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Wayne Radinsky
Attended University Of Colorado At Boulder
Lives in Denver
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Software Design and Development
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  • Software Design and Development, present
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Denver
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Denver - Silicon Valley, California
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Software Design Engineer
Introduction
I'm a software engineer specializing in great design of software -- every successful large software project ever made started out as a small software project that got larger. The key to a successful large project is knowing how to design software when it is small so it is capable of growing. Poor design in the early stages leads to high-entropy software that is difficult to maintain and add new features to years down the line. Good design in the initial stages allows new software features to be added easily. Good design doesn't take any more time than poor design, but you have to know how to do it.

Certain keys are very essential to good design. The beginning is the program's data structures, which form the foundation for any software project. The key to good data structure design is to make sure that the relationships between bits of data in your data structures are the same as the relationships between the objects or ideas that those data structures represent in the minds of your users. Any time these get out of sync, you are in for trouble -- but the trouble does not usually arrive immediately -- it can arrive months or years down the line. This delayed feedback cycle is one reason many software projects run late or fail. Any time the data structures are out of sync with the minds of users, there is the temptation to "patch" the problem by adding more data structures, that form a bridge between the existing data structures, and what you want to do. These "patches" are, unfortunately, "dirty hacks", that down the road will add complexity to your software. It is this complexity -- and more to the point, *unnecessary* complexity, that makes it more difficult to maintain or extend your software with new features in the future.

It is also extremely important to design the code structure correctly. It is very common to make basic errors like using global variables. Globals are very powerful, but should be used with care -- they connect separate components of the software with each other. (And be aware that many variables are global even when they are not called "global" in your particular programming language -- they can have other names). When you *want* something to apply "everywhere", globals are the right choice, because you change them in one place and the change is applied everywhere. But more often than not, globals are used when they shouldn't be, causing a change in one part of a program to cause another part of the program, that seems unrelated, to break.

Another minefield is object oriented programming. Objects are an extremely powerful and flexible programming metaphor -- and that's the problem. They are so flexible that they can mean almost anything, and they can make it easy for you to shoot yourself in the foot with excessive complexity. In reality, there is nothing wrong with non-object-oriented programming -- proper and thoughtful use of functions and libraries of functions -- so it is not necessary to use objects everywhere or make "everything" an object in your program. In particular, there is no advantage in doing "object-relational mapping" -- if you're doing this, it means you have designed all your data structures *twice* (once in the relational data model, and again in an object-oriented model), wasting effort. Furthermore, objects should only be used when they add *clarity* to a program, when they make it easier to understand how the program works, rather than more difficult. In certain situations, such as when polymorphism is needed to solve whatever problem your software needs to solve for the user, objects are a clear benefit, simplifying the design and adding clarity to the code. In many other situations, however, excess use of objects creates obfuscation, leading to maintainability problems and difficulty adding features to your software in the future.

And it is these complexity issues that impose limitations on how big your software can get, how many features it can have, and ultimately how well your business can grow and how well you can serve your customers.
Education
  • University Of Colorado At Boulder
    Computer Science
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Wayne Radinsky

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The Internet Age officially began 40 years ago today (August 27th), when scientists from SRI International in Menlo Park, California, sent an electronic message from a computer set up at a picnic table behind the Alpine Inn via a radio network to SRI and on through a second network, the ARPANET, to Boston.
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So you want to be a venture capitalist? Well, who doesn't? But wait, it's not all fun and games, as VC backed companies, and VC firms themselves in turn, often fail. This article has links to downsides to being a VC and lists of dozens of postmortems of VC-backed companies that failed. But if you still want to be a VC, there's a "Beginner's Guide To VC".
We decided to make this list as a jumping-off point for startup founders, journalists, aspiring investors and the curious to get themselves up to speed on how the VC space works, often from an insider’s perspective.
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2D fluid simulation with WebGL, along with an explanation of how it's built. It starts with color (think ink in water) and velocity vector fields, then advection, which accounts for the motion of the colors and velocities. But because liquid is essentially incompressible, divergent and convergent velocity vectors have to be removed. This requires employing the Navier-Stokes equations that describe the motion of fluids.
Note: The demos in this post rely on WebGL features that might not be implemented in mobile browsers. About a year and a half ago, I had a passing interest in trying to figure out how to make a fluid simulation. At the time, it felt just a bit out of my reach, requiring knowledge of shaders, ...
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Facebook is replacing all their human "trending topics" news curators with algorithms. Apparently the people who worked on curating "trending topics" joked that they were actually training robots to do their jobs, and the joke turned out to be true.
Humans will no longer be writing the news at the world’s largest social networking site.
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If it used their decisions as training data, it should have their biases.
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A genome editing technique that does not cleave DNA has been developed. "It is possible to modify genetic function by inducing target 'point mutation' at a highly efficient rate. The point mutation was induced by forming a synthetic complex through removal of nuclease activity from the CRISPR system -- a technique using artificial nuclease -- and addition of deaminase, a deaminizing (base-modifying) enzyme, and then expressing it in yeasts and mammalian cells. Moreover, it was confirmed that, compared to previous nuclease models, cytotoxicity is significantly reduced by modifying the DNA without cutting." By "cytotoxicity" they are referring to the harm caused to the cell by the splitting of chromosomes.
A team involving Kobe University researchers has succeeded in developing ‘Target-AID’, a genome editing techni...
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Deamination is the process by which amino acids are broken down if there is an excess of protein intake. The amino group is removed from the amino acid and converted to ammonia. The rest of the amino acid is made up of mostly carbon and hydrogen, and is recycled or oxidized for energy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deamination
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A new system that detects when senior citizens fall, or when their gait speed and stride length change in ways that predict likely falls, has been developed, but the system does not involve putting any sensors on the person -- instead it works by analyzing images from cameras placed around the home.
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Wayne Radinsky

