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Wayne Radinsky
Attended University Of Colorado At Boulder
Lives in Denver
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Wayne Radinsky

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Terminator style liquid metal has been devised -- for an antenna. Or maybe what was devised was a new electrochemical method for reversible, pump-free control of liquid eutectic gallium and indium (EGaIn) in a capillary. "The simplicity of applying a small positive voltage to cause the metal to flow into a capillary, and a small negative voltage to make it withdraw again, obviously takes place on a much smaller scale than the mimetic poly-alloy which makes up the Terminator." You don't say.

"Our antenna prototype using liquid metal can tune over a range of at least two times greater than systems using electronic switches."
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Vapor-phase heat pipes are amazing, but liquid metal heat pipes are just awesome, especially if they don't need pumps.  A lot of performance cars have sodium-filled exhaust valves to help extract heat.
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You'll be sorry when the robot journalists take over, says Jennifer O'Connell. "Algorithms may be good at crunching numbers and putting them in some kind of context, but journalists are good at noticing things no one else has. They're good at asking annoying questions. They're nosy and persistent and willing to challenge authority to dig out a story. They're good at provoking irritation, devastation, laughter or controversy."

Well, somebody better get working on the "nosy and persistent" algorithms.
This year, computer software will produce more than a billion stories on the web. The majority will never be read, but in this era of McJournalism does anyone care?
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Fair enough.
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Disney worked with NASA to make the film Tomorrowland -- but not for the jet packs. It was to develop the Casey character, who is a young girl who understands science and math and loves space exploration.
Disney’s movie Tomorrowland opens this weekend and will very likely top the box office for the Memorial Day holiday weekend. The movie is visually stunning and illustrates an ambitious future of what the future might possibly look like. The premise of the story centers around a curious and brilliantly smart girl [...]
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The movie flopped, I read. Box office numbers were disappointing. I'll be watching it nevertheless, despite this awful Clooney person.
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L'Oréal plans to start 3D-printing human skin. "Since it nixed animal testing in 2003, the French cosmetic firm has relied on models of "reconstructed human epidermis" -- essentially skin samples grown from post-surgical donor tissues -- to evaluate the safety and efficacy of its products. Although L'Oréal's dedicated lab facilities in Lyon grow roughly 54 square feet -- or about a full cow's worth -- of skin a year, the company wants to speed up and even automate the process. That's where Organovo comes in. The San Diego -- based startup made headlines in 2014 for creating the world's first functional liver using three-dimensional printing."
Photo by Shutterstock L'Oreal knows that the business of beauty is as much a science as it is an art. Since it nixed animal testing in 2003, the French cosmetic firm has relied on models of "reconstructed human epidermis"—essentially skin samples grown from post-surgical donor tissues—to eva ...
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Making hardware is a total pain, but not in this factory. "Just getting quotes from different manufacturers would take weeks. Some shops wouldn't respond to a request for a quote at all. Others would provide wildly different quotes, making it hard to know what was driving the costs of a certain project. And once it was time to actually manufacture the prototypes, he would be left in the dark throughout the process, unless something went wrong."

"What Church really wanted was for manufacturing to work more like cloud computing, where you can simply request the resources you need through the web. He wanted to be able to upload his designs to a manufacturer, get a quote automatically, and, when the time comes, order a batch of prototypes with a push of a button."
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A vision algorithm has been taught to recognize beauty and then allowed to trawl through the long tail of Flickr images with five favorites or less looking for gems that nobody has noticed.

They started by crowdsourcing opinions from actual humans on the aesthetic quality of 10,000 photos from Flickr, categorized as people, nature, animals, or urban. They used this to train a machine learning algorithm, then they let "CrowdBeauty" loose on 9 million images from Flickr that have fewer than five favorites. "The results are impressive with CrowdBeauty highlighting numerous beautiful pictures."
Beautiful images are not always popular ones, which is where the CrowdBeauty algorithm can help, say computer scientists.
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Head and tail are also words that are applied to sorted lists. Here they mean one picture at the unpopular (tail) end, and one picture at the top Flickr Interestingness end (head)
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Oculus just bought Surreal Vision, a startup dedicated to 3D scene reconstructions algorithms that can "pull the real world into VR."

"These technologies will lead to VR and AR systems that can be used in any condition, day or night, indoors or outdoors. They will open the door to true telepresence, where people can visit anyone, anywhere."
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China can become one of the strongest industrial robot makers by 2030, says Song Xiaodong, the secretary-general of the China Robot Industry Alliance.

