downtown's skyscrapers, or shooting someone before they can shoot you.

Before even picking up the dice and rolling, there are a few questions that have to be considered. It doesn't have to be long and involved, but it's important for setting expectations and outcomes.

• How and how? Every action has goal. This goal should be clearly stated in terms relating to the situation within the game. "I shoot out the light" is the how, and "To make it harder for security to see the rest of the team sneaking across the compound" is the goal. The goal will usually state what happens if the action succeeds ("make it harder for the security team to see". Any questions the players and GM have need to be ironed out beforehand - once the dice are rolled, that is what will happen.
• What are the consequences of failure? This is also decided between the players and GM before the dice are rolled. In the example above, the consequence might be that if the shot misses, the team either needs to find a different way into the compound or suck it up and run into the fully lit kill zone.
• What happens if this goes Sideways? All actions have a chance of going Sideways. When the situation goes Sideways, the results don't have to be directly related to the action's failure, but it should increase tension and the risk of subsequent actions. In the example above, the attempt to shoot out the light causes security to close the compound gates and sound the alarm, trapping the team inside.

Rolling the Dice
Basic resolution is simple: roll 1d10 and add the sum of the appropriate Ability and Skill. This is compared to the Risk Factor of the action. If the roll exceeds the Risk Factor, it succeeds.

Untrained rolls
If a character has a skill rank of 0 in a skill that is needed for an action check, and what they're trying to do isn't Unlocked (see Skills), they are considered untrained. In general, untrained characters roll 2d10 and take the lowest result. Extremely common actions that don't require a skill, or unlocked skills, roll 1d10 normally.

Going Sideways
If a 0 is rolled, the action has gone Sideways. The mechanical result is that the Risk Factor for a subsequent action is increased by 1. The action with the increased Risk should flow logically from the action that went Sideways. In the example of shooting out the lights, the effect of it going Sideways may increase the Risk Factor of one or more of the team getting hit by the security team's fire, or hiding from the security team searching for them.

Bonus Effect
If a 10 is rolled, the action generates a Bonus Effect. This has the result of giving the character an additional die on their next roll (so if they are simply Trained in a skill, they would roll 2d10 and take the highest). The same applies to Bonus Effects as Sideways results - they need to flow out of the game situation. In the shooting out the light example, the Bonus Effect may be a power surge that throws a breaker and temporarily shuts down all of the power, distracting the guards and making it easier to sneak past them - or making it easier to bypass the security systems once inside.

Going For Broke
Sometimes a character just needs to go all in for an action with the hope that the outcome will make things easier in the long run. When a character Goes For Broke, they intentionally raise the Risk Factor of the action by 1 in order to gain a die on a connected or subsequent action

When Going For Broke, if the character gets a Bonus Effect the player to choose to either take 2 extra dice on the next action, or gain a die on two related actions. On the other hand, if the roll goes Sideways it can be catastrophic - it always increases the Risk Factor of the subsequent connected action by 2.
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So one of our teams has a row in a database that they want a particular column to be basically readonly. Not the column in the table; the column for a specific row. Because I guess they're having issues with some users updating the value for that row and breaking things. So they asked us if there was any way to do this on the database side.

I think I need a drink now.
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