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Wayne Radinsky
Attended University Of Colorado At Boulder
Lives in Denver
14,313 followers|6,048,389 views
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Wayne Radinsky

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Financial institutions across London all keep their own slightly different time, which enables high-frequency traders to exploit gaps such as how last year, Reuters admitted releasing manufacturing data 15 milliseconds before official publication due to a clock synchronisation issue, and algorithms instantly pounced on the early information, trading an estimated $28 million in shares in that 15 millisecond interval. That will soon be stopped by using the atomic clock at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in Teddington to keep all the financial institutions' clocks in sync. Nothing similar will be done in the US because the US atomic clock is in Boulder, Colorado, far from New York which is the financial center of the country. But an atomic clock could be built in New York for the same purpose.
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That's plaster on a wooden leg...
High-speed trading should be outlawed. Actually, a lot of trading activity should be outlawed, but that's a different story.
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Wayne Radinsky

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A US government-funded effort to create a Twitter-like social network in Cuba called ZunZuneo was exposed this month. It was done by USAID, not an intelligence agency like the CIA, and peppered users with casual surveys and quizzes to try to figure out their ideological. Perhaps the plans were to make people most sympathetic to the US the most influential on the network. In Mexico, actual people, rather than bots, are hired to tweet for political candidates. On Tinder,  users who swiped "yes" to attractive women and later asked "what are you up to" would get "Right now i'm relaxing a bit and playing castle clash on my phone. Have you heard about that game?" OkCupid wants to build cognitive security into its site, by designing its own defense bots "that will flirt with invader bots, courting them into a special room, 'a purgatory of sorts,' to talk to one another rather than fooling the humans." All this stuff is being called "cognitive hacking" now.
Social media deception campaigns are growing more sophisticated.
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In 1882, an Italian physiologist, Angelo Mosso, invented a system for measuring blood flow in the brain -- the same principle as modern fMRI machines, but of course not the same resolution -- by detecting the change in weight using balance scales.
New translations of early neuroscience reveal how in 1882 one Italian physiologist was able to measure blood flow changes in the brain
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Wayne Radinsky

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Magnetically actuated micro-robots for advanced manipulation applications. So the board itself produces magnetic fields which move the "micro-robots" around, quite accurately and fast apparently. By adding "end effectors" the robots can be used to perform tasks such as gluing together carbon fiber rods and assembling them into a truss.
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+Philosopher Rex, I get it all from +Jeff Dean. Haha, just kidding, but I did get this one from him, and thank you for reminding me I forgot to hat tip him. So, hat tip +Jeff Dean. Anyway, thanks for the kind words, glad you like the posts, and no, not an alien... and not planning on leaving this planet; I rather like it here :)
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Google said today that the algorithms it has developed for reading numbers on houses on images from Google Street View can now beat captchas. "We found that it can decipher the hardest distorted text puzzles from reCAPTCHA with over 99% accuracy."
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Most of the time even humans can't do captchas. They're a pain
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"Slater Victoroff and Alec Radford of Olin College of Engineering are looking to make machine learning as simple as any other programming function. That's why they developed Indico, a platform for machine learning and data science." They "got the idea for Indico from Kaggle, a large-scale data competition that the two began competing in during their sophomore year. On Kaggle, top PhD and post-docs from around the world compete on this platform for 'fortune, fame, and fun.' At first, Victoroff and Radford started competing as a hobby, but when they found themselves ranked as 66 out of 150,000, they thought it might be time to start something in this space."
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AISight (pronounced "eyesight") from Behavioral Recognition Systems, Inc, is a system that learns what is "suspicious" in CCTV footage without any human programming. It watches the CCTV cameras and learns what is "normal". The system does not need to be reprogrammed when "normal" behavior changes. The company promises the system works across huge, disparate networks of outdated camera equipment. The company claims that it needs maximum of only a few days for the complete hardware and software installation. After that, the system autonomously builds "an ever-changing knowledgebase of activity seen through every camera on your video network." Other than saying the system is based on "artificial neural networks", the article says nothing about how the systems work. (A quick glance at the the company's website didn't reveal anything either.)
Imagine a major city completely covered by a video surveillance system designed to monitor the every move of its citizens, run by a fast-learning...
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+Wayne Radinsky damn! I forgot to consider the type of people occupying the jobs this technology intends to take over. You are so right.
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We're seeing the first glimpses of a new economic system entering onto the world stage, the first new system since the advent of capitalism, and its antagonist, socialism, says Jeremy Rifkin. The new system is the collaborative commons, and what's triggering a shift to this new paradigm is zero marginal cost. Zero marginal cost is when the cost of producing an additional unit of a good or service after your fixed costs are covered go to zero. The paradox at the center of the capitalist system is the success of the invisible hand leads to its own demise.

Businesses have always sought reduction of marginal costs to increase profits, but never imagined they could go to near-zero. When that happens, goods and services go beyond the market exchange economy. As consumers became pro-sumers, newspapers went out of business. People going from free-mium to premium was wishful thinking. The notion that zero marginal cost won't cross the wall from virtual goods and services to the physical world is also wishful thinking. The internet is expanding to "an internet of things". By 2030 we will have a hundred trillion sensors.