"The country has all the makings of a robotics leader given its major manufacturing bases and strong demand for such technology. Local robot makers are also backed by national policy and huge market potential." "Since 2005, over 700 companies have entered the Chinese robotics industry."
Trade delegates are shooting for the stars to make China one of the leading robotics manufacturers by 2030.
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The "Living Heart Project is a highly realistic digital model of the human heart "Doctors wear 3D glasses and use a joystick to zoom in to a ventricle or valve, while listening to every heartbeat."

"We take a [patient's] scan, reconstruct it into a 3D model, and test all the possibilities before a heart surgery,"
The Living Heart Project aims to create a detailed simulation of the human heart that doctors and engineers can use to test experimental treatments and interventions.
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The rise of military robot R&D: a global phenomenon. Russia has been ramping up tests of Uran battle robots, and a state-owned company, Rostec, is developing a tracked robot platform capable of conducting military strikes, clearing mines, and venturing into areas impacted by radiation. China's Zhuhai arms show was a humanoid extravaganza that featured the 'Sharp Claw,' a two-ton robotic scout with a built-in quadcopter and all-terrain driving capabilities.

"As many as 87 countries have tested robots that could eventually be used on the battlefield, and 40 nations are actively doing so."
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Hey #Robots against #Robots The absurdity of #War in a civilization that now has #Positive resources Enough for every human to live a decent life!

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The quest for an algorithm that could tell you when to develop a new business model or whether to enter a new market. "Something almost as interesting is emerging: a way for organizations to apply algorithmic principles to make frequent, calibrated adjustments to their business models, resource allocation processes, and structures -- without direction from the top."

"At each juncture in its evolution, Alibaba continued to generate new business model options, letting them run as separate units. After testing them, it would scale up the most promising ones and close down or reabsorb those that were less promising. In 2006, for example, spotting two new trends, Alibaba decided to launch two units. To tap the growing B2C market, it began building Taobao Mall, a platform for established brands to reach Chinese consumers, which eventually became Tmall and is a major part of the group portfolio today. To catch the software-as-a-service wave, it started Alisoft, which probably entered the market too early. Alisoft could not find a killer app that generated enough customers. The business was shut down in 2009. Another driver of Alibaba's success has been the ability to modulate its rate of business model experimentation to fit the circumstances."
How Alibaba uses algorithmic thinking to constantly reinvent itself
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Just in time for class today. Thanks +Wayne Radinsky!
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So, I was reading about why we have 60 minutes in an hour and 60 seconds in a minute. It's because of the Babylonians, who were fascinated by the number 60 because it has more factors than any smaller number. And, when you think about it, 60 is rather nifty because you can divide it up in all the ways humans like to divide things up. You can divide it in half (half an hour is 30 minutes), in thirds (20 minutes), in quarters (15 minutes), in 5ths (12 minutes), in 6ths (10 minutes), and in 10ths (6 minutes). What other ways do humans like to divide up an hour? Hard to think of any.

So I decided to explore this idea of "numbers that have more factors than any smaller number". So I wrote a computer program that calculates the number of factors for every number, and outputs numbers that have more factors than any number that comes before it. The number 60 has 12 factors, which, if you want to count them to verify I'm not making this up, are: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 12, 15, 20, 30, and 60. This is more than any number before it; for example 59 has 2 factors (it's prime), 58 has 4 factors (1, 2, 29, and 58), 57 has 4 factors (1, 3, 19, and 57), and so on.

I decided to call these numbers "Babylonian special numbers" so as not to confuse them with regular special numbers in mathematics. Actually I've never heard of "special numbers" in mathematics, but I figured somebody at sometime in history must've dubbed something "special numbers."

Anyway, I discovered these "Babylonian special numbers" are pretty sparse. There are 4 1-digit Babylonian special numbers, 5 2-digit numbers, and 6 3-digit numbers. (See table below.) Curious, I decided to continue. I found there were 5 4-digit numbers, 9 5-digit numbers, 9 6-digit numbers, and 9 7-digit numbers. So they're pretty few and far between, as numbers go.

I noticed that while we use 12 and 24 (which are also Babylonian special numbers) for our 12- and 24-hour clocks (which is also due to the Babylonians), we skip over 36 and 48 before getting to 60. I figured this was because 36 and 48 don't have 5 as a factor. We humans like to be able to divide by 5s and 10s. So it's no wonder the Babylonians liked the number 60 -- it's the smallest number that divides everything humans like, including 5s and 10s, and is the only 2-digit number to do so (there are no more Babylonian special numbers between 60 and 100 -- the next is 120).

So I decided to also note on the table when a new prime number is introduced as a factor. I decided to call these "Babylonian extra special numbers."

