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Wes Winham
Works at PolicyStat
Attended Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Lives in indianapolis, indiana
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Wes Winham

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I recommend The Mellow Heuristic:
---
The Mellow Heuristic is a rule of thumb for adjudicating intellectual disputes when directly relevant information is scarce.  The rule has two steps.  

Step 1: Look at how emotional each side is.  

Step 2: Assume the less emotional side is right and the more emotional side is wrong.
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Wes Winham

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A test-coverage parable:
---
Early one morning, a programmer asked the great master:

“I am ready to write some unit tests. What code coverage should I aim for?”
The great master replied:

“Don’t worry about coverage, just write some good tests.”
The programmer smiled, bowed, and left.

...

Later that day, a second programmer asked the same question.

The great master pointed at a pot of boiling water and said:

“How many grains of rice should put in that pot?”
The programmer, looking puzzled, replied:

“How can I possibly tell you? It depends on how many people you need to feed, how hungry they are, what other food you are serving, how much rice you have available, and so on.”
“Exactly,” said the great master.

The second programmer smiled, bowed, and left.

...

Toward the end of the day, a third programmer came and asked the same question about code coverage.

“Eighty percent and no less!” Replied the master in a stern voice, pounding his fist on the table.
The third programmer smiled, bowed, and left.

...

After this last reply, a young apprentice approached the great master:

“Great master, today I overheard you answer the same question about code coverage with three different answers. Why?”
The great master stood up from his chair:

“Come get some fresh tea with me and let’s talk about it.”
After they filled their cups with smoking hot green tea, the great master began to answer:

“The first programmer is new and just getting started with testing. Right now he has a lot of code and no tests. He has a long way to go; focusing on code coverage at this time would be depressing and quite useless. He’s better off just getting used to writing and running some tests. He can worry about coverage later.”

“The second programmer, on the other hand, is quite experience both at programming and testing. When I replied by asking her how many grains of rice I should put in a pot, I helped her realize that the amount of testing necessary depends on a number of factors, and she knows those factors better than I do – it’s her code after all. There is no single, simple, answer, and she’s smart enough to handle the truth and work with that.”

“I see,” said the young apprentice, “but if there is no single simple answer, then why did you answer the third programmer ‘Eighty percent and no less’?”

The great master laughed so hard and loud that his belly, evidence that he drank more than just green tea, flopped up and down.

“The third programmer wants only simple answers – even when there are no simple answers … and then does not follow them anyway.”
The young apprentice and the grizzled great master finished drinking their tea in contemplative silence.
---
“How can I possibly tell you? It depends on how many people you need to feed, how hungry they are, what other food you are serving, how much rice you have available, and so on.” “Exactly,” said the great master. The second programmer smiled, bowed, and left. ... Toward the end of the day, ...
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How not to provide customer support: Priceline.com
 
In which +Priceline.com refuses to stop sending me another customer's personal information. Stay classy, Priceline.
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"PEP8 unto thyself, not unto others." - Raymond Hettinger #pycon 
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Facebook is releasing some excellent tools! I'm especially excited about Relay and GraphQL. The first big problems I always run into when using REST in an "eat your own API" world are:

A. Staying DRY[1] in declaring what data the client needs.
B. Solving N+1 query[2] problems.

Relay + GraphQL are the best patterns I've seen to solve this. GraphQL actually reminds of the Jenkins API's [3] data selection ability. Here's hoping something like django-rest-framework can bolt that on.

[1]: Barring a crazy amount of Selenium testing (which has it's own costs), it's very difficult to avoid pushing too much data as you iterate both the front-end and back-end. Things quickly approach the "I'm afraid to touch this" territory that gradually and predictably slows down development. 
[2]: Making 30 internal API requests for 30 objects sucks. Don't even get me started on following relationships!
[3]: https://wiki.jenkins-ci.org/display/JENKINS/Remote+access+API
A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
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Wes Winham

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I've lived in Indiana for a dozen years now. The good news, here, is that the outcry against the RFRA is much, much louder than the support, especially in Indianapolis. It's also good that Indiana has taken such a beating over this in national press. Hopefully it will dissuade other states from passing similarly-targeted legislation (I'm looking at you, Oklahoma).

Attempting to hide their true motivations just isn't working and that's a good thing.

It does suck that my company might actually lose customers over this, though.

In our current, far-from-first-best world, passing legislation that's clearly carved out to support one specific dimension of bigotry is morally repugnant. I'm not interested in deploying an intellectual cover for people who have decided to suddenly care about a very specific, very bigoted expression of the right to free association. They can't have it both ways.

---
Political philosophy digression. You've been warned:

From a freedom/efficiency perspective, this issue is complicated. The first-best solution would certainly not distinguish between "religious" choices and non-religious choices. In a first-best situation, I would also support the rights of private businesses[1] to discriminate against folks for whatever stupid reasons they want. I would then experience great schadenfreude as those stupid businesses were punished for that decision by the increased ability to share information. I would also be happy to let bigots self-identify so that I could avoid patronizing them. In a first-best world, I'd love to be able to see a little rainbow flag with a cross through it next to an Amazon.com vendor's goods, so that I can avoid them. As basically the pinnacle of privilege, I have no way of discovering that for myself.