For energy, solar has near zero marginal cost. Once you've paid for the installation of the solar panels, each unit of electricity is essentially free -- near zero marginal cost. When millions of people share knowledge on Wikipedia, they wipe out the encyclopedia industry. When millions of people share energy on an internet of energy, they wipe out the conventional energy industry.

What will people do for work after the zero marginal cost revolution? He says the answer is the social commons.

The same concept applied to employment is near-zero marginal cost labor. We have workerless factories and virtual retailing We're eliminating knowledge workers, like accountants, attorneys, and radiologists -- we can do it with software. There's going to be one last surge of wage labor in the next 30 years, and that's to build out the infrastructure for the internet of things.

Driverless cars and fuel cell vehicles powered by renewables will do the same thing to transportation. Airbnb's success is zero marginal cost. They have the web, they have the homes and apartments -- the fixed costs are already paid, they're already paying the mortgage. The marginal cost is near zero; how to the hotel chains compete?

We have a generation growing up thinking it's not about ownership, it's access. As people share what they have, less has to be produced.

Employment will all be in the social commons, where people create social capital.
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They won't go quietly, on this you can rely.
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"To what extent, if at all, do you feel that today's youth will have had a better or worse life than their parent's generation?" China: 81% say better, Britain: 20%, Spain: 16%, Belgium 13%, France 7%. 

For the OECD nations as a whole, 34% said better, 42% said worse.
Ipsos Mori survey of adults in 20 countries finds that those in richer countries fear their nations' best days are behind them • Will your generation have a better life than your parents'? See how the data breaks down
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It's all relative.
I'm sure overweight people who smoke are probably more likely to end up healthier in two years compared to their previous year than fitness freaks.  If only I was a smoker : seems like an easy way to start saving money and getting healthier :)
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Retail jobs have shifted from department stores (JC Penny) to supercenters (Wal-mart). Highest losses have been music stores, mobile home dealers (?), photo stores, and florists (?), and computer stores. "The business of selling stuff is becoming much more efficient. Sales-per-employee have gone from $12,00 to $25,000 in the last two decades. That means that even as consumers spend more, we need fewer workers to stock shelves and process orders. One reason retail has become so efficient is that more of it is happening across Internet cables rather than across registers. E-commerce is gobbling up one percentage point of total sales every two-and-a-half years. Call it the Amazon Effect."
There's never been a better time to be a consumer. It's not such a happy story for the people on the shopping floor and behind the counters.
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صباح الخير Hi wayne
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Have him in circles
14,313 people
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Software Design and Development
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  • Software Design and Development, present
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Denver
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Denver - Silicon Valley, California
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Software Design Engineer
Introduction
I'm a software engineer specializing in great design of software -- every successful large software project ever made started out as a small software project that got larger. The key to a successful large project is knowing how to design software when it is small so it is capable of growing. Poor design in the early stages leads to high-entropy software that is difficult to maintain and add new features to years down the line. Good design in the initial stages allows new software features to be added easily. Good design doesn't take any more time than poor design, but you have to know how to do it.

Certain keys are very essential to good design. The beginning is the program's data structures, which form the foundation for any software project. The key to good data structure design is to make sure that the relationships between bits of data in your data structures are the same as the relationships between the objects or ideas that those data structures represent in the minds of your users. Any time these get out of sync, you are in for trouble -- but the trouble does not usually arrive immediately -- it can arrive months or years down the line. This delayed feedback cycle is one reason many software projects run late or fail. Any time the data structures are out of sync with the minds of users, there is the temptation to "patch" the problem by adding more data structures, that form a bridge between the existing data structures, and what you want to do. These "patches" are, unfortunately, "dirty hacks", that down the road will add complexity to your software. It is this complexity -- and more to the point, *unnecessary* complexity, that makes it more difficult to maintain or extend your software with new features in the future.

It is also extremely important to design the code structure correctly. It is very common to make basic errors like using global variables. Globals are very powerful, but should be used with care -- they connect separate components of the software with each other. (And be aware that many variables are global even when they are not called "global" in your particular programming language -- they can have other names). When you *want* something to apply "everywhere", globals are the right choice, because you change them in one place and the change is applied everywhere. But more often than not, globals are used when they shouldn't be, causing a change in one part of a program to cause another part of the program, that seems unrelated, to break.

Another minefield is object oriented programming. Objects are an extremely powerful and flexible programming metaphor -- and that's the problem. They are so flexible that they can mean almost anything, and they can make it easy for you to shoot yourself in the foot with excessive complexity. In reality, there is nothing wrong with non-object-oriented programming -- proper and thoughtful use of functions and libraries of functions -- so it is not necessary to use objects everywhere or make "everything" an object in your program. In particular, there is no advantage in doing "object-relational mapping" -- if you're doing this, it means you have designed all your data structures *twice* (once in the relational data model, and again in an object-oriented model), wasting effort. Furthermore, objects should only be used when they add *clarity* to a program, when they make it easier to understand how the program works, rather than more difficult. In certain situations, such as when polymorphism is needed to solve whatever problem your software needs to solve for the user, objects are a clear benefit, simplifying the design and adding clarity to the code. In many other situations, however, excess use of objects creates obfuscation, leading to maintainability problems and difficulty adding features to your software in the future.

And it is these complexity issues that impose limitations on how big your software can get, how many features it can have, and ultimately how well your business can grow and how well you can serve your customers.
Education
  • University Of Colorado At Boulder
    Computer Science
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