Here's the table. Note that 360, the number of degrees on a compass, also appears on the list.

1: number of factors: 1
2: number of factors: 2, first appearance of 2 as a factor (extra special)
4: number of factors: 3
6: number of factors: 4, first appearance of 3 as a factor (extra special)
12: number of factors: 6
24: number of factors: 8
36: number of factors: 9
48: number of factors: 10
60: number of factors: 12, first appearance of 5 as a factor (extra special)
120: number of factors: 16
180: number of factors: 18
240: number of factors: 20
360: number of factors: 24
720: number of factors: 30
840: number of factors: 32, first appearance of 7 as a factor (extra special)
1260: number of factors: 36
1680: number of factors: 40
2520: number of factors: 48
5040: number of factors: 60
7560: number of factors: 64
10080: number of factors: 72
15120: number of factors: 80
20160: number of factors: 84
25200: number of factors: 90
27720: number of factors: 96, first appearance of 11 as a factor (extra special)
45360: number of factors: 100
50400: number of factors: 108
55440: number of factors: 120
83160: number of factors: 128
110880: number of factors: 144
166320: number of factors: 160
221760: number of factors: 168
277200: number of factors: 180
332640: number of factors: 192
498960: number of factors: 200
554400: number of factors: 216
665280: number of factors: 224
720720: number of factors: 240, first appearance of 13 as a factor (extra special)
1081080: number of factors: 256
1441440: number of factors: 288
2162160: number of factors: 320
2882880: number of factors: 336
3603600: number of factors: 360
4324320: number of factors: 384
6486480: number of factors: 400
7207200: number of factors: 432
8648640: number of factors: 448
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(We should get rid of Daylight Saving Time, though -- that's ridiculous.)
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Software Design Engineer
Introduction
I'm a software engineer specializing in great design of software -- every successful large software project ever made started out as a small software project that got larger. The key to a successful large project is knowing how to design software when it is small so it is capable of growing. Poor design in the early stages leads to high-entropy software that is difficult to maintain and add new features to years down the line. Good design in the initial stages allows new software features to be added easily. Good design doesn't take any more time than poor design, but you have to know how to do it.

Certain keys are very essential to good design. The beginning is the program's data structures, which form the foundation for any software project. The key to good data structure design is to make sure that the relationships between bits of data in your data structures are the same as the relationships between the objects or ideas that those data structures represent in the minds of your users. Any time these get out of sync, you are in for trouble -- but the trouble does not usually arrive immediately -- it can arrive months or years down the line. This delayed feedback cycle is one reason many software projects run late or fail. Any time the data structures are out of sync with the minds of users, there is the temptation to "patch" the problem by adding more data structures, that form a bridge between the existing data structures, and what you want to do. These "patches" are, unfortunately, "dirty hacks", that down the road will add complexity to your software. It is this complexity -- and more to the point, *unnecessary* complexity, that makes it more difficult to maintain or extend your software with new features in the future.

It is also extremely important to design the code structure correctly. It is very common to make basic errors like using global variables. Globals are very powerful, but should be used with care -- they connect separate components of the software with each other. (And be aware that many variables are global even when they are not called "global" in your particular programming language -- they can have other names). When you *want* something to apply "everywhere", globals are the right choice, because you change them in one place and the change is applied everywhere. But more often than not, globals are used when they shouldn't be, causing a change in one part of a program to cause another part of the program, that seems unrelated, to break.

Another minefield is object oriented programming. Objects are an extremely powerful and flexible programming metaphor -- and that's the problem. They are so flexible that they can mean almost anything, and they can make it easy for you to shoot yourself in the foot with excessive complexity. In reality, there is nothing wrong with non-object-oriented programming -- proper and thoughtful use of functions and libraries of functions -- so it is not necessary to use objects everywhere or make "everything" an object in your program. In particular, there is no advantage in doing "object-relational mapping" -- if you're doing this, it means you have designed all your data structures *twice* (once in the relational data model, and again in an object-oriented model), wasting effort. Furthermore, objects should only be used when they add *clarity* to a program, when they make it easier to understand how the program works, rather than more difficult. In certain situations, such as when polymorphism is needed to solve whatever problem your software needs to solve for the user, objects are a clear benefit, simplifying the design and adding clarity to the code. In many other situations, however, excess use of objects creates obfuscation, leading to maintainability problems and difficulty adding features to your software in the future.

And it is these complexity issues that impose limitations on how big your software can get, how many features it can have, and ultimately how well your business can grow and how well you can serve your customers.
Education
  • University Of Colorado At Boulder
    Computer Science
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