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Wayne Radinsky
Attended University Of Colorado At Boulder
Lives in Denver
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Wayne Radinsky

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"This is what ugly code looks like. This is a dependency diagram -- a graphic representation of interdependence or coupling (the black lines) between software components (the gray dots) within a program. A high degree of interdependence means that changing one component inside the program could lead to cascading changes in all the other connected components, and in turn to changes in their dependencies, and so on. Programs with this kind of structure are brittle, and hard to understand and fix." Vikram Chandra waxes philosophical about the beauty (or not) of code in this excerpt from Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty.

"The Lucent 5ESS switch, used in telephone exchanges, derives its functionality from a hundred million lines of code; the 2008 Fedora 9 distribution of Linux comprises over two hundred million lines of code. No temple, no cathedral has ever contained as many moving parts."
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7 things Steve Heller learned from attending the world's largest 3D printing conference. The real money to be made in 3D printing will be from producing 3D-printed parts for final products. The way to a venture capitalist's wallet is through a successful Kickstarter campaign. HP wants to create a major step-change in 3D printing (Multi Jet Fusion). The industrial 3D printing segment may not have much mainstream visibility, but it's the most important part of the industry today. Metal 3D printing continues to be a high-growth area of the industry. Material prices will have to come down for adoption rates to increase. Disruption and innovation can come from anywhere, and this factor is really difficult for investors to account for.
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For the 25th anniversary of the Hubble space telescope, Nature did a series of "Hubble Moments" interviews, and I put them on a Youtube playlist for ya. The interviews are: Mario Livio on the Hubble Deep Field, where Hubble looked at a blank part of the sky, Jason Kalirai on how Hubble can see individual stars in galaxies, Antonella Nota on the image on the cover of every single Hubble book, Mike Massimino on the shuttle missions for servicing the Hubble telescope, and Robert Kirshner on using the Hubble to make a 25-year movie of the supernova 1987A.
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Mysterious X-37B military space plane to fly again next month. "The unmanned X-37B space plane, which looks like a miniature version of NASA's now-retired space shuttle orbiter, is scheduled to blast off atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on May 20." 

"The X-37B's payloads and specific activities are classified." But they say they're not taking weapons up to space. People think they're testing the durability of various materials in space.
 
The unmanned X-37B, which looks like a miniature version of NASA's now-retired space shuttle orbiter, is scheduled to blast off atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on May 20.
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Why Moore's Law doesn't apply to clean technologies. "Over the weekend, Moore's Law -- the prediction that the number of transistors (building blocks) on an integrated circuit (computer chip or microchip) would double every two years -- turned fifty years old. It so happens that the silicon solar panel, the dominant variety in the market today, is about the same age -- roughly fifty-two years old. And over the last half-century, while the computing power of an identically sized microchip increased by a factor of over a billion, the power output of an identically sized silicon solar panel more or less doubled."

"Moore's Law is a consequence of fundamental physics. Clean technology cost declines are not. Moore's Law is a prediction about innovation as a function of time. Clean technology cost declines are a function of experience, or production. Why this all matters Moore's Law provided a basis to expect dramatic performance improvements that shrank mainframes to mobile phones. Clean technology cost declines do not imply a similar revolution in energy."
Over the weekend, Moore’s Law—the prediction that the number of transistors (building blocks) on an integrated circuit (computer ...
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The NIST atomic clock at JILA in Boulder, CO, is now so accurate "the clock would neither gain nor lose one second in some 15 billion years -- roughly the age of the universe."

"Our performance means that we can measure the gravitational shift when you raise the clock just 2 centimeters on the Earth's surface."

The clock achieves its accuracy over previous clocks by having a more precisely controlled temperature using platinum resistance thermometers and using radiation shielding.
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FOR SCIENCE!
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Apparently Facebook has a "Safety Check" feature that, when there is an earthquake, asks people if they are safe and notifies their friends & family, and it was activated for an earthquake earlier today in Nepal.
This morning we activated Safety Check for people affected by the earthquake in Nepal. It's a simple way to let family and friends know you're okay. If...
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Interesting! Members of my family are all over the place that sometimes, I just sound in and expect a response. Facebook is the last option.
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A telesurgery robot was hacked by a team of security researchers. This turned out to be not very hard because the communications between the control console and the robot are not encrypted and the Interoperable Telesurgery Protocol is publicly available.
The first hijacking of a medical telerobot raises important questions over the security of remote surgery, say computer security experts.
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FTA: "However, encryption cannot foil every kind of attack. In particular, it still allows man-in-the-middle attacks where an eavesdropper intercepts signals in both directions while fooling both parties that they are still talking to each other."

Um. No. That most likely isn't a known vulnerability in high quality encryption protocols at this time.

DDOS yes. MITM? Maybe if you're only using ROT13.
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2015 is the year of the zettabyte. "Less than 10 years ago, it was understood that the world's entire hard-drive capacity was somewhere in the region of 160 exabytes and, in 2009, the entire internet to that date had accumulated 500 exabytes worth of data. And yet, just four years later, this had grown to a staggering four zettabytes, while we now face the reality of creating one in an entire year."

But what percentage is cat videos?
With each passing year, another mind-bogglingly large quantity of data is presented to us as the expected total produced and 2015 is no different, with expectations that we will create one zettabyte of data this year.
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+Tom Snyder, I never said the bytes being used for cat videos were 'wasted.' ;)
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A race car with over 360 3D printed parts is on display at a Chinese expo. "Students from Tongji University unveiled a one-seated electric race car which utilized 3D printing almost to an extreme. The vehicle, which featured over 362 different 3D printed parts, is incredibly light, weighing only about 30% of what a typical race car of this size would weigh. [...] Looking at the vehicle it's hard to tell that a significant portion of it is printed out. That's because the majority of the 3D printed components are within its internal structure. In fact even components within the engine are printed from aluminum."
There are so many benefits to 3D printing within the manufacturing space. It all just depends what you are using the technology for. Within the aerospace indust
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Intel is likely to employ a pair of new technologies, quantum well FETs and III-V semiconductors when they start manufacturing at 10 nanometers, according to an industry analyst.