[1]: Most (all?) of the "businesses" in the worst-case service refusals scenarios are not private. Healthcare providers that accept medicaid/medicare, for example.
Since the passage of a "religious freedom" law, Indiana has begun to feel the heat.
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Wes Winham

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A short story involving DMT, Universal Love and Consequentialism. What's not to like?
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More evidence of the freaky impact of your gut on complicated brain things: Probiotics made folks more resilient against sadness.
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I wish I had done this first. Brilliant!
 
Trolling Win
H/T +Jordan Peacock 
#DbnDb  
Man is a thirsty beast, and nowhere is that thirst more acutely exemplified than on Tinder, the matchmaking app that lets users swipe right in their quest to find love, lust, bots, or viral...
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They wrote a research paper on the math behind their dick joke. This makes me love them so much more. 
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Favorite part. I mean right behind the "you brought piss to a shit fight" scene. 
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I find this hypothesis for explaining growth in wage-based income inequality very compelling. Essentially:

* Residential rent is higher
* Firm value is now mostly "intangible"
* Firms are larger
When I moved to Boston in 1982, no one talked about the declining share of national income going to labor. Or increasing income inequality. Now these are the hottest topics in economics. Much of the discussion seems to implicitly suggest...
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Hmmm, havent yet had time to thoroughly read that, but the basic idea seems to make sense. I could posit a few corrollaries, but I'll hold off unti l I have time for a more thorough analysis. Lots of big meetings today...
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I cannot stress this enough.

"To an increasing degree, we're counting on having angels in office and making ourselves vulnerable to devils. Bush and Obama have built infrastructure any devil would lust after. Behold the items on an aspiring tyrant's checklist that they've provided their successors:

* A precedent that allows the president to kill citizens in secret without prior judicial or legislative review
* The power to detain prisoners indefinitely without charges or trial
* Ongoing warrantless surveillance on millions of Americans accused of no wrongdoing, converted into a permanent database so that data of innocents spied upon in 2007 can be accessed in 2027
*Using ethnic profiling to choose the targets of secret spying, as the NYPD did with John Brennan's blessing
* Normalizing situations in which the law itself is secret -- and whatever mischief is hiding in those secret interpretations
* The permissibility of droning to death people whose identities are not even known to those doing the killing
* The ability to collect DNA swabs of people who have been arrested even if they haven't been convicted of anything
* A torture program that could be restarted with an executive order

Even if you think Bush and Obama exercised those extraordinary powers responsibly, what makes you think every president would? How can anyone fail to see the huge potential for abuses?

I am not saying no one would resist a tyrant. Perhaps Congress would assert itself. Perhaps the people would rise up. Then again, perhaps it would be too late by the time the abuses were evident. (America has had horrific abuses of power in the past under weaker executives who were less empowered by technology; and numerous other countries haven't recognized tyrants until it was too late.) Part of the problem is how much the Bush-Obama paradigm permits the executive to do in secret. Take that paradigm, add another successful 9/11-style attack, even after many years of very little terrorism, and who knows what would happen?

No one does."
More and more, we're counting on having angels in office and making ourselves vulnerable to devils.
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Have him in circles
527 people
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  • PolicyStat
    VP of Product, present
    I'm responsible for ensuring that we're building awesome things for our customers, that we're building them for the right customers, that we're awesome at building those things, that our time spent building those things is fulfilling and that we're continuously increasing our average level of awesome.
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indianapolis, indiana
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spencer, oklahoma - chickasha, oklahoma - terre haute, indiana - bloomington, indiana
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Software entrepreneur in Indianapolis who likes nerding, ultimate, beerpong and economics
Education
  • Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
    Software Engineering
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Wes Winham's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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Front desk staff was very friendly and helpful. We were buying bandaids in the convenience store and they offered to give us some for free instead. A small thing, but generally indicative of their helpfulness. I also definitely recommend a room with access to the concierge suite if you're going to be there during the week. Solid breakfast in the morning and desserts plus drinks in the evening.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Great food with good prices and quick, friendly service. Right off the highway (google maps was wrong). Went there for breakfast with group of five. Seated right away and served quickly. Standard breakfast menu fare with some twila's-themed special items. Food arrived very quickly and was universally good. We had twila's omelette (great usage of sweet peppers), french toast, cinimon toast, hash browns (crispy and very good), scrambled eggs. bacon (crispy, good), and toast. All food was good, service was great, prices were great. Plan on stopping here again.
• • •
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago
3 reviews
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Service was friendly, but incredibly slow. Went for lunch with a group of 5 at 11 with 3 other tables in the place. Hamburger and tuna melt took 15 minutes with a turkey sandwich and philly cheese steak taking 20 after that (first two were basically finished). Waited 15 after that and they forgot about the omelette (with 15 customers in the whole place). Home fries were bland. Philly cheese steak was ok. Tuna melt was good. Burger wasn't quite as good as wendys. omelette was good. Prices were high for the quality ($6 for turkey lunch meat sandwich with no cheese) Keep driving if you're on the highway, otherwise bring a book and get the tuna melt.
• • •
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago