Profile

Cover photo
Wayne Radinsky
Attended University Of Colorado At Boulder
Lives in Denver
15,976 followers|10,746,091 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotos

Stream

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
Scientists use 'therapeutic cloning' to fix mitochondrial genes. "US researchers have used a controversial cloning technique to make new, healthy, perfectly matched stem cells from the skin of patients with mitochondrial diseases in a first step toward treatment for these incurable, life-threatening conditions."

The experiment was done using starting from cells from people with the mitochondrial diseases MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy), which causes deterioration of the brain, central nervious system and muscles, and an increased acidity of the blood called lactic acidosis, and Leigh syndrome, a neurological disorder that causes progressive loss of mental ability and motor movement that typically results in death from respiratory failure in a couple of years.

There are two ways to produce the corrected cells. One is a clonin technique called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), where you take an egg cell, take the genes out of the nucleus and replace them with genes from the patient cell, while leaving the mitochondria alone, or a method of reprogramming adult skin cells to act like stem cells, then segregating the cells based on whether the mitochondria have the healthy or diseased version of the genes.
U.S. researchers have used a controversial cloning technique to make new, healthy, perfectly matched stem cells from the skin of patients with mitochondrial diseases in a first step toward treatment for these incurable, life-threatening conditions.
9
6
AQ Medicare's profile photoDen Sinned's profile photosuparna dhar's profile photoPierluigi  Ballini 's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Emmanuel Bourmault
There will be places that will do it ... you may have to leave the country however.
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
"A common misconception about tech startups is that they sprout out of thin air. It's romantic to think that all a person needs is a good idea and the communication skills to convey it to interested investors, but the truth is often more prosaic. Successful new businesses are usually offshoots from established ones. Nest, the smart home appliance maker that was acquired by Google for $3.2 billion last year, was started by a pair of Apple veterans."

"Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Amazon: all the modern giants of software and services are US companies. Samsung, Lenovo, Foxconn, and Sony: all the manufacturing leaders are in Asia. I look for similar strength in Europe, and all I see is Spotify and... Archos."
I’m a European, in the full, quixotic, let’s-all-be-friends sense of the word. I prefer the present, highly imperfect European Union over the past of nationalistic disunity and warmongering strife....
8
2
Simon Laufer's profile photoTitan ThinkTank's profile photoDaria Forbes's profile photoWe Are Innovation's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Simon Laufer
even after tech singularity ?
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
Seeing Pluto in a new light. I made a Youtube playlist of NASA press briefings on Pluto. Pluto has a greater diversity of terrain than expected, a "youthful surface," lacking impact craters, and a diversity of chemical composition on the surface, suggesting there are more processes involved in the surface than expected. It has complex icy frozen plains next to ice mountains the size of the Rockies.

The plains have dark material troughs, pitted surfaces, and hills. There could be wind streaks. The western lobe of the "heart" is the source material for the eastern and southern lobes. The surface spectra show methane, nitrogen, and the "heart" region has carbon monoxide, but regions other than the "heart" don't have carbon monoxide. Polygonal cells are seen next to an eroded rugged area with impact craters with "streamlines", which are glaciers made of nitrogen ice. The temperature on Pluto on the surface is 38 Kelvin, which is about -380 Fahrenheit (-235 Celsius). At that temperature, nitrogen is solid but soft and can form glacial flows. Nitrogen ice flows are powered, not by sunlight, but by internal energy from within Pluto.

Pluto shows no aberration from a sphere, which was expected based on theories about how Pluto and Charon formed as a system.

The atmosphere is not turbulent, has molecular nitrogen at the highest altitudes, methane lower down, and heavier hydrocarbons below that. The nitrogen is probably escaping. Charon either has no atmosphere or an extremely rarefied atmosphere, unlike Pluto. Pluto has a "haze layer" in its atmosphere that extends more than 50 miles above the surface, seen from behind as a bright "ring." Hydrocarbons falling out of the "haze layer" of the atmosphere is what gave Pluto its slightly reddish hue.

Stellar occultation data from earth observations from previous years showed surface atmospheric pressure increasing, but the spacecraft measurements show surface atmospheric pressure is lower that expected. 

New Horizons may have arrived at Pluto right as the atmosphere started to collapse.

