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Wayne Radinsky
Attended University Of Colorado At Boulder
Lives in Denver
14,350 followers|6,079,329 views
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Wayne Radinsky

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FenOS is an operating system that claims to be able to run, natively (without any thunk layers or virtualization systems), any software written for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, Linux/Unix and Solaris. Looks like a commercial (closed-source) project which will go on sale later this year. Will be interesting to see if this actually works.
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Yeah... Can be interesting, but I want to see it work and the performance of it. Would be surprising if it goes half as fast as Windows8.
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Cloned embryos have been created from skin cells from a 35-year-old and a 75-year-old and the cloned embryos were used to create tissues including heart cells.
Another step toward having your own reserve of spare stem cells on demand
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Scientists have developed an algorithm that is supposed to be able to enable airport X-ray scanners to detect uranium and plutonium in bags. The algorithm works by first doing an "inverse algorithm" where it varies material composition parameters until it gets an image that matches what's coming off the X-ray, and then use some mysterious adaptive enhancement system to enhance its ability to discriminate materials from there.
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Yeah, I think it only detects uranium and plutonium, not thorium.

Sweet Brown - Ain't Nobody Got Time for That (Autotune Remix)
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Wayne Radinsky

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Startup ideas from 12-18 year old girls. "What was incredibly curious about all the solutions to the problems, they were all apps. This was incredibly intruiging to me, this group of girls (by virtue of growing up in an affluent area) all had been using iPhones/iPads from a young age, and it's clear the way they look at the world has been heavily influenced by that. When they have problems in life, the first thing they think about is whether there is an app to solve it!"

Some examples: "Problem: Menlo uses a platform called Moodle for teachers to assign homework to kids, but Moodle makes you go through every subject page seperately to figure out what homework you have. Solution: App that scrapes Moodle to compile your homework in a daily digest / class planner format." "Problem: Want to use magic trackpad or mouse, but don't want to spend money on new devices. Solution: iPhone app to make iPhone act as bluetooth multitouch trackpad or mouse (using accelerometer/gyroscope)."
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I don't care about self examination.  Just want to know what other people think or like.  Only know how to play with my phone.
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New generic top level domains. "The expansion of generic Top-Level Domains (e.g. .COM, .ORG, .NET) in the Domain Name System is underway. Over 1,300 new names or 'strings' could become available in the next few years."

This page shows the new domains as they are created, more or less (isn't real time).
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P.S. the better ones are still not assigned due to multiple requestors, and an ongoing auction process.
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Corporate acquisitions of startups -- why do they fail? "The success of the acquisition depends on whether the acquiring company intends to keep the new venture as a standalone division or integrate and assimilate it into the corporation." "If the startup is being acquired for its intellectual property and/or team, the right strategy is to integrate and assimilate it quickly." "If the startup is still in search mode, and you want the product line and users to grow at its current pace or faster, keep the startup as an independent division and appoint the existing CEO as the division head." "If the acquisition is in execution mode, the right model is to integrate and assimilate it. Combine its emerging corporate KPI’s, process and procedures with those of the acquiring company."
For decades large companies have gone shopping in Silicon Valley for startups. Lately the pressure of continuous disruption has forced them to step up the pace. More often than not the results of these acquisitions are disappointing. What can companies learn from others’ failed efforts to integrate startups into large companies? The answer - there are two types [...]
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Wayne Radinsky

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"South China's economic powerhouse of Guangzhou has set a goal of having 80 percent of the city's manufacturing production done by robots instead of human labor by 2020."

"The document says that there will be subsidies of up to 30,000 yuan (4,800 US dollars) for those who purchase or rent a robot, and a maximum one-off subsidy of 500,000 yuan for companies that introduce a complete set of automation equipment in Guangzhou, capital of Guangdong Province."
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From the local government perspective it may make sense, I'm not sure the same is true for the whole nation. Last thing China needs is a large number of angry unemployed.
They have too many people to keep competitiveness using machines, to keep people from rioting they will have to hugely increase welfare and to do so they will have to rise taxes offsetting the competitive edge machines give them.
In an automation dominated world the outsourcing paradises will be countries large enough to host factories and with a small enough population to have a low level of unemployment so they are able to keep taxes at a minimum.
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Wayne Radinsky

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An algorithm has determined that Denver is the 8th funniest city. #7 is Los Angeles and #6 is New York. Can you guess who was #1?

Apparently all the algorithm does is rank cities based on number of visits to comedy websites, the number of comedy internet searches, the number of comedy clubs per square mile (shouldn't that be per capita? Los Angeles has an awful lot of miles -- it's a suburban sprawl that goes on forever), how touring comedians ranked the cities, the number of native comedians, the number of witty local tweeters (say "witty tweeter" 100 times as fast as you can), and the number of local comedy radio stations.
DENVER -- Denver is the eighth funniest city in the United States, according to a recent University of Colorado-Boulder study released Sunday. The study was led by Peter McGraw, an associate profes...
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funny hah hah funny? or funny as i amuse you?
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Startup ideas from Jacob Sheehy. "Build a fleet of small solar-powered airplanes and helicopters that will make long-distance air deliveries autonomously." "Build the same fleet of aircraft but pack them with weather sensors and send them away from people. This fleet would gather and send live atmosphere data from over the oceans and remote land areas." "Compete with Google Drive. Drive is close to my ideal productivity suite but it has major flaws that annoy me on a daily basis." "Build a multiplayer online game about space exploration. The game scales from single player to an entire galaxy of inhabited star systems played by millions of people." "What kind of code editing can be done in an extremely mobile environment? In the near future, smart watches, glasses, etc will be gaining traction and combining these with minimal artificial intelligence constructs, I think that the software development experience could be radically altered to focus more on hard problems and less on typing code."
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Nice find, +Alex Schleber!
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Alan Adler, the man who invented the Aerobie in the 80s, apparently recently invented a funny-looking plastic thingy that resembles a plunger that makes what many consider to be the best cup of coffee in the world.
How one inventor went from making Frisbees to one of the world's best coffeemakers.
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I have it, too.
Wonderful press that results in a puck!
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Software Design and Development
Employment
  • Software Design and Development, present
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Denver
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Denver - Silicon Valley, California
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Software Design Engineer
Introduction
I'm a software engineer specializing in great design of software -- every successful large software project ever made started out as a small software project that got larger. The key to a successful large project is knowing how to design software when it is small so it is capable of growing. Poor design in the early stages leads to high-entropy software that is difficult to maintain and add new features to years down the line. Good design in the initial stages allows new software features to be added easily. Good design doesn't take any more time than poor design, but you have to know how to do it.

Certain keys are very essential to good design. The beginning is the program's data structures, which form the foundation for any software project. The key to good data structure design is to make sure that the relationships between bits of data in your data structures are the same as the relationships between the objects or ideas that those data structures represent in the minds of your users. Any time these get out of sync, you are in for trouble -- but the trouble does not usually arrive immediately -- it can arrive months or years down the line. This delayed feedback cycle is one reason many software projects run late or fail. Any time the data structures are out of sync with the minds of users, there is the temptation to "patch" the problem by adding more data structures, that form a bridge between the existing data structures, and what you want to do. These "patches" are, unfortunately, "dirty hacks", that down the road will add complexity to your software. It is this complexity -- and more to the point, *unnecessary* complexity, that makes it more difficult to maintain or extend your software with new features in the future.

It is also extremely important to design the code structure correctly. It is very common to make basic errors like using global variables. Globals are very powerful, but should be used with care -- they connect separate components of the software with each other. (And be aware that many variables are global even when they are not called "global" in your particular programming language -- they can have other names). When you *want* something to apply "everywhere", globals are the right choice, because you change them in one place and the change is applied everywhere. But more often than not, globals are used when they shouldn't be, causing a change in one part of a program to cause another part of the program, that seems unrelated, to break.

Another minefield is object oriented programming. Objects are an extremely powerful and flexible programming metaphor -- and that's the problem. They are so flexible that they can mean almost anything, and they can make it easy for you to shoot yourself in the foot with excessive complexity. In reality, there is nothing wrong with non-object-oriented programming -- proper and thoughtful use of functions and libraries of functions -- so it is not necessary to use objects everywhere or make "everything" an object in your program. In particular, there is no advantage in doing "object-relational mapping" -- if you're doing this, it means you have designed all your data structures *twice* (once in the relational data model, and again in an object-oriented model), wasting effort. Furthermore, objects should only be used when they add *clarity* to a program, when they make it easier to understand how the program works, rather than more difficult. In certain situations, such as when polymorphism is needed to solve whatever problem your software needs to solve for the user, objects are a clear benefit, simplifying the design and adding clarity to the code. In many other situations, however, excess use of objects creates obfuscation, leading to maintainability problems and difficulty adding features to your software in the future.

And it is these complexity issues that impose limitations on how big your software can get, how many features it can have, and ultimately how well your business can grow and how well you can serve your customers.
Education
  • University Of Colorado At Boulder
    Computer Science
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