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A curated list of deep learning resources for computer vision. With sections on papers, ImageNet classification, object detection, object tracking, low-level vision, super-resolution, other applications, edge detection, semantic segmentation, visual attention and saliency, object recognition, understanding convolutional neural networks (CNN), image and language, image captioning, video captioning, question answering, image generation, other topics, courses, books, videos, software, framework, applications, tutorials, and blogs.
awesome-deep-vision - A curated list of deep learning resources for computer vision
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"Pentagon scientists worry that the U.S. could be on the losing side of a AI arms race."

"The Defense Science Board's much-anticipated 'Autonomy' study sees promise and peril in the years ahead. The good news: autonomy, artificial intelligence, and machine learning could revolutionize the way the military spies on enemies, defends its troops, or speeds its supplies to the front lines. The bad news: AI in commercial and academic settings is moving faster than the military can keep up. Among the most startling recommendations in the study: the United States should take 'immediate action' to figure out how to defeat new AI-enabled operations."

I don't see the link to the report. It is

http://www.acq.osd.mil/dsb/reports/DSBSS15.pdf

You should probably be forewarned that it's 121 pages. The part they are referring to is page 58 in the PDF, which is page 44 according to the numbers that appear on the pages inside the PDF.
Pentagon scientists worry that the U.S. could be on the losing side of a AI arms race.
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Of course the US is on the loosing side of the arms race--if you can call it that--that's what happens when you don't hire tech talent because they lack a degree.
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"'No Man's Sky' shows what algorithms can and can't do." They can give birth to 18 quintillion planets. They can't make them feel alive.

I did some posts about No Man's Sky and sometimes mentioned that the impressive algorithms didn't guarantee the gameplay would actually be fun.

The writer suggests making it multiplayer in a way that enables user-generated content and the ability for players to "collaborate and build their own story."
The physics-based, randomly generated universe is missing intelligent design.
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I don't have any problem with adding a bit of weirdness for interests sake. After all, we don't know squat about cosmology and exactly what it would be like when we finally come up with a unified field theory so there is plenty of room to through in things like multiverse, "magic", remnants of civilizations we can't hope to understand, etc. I feel that the most important part is getting the user to forget they are part of a game. 
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How fast is it possible to make electrons go with electric fields? A technique that uses two lasers, one to excite electrons and another to probe the electrons' state has been refined to bring the light pulses into the femtosecond and attosecond ranges with wavelengths around 30 nanometers. They are looking for ways to develop electronics that switch at petahertz speeds.

"The fact that we could still see that effect even at petahertz excitation frequencies confirmed that the electrons could, indeed, be influenced at the speed limit of the laser field" "The dynamical interaction is also of fundamental interest as it appears in a regime that is neither dominated by quantum mechanical nor by classical light-matter interactions. This means that two kinds of physical effects simultaneously play a role: those in which light acts as energy quanta (photons), and those in which it is represented by a classical electromagnetic field."
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Hm. Question: Does this article say that the electrons in the diamond react to the light at the same frequency of the light pulse (1:1) or that the electrons react to the very short duration of the light pulse (1: frequency of light * duration of pulse)?
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"External mechanical force can directly regulate gene expression."

"The researchers stuck tiny magnetic beads to proteins attached to the external membranes of hamster cells. They were able to change the direction and angle of the force the beads exerted while maintaining a consistent magnitude of the force, and found that the external force directly caused regions of chromatin in the nucleus to stretch out. Chromatin is the condensed DNA and protein mixture that makes up chromosomes. Using advanced imaging techniques, the researchers found an increase in transcription of the genes in the stretched regions."
The News Bureau, part of Public Affairs, generates and coordinates news coverage of the Urbana-Champaign campus.
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"After weeks of rumors and unconfirmed reports, European scientists have officially announced the discovery of an Earth-sized world around the closest star to the Sun, Proxima Centauri. Although the planet theoretically orbits its star in a region where water could exist as a liquid on its surface, no direct information can be gleaned about whether Proxima b has an atmosphere, water, or other characteristics that would increase its habitability." Proxima Centauri is 4.2 light years from the Sun and part of a three-star system that includes Alpha Centauri A and B.
The big question is whether Proxima b has an atmosphere or is a cold, dead world.
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