Tholins, which are complex organic molecules formed when solar radiation hits simple organic compounds such as methane or ethane, are believed to be the reason for the horizontal bands, which you see extending down from the north pole, except in the "heart" region.
4
Plautus Satire's profile photo
38 comments
 
+Wayne Radinsky you're free to debate about "how" electric discharges form craters but experimental verification demonstrates beyond doubt that they do. 
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
An AI that can predict the effects of gene editing has been developed by a startup. But apparently its predictive power is limited to predicting the effect of the gene editing on the splicing mechanism. Gene splicing is the process where, after the gene is transcribed to RNA, it is modified again before being turned into an amino acid sequence, such as by removing portions or changing where protein sequences are started and stopped.
Can a Canadian startup with some big names attached set itself apart in the competitive world of bioinformatics?
11
2
Sophie Wrobel's profile photoWayne Radinsky's profile photoAlan Lovejoy's profile photoSterling Leavitt's profile photo
2 comments
 
It doesn't work by solving the protein folding problem, it works by some type of machine learning system, which means it is finding patterns in data that's already been gathered.
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
A new object recognition system has been developed that, instead of recognizing objects frame-by-frame, incorporates knowledge of where the robot is in its environment and how it is moving. The system is considered a proof-of-concept and it is expected to lead to much more robust object recognition systems.
Robots’ maps of their environments can make existing object-recognition algorithms more accurate.
11
2
Trond Arild Tjøstheim's profile photoTerrence Lee Reed's profile photo
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
"HORNET, a proposed anonymizing network architecture based on an 'onion routing' approach similar to Tor, could be much faster and integrated directly into Internet infrastructure."

"The researchers build HORNET infrastructure code into Intel software routers using the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK). HORNET client code, which included hidden services, was built in Python." "To our knowledge, no other anonymity protocols have been implemented in a router SDK."
HORNET, a high-speed onion routing network, could be deployed on routers as part of the Internet.
25
15
Daria Forbes's profile photoRon Michel's profile photoGary Richmond's profile photoNeike Taika-Tessaro's profile photo
6 comments
 
mmmmmnnnmn honeypots. 
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
15,976 people
Taimoor Gulastar khan's profile photo
Puranjay Gupta's profile photo
larry FOREST's profile photo
Mohamed Haggag's profile photo
Vinod Goyal's profile photo
MD NURUL ABSAR JANI's profile photo
Andres Bladimir Lara Morales's profile photo
Caroline Hickney's profile photo
Yassar Sarhan's profile photo

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
DeepBind is a deep learning system that "can analyze noisy experimental data to determine the DNA and RNA sequences to which a set of proteins will bind. Then, it can look at a new sequence and compute a score saying how likely it is that any of these proteins would bind to it. Given a sequence with a mutation, the tool can analyze whether binding changes. Mutations that add or delete protein binding sites can alter gene expression patterns and lead to disease."
A new tool called DeepBind uses deep learning to analyze how proteins bind to DNA and RNA, allowing it to detect mutations that could disrupt cellular processes and cause disease.
6
2
Titan ThinkTank's profile photoLouis-Philippe Reid's profile photoBoris Borcic's profile photo
 
So if we need super human muscles we can use this to reverse engineer  and create new genes.
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
Taehyoung Kim of South Korea won the 2015 International Physics Olympiad. The problems were about the diffraction of a helical structure, diffraction due to surface tension waves on the surface of water, calculations of photons and neutrinos from the sun, the extremum principle, which describes how the movement of a particle changes when it changes into a domain with different potential energy, such as when light refracts when changing from one medium to another, and calculations for the design of a nuclear (uranium) reactor.
International Physics Olympiad, 2015, Mumbai India
5
1
Lisa Clanton's profile photo
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
The fruit fly may know it's bugging you. Well, actually what the experiment tested is whether or not the brain of the fruit fly drosophila melanogaster can distinguish whether or not changes in the environment are caused by the fly's own actions. Which it can. The experiment was done by making a virtual object that flickers at a specific frequency, 7 Hz, which either was or was not under the fly's control, and they could track the 7 Hz signal through the fly's brain. How exactly they got "frequency tags" into the fly brains to monitor them is not clear. The fly's brain has about 100,000 neurons, compared with 100 billion for humans.
7
1
Daniel Estrada's profile photoWayne Radinsky's profile photoTitan ThinkTank's profile photoEvo Lumin's profile photo
3 comments
 
so its aware about itself
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Quest for Quakes" is a competition run by NASA for finding algorithms that can detect electromagnetic pulses that predict earthquakes in data collected on the earth's magnetic field.
A new NASA challenge is looking for evidence to support a theory that electromagnetic pulses (EMP) may precede an earthquake, potentially offering a warning to those in the quake’s path.
8
4
CADGIS's profile photoWolf Bergenheim's profile photo
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
A New York teen invented a real-life closed captioning system. It's "an 'auto-head display,' not unlike Google Glass, with a mic to pick up speech and a microcomputer to give the words phonetic form."