III-V semiconductors are so called because they are made from metals from groups III and V in the periodic table. Group III has scandium and yttrium, and Group V has vanadium, niobium, tantalum and dubnium. They are guessing Intel will use InGaAs (Indium Gallium Arsenide) or InSb (indium tin) for n-type channels and strained germanium for p-type channels. "The net effect of this adoption could cut operating voltages as far as 0.5v."

"Quantum wells trap electrons by surrounding them with an insulating structure that leaves a limited number of dimensions for the electrons to move in."

"If Intel adopts these technologies at 10nm, it'll push back the window on EUV farther, back to 7nm."
Could Intel be planning a double whammy at 10nm? One analyst argues yes, and bets Intel will debut new semiconductor materials at that node -- as well as new techniques for manufacturing transistors.
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Here is a video of pyrophoric aluminum. See what happens when you pour water on it! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=si9ZeXWavYQ 
We have special fire extinguishers for our metal organics. It puts a crust on top of the burning metal, separating it from the air to smother the flames. 
Ah! I found my video, finally:  https://www.dropbox.com/s/8y5b0niocg5x04r/TEAL%20%2B%20Water%2001b.mpg?dl=0
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Microsoft invents a better way to sense hand gestures. "What Handpose's algorithm does is vastly speed up a computer's ability to accurately recognize hand gestures, up to 10 times faster. It does this by using what Fitzgibbon calls particle swarm optimization, an algorithm that reduces the Kinect's trillions of initial guesses about where your hand is into a pool of 200 likely guesses. That is then further refined until it finds a good enough match."

"Fitzgibbon reckons the difference between existing hand-recognition systems and what Handpose can do is the difference between using Graffiti on Palm OS back in the mid-'90s (essentially, a symbolic language of crude gestures that didn't actually mimic what it's like to write with a pen) and modern handwriting recognition systems, which can understand cursive, calligraphy, and more."
Handpose promises the holy grail of motion detection: fast, accurate hand recognition.
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A big part of the problem is sensor placement and hand/arm fatigue.  

I've  a Leap Motion, and it's quite slick, but I rarely use it because I have no good place to put it, and having to lift and hold my hand to interact gets tiresome.

The demos for this sort of thing all seem quite short.  In the video in the article, no one example lasts more than 30 seconds.

The Leap Motion seems to have the same degree of accuracy but there's still no UI revolution. 

It's very slick but so far, impractical for extended use.
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Software Design and Development
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  • Software Design and Development, present
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Denver
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Denver - Silicon Valley, California
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Software Design Engineer
Introduction
I'm a software engineer specializing in great design of software -- every successful large software project ever made started out as a small software project that got larger. The key to a successful large project is knowing how to design software when it is small so it is capable of growing. Poor design in the early stages leads to high-entropy software that is difficult to maintain and add new features to years down the line. Good design in the initial stages allows new software features to be added easily. Good design doesn't take any more time than poor design, but you have to know how to do it.

Certain keys are very essential to good design. The beginning is the program's data structures, which form the foundation for any software project. The key to good data structure design is to make sure that the relationships between bits of data in your data structures are the same as the relationships between the objects or ideas that those data structures represent in the minds of your users. Any time these get out of sync, you are in for trouble -- but the trouble does not usually arrive immediately -- it can arrive months or years down the line. This delayed feedback cycle is one reason many software projects run late or fail. Any time the data structures are out of sync with the minds of users, there is the temptation to "patch" the problem by adding more data structures, that form a bridge between the existing data structures, and what you want to do. These "patches" are, unfortunately, "dirty hacks", that down the road will add complexity to your software. It is this complexity -- and more to the point, *unnecessary* complexity, that makes it more difficult to maintain or extend your software with new features in the future.

It is also extremely important to design the code structure correctly. It is very common to make basic errors like using global variables. Globals are very powerful, but should be used with care -- they connect separate components of the software with each other. (And be aware that many variables are global even when they are not called "global" in your particular programming language -- they can have other names). When you *want* something to apply "everywhere", globals are the right choice, because you change them in one place and the change is applied everywhere. But more often than not, globals are used when they shouldn't be, causing a change in one part of a program to cause another part of the program, that seems unrelated, to break.

Another minefield is object oriented programming. Objects are an extremely powerful and flexible programming metaphor -- and that's the problem. They are so flexible that they can mean almost anything, and they can make it easy for you to shoot yourself in the foot with excessive complexity. In reality, there is nothing wrong with non-object-oriented programming -- proper and thoughtful use of functions and libraries of functions -- so it is not necessary to use objects everywhere or make "everything" an object in your program. In particular, there is no advantage in doing "object-relational mapping" -- if you're doing this, it means you have designed all your data structures *twice* (once in the relational data model, and again in an object-oriented model), wasting effort. Furthermore, objects should only be used when they add *clarity* to a program, when they make it easier to understand how the program works, rather than more difficult. In certain situations, such as when polymorphism is needed to solve whatever problem your software needs to solve for the user, objects are a clear benefit, simplifying the design and adding clarity to the code. In many other situations, however, excess use of objects creates obfuscation, leading to maintainability problems and difficulty adding features to your software in the future.

And it is these complexity issues that impose limitations on how big your software can get, how many features it can have, and ultimately how well your business can grow and how well you can serve your customers.
Education
  • University Of Colorado At Boulder
    Computer Science
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