"It's one of those things you can't believe Google Glass didn't think of..." Come to think of it, why didn't Google think of it?
The 16-year-old's device could change the way deaf people communicate.
7
4
Daria Forbes's profile photoEvo Lumin's profile photoDave Taht's profile photoBill Grasser's profile photo
 
Let the bidding begin!

BTW, has Apple sued him yet?
Add a comment...

Wayne Radinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
The epidermis of the skin of three astronauts who had their skin scanned with femtosecond lasers before and after their missions on the ISS got 20% thinner and collagen in the dermis layer increased. Apparently femtosecond lasers can produce images with a spatial resolution a thousand times higher than that of ultrasonic devices and reveal information without the need for taking biopsies. As people age, the epidermis gets thinner and collagen decreases, so the changes from being on the ISS are opposite of aging in one effect and in the same direction for the other.
Commissioned by Nasa and Esa as part of the latter’s Skin B project, Saarland University scanned the skin of three astronauts - including Samantha Cristoforetti (pictured).
7
Add a comment...
Wayne's Collections
People
Have him in circles
15,976 people
Taimoor Gulastar khan's profile photo
Puranjay Gupta's profile photo
larry FOREST's profile photo
Mohamed Haggag's profile photo
Vinod Goyal's profile photo
MD NURUL ABSAR JANI's profile photo
Andres Bladimir Lara Morales's profile photo
Caroline Hickney's profile photo
Yassar Sarhan's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Software Design and Development
Employment
  • Software Design and Development, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Denver
Previously
Denver - Silicon Valley, California
Links
Contributor to
Story
Tagline
Software Design Engineer
Introduction
I'm a software engineer specializing in great design of software -- every successful large software project ever made started out as a small software project that got larger. The key to a successful large project is knowing how to design software when it is small so it is capable of growing. Poor design in the early stages leads to high-entropy software that is difficult to maintain and add new features to years down the line. Good design in the initial stages allows new software features to be added easily. Good design doesn't take any more time than poor design, but you have to know how to do it.

Certain keys are very essential to good design. The beginning is the program's data structures, which form the foundation for any software project. The key to good data structure design is to make sure that the relationships between bits of data in your data structures are the same as the relationships between the objects or ideas that those data structures represent in the minds of your users. Any time these get out of sync, you are in for trouble -- but the trouble does not usually arrive immediately -- it can arrive months or years down the line. This delayed feedback cycle is one reason many software projects run late or fail. Any time the data structures are out of sync with the minds of users, there is the temptation to "patch" the problem by adding more data structures, that form a bridge between the existing data structures, and what you want to do. These "patches" are, unfortunately, "dirty hacks", that down the road will add complexity to your software. It is this complexity -- and more to the point, *unnecessary* complexity, that makes it more difficult to maintain or extend your software with new features in the future.

It is also extremely important to design the code structure correctly. It is very common to make basic errors like using global variables. Globals are very powerful, but should be used with care -- they connect separate components of the software with each other. (And be aware that many variables are global even when they are not called "global" in your particular programming language -- they can have other names). When you *want* something to apply "everywhere", globals are the right choice, because you change them in one place and the change is applied everywhere. But more often than not, globals are used when they shouldn't be, causing a change in one part of a program to cause another part of the program, that seems unrelated, to break.

Another minefield is object oriented programming. Objects are an extremely powerful and flexible programming metaphor -- and that's the problem. They are so flexible that they can mean almost anything, and they can make it easy for you to shoot yourself in the foot with excessive complexity. In reality, there is nothing wrong with non-object-oriented programming -- proper and thoughtful use of functions and libraries of functions -- so it is not necessary to use objects everywhere or make "everything" an object in your program. In particular, there is no advantage in doing "object-relational mapping" -- if you're doing this, it means you have designed all your data structures *twice* (once in the relational data model, and again in an object-oriented model), wasting effort. Furthermore, objects should only be used when they add *clarity* to a program, when they make it easier to understand how the program works, rather than more difficult. In certain situations, such as when polymorphism is needed to solve whatever problem your software needs to solve for the user, objects are a clear benefit, simplifying the design and adding clarity to the code. In many other situations, however, excess use of objects creates obfuscation, leading to maintainability problems and difficulty adding features to your software in the future.

And it is these complexity issues that impose limitations on how big your software can get, how many features it can have, and ultimately how well your business can grow and how well you can serve your customers.
Education
  • University Of Colorado At Boulder
    Computer Science
Basic Information
Gender
Male