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Warren Strange
Works at ForgeRock
Attended SFU
Lives in Calgary, Alberta. Cabarete, DR
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Warren Strange

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The final Tragically Hip concert to be broadcast live on the CBC.

Saturday - 8:30 PM EST

You don't want to miss this...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/how-to-watch-tragically-hip-concert-aug20-1.3724916
The countdown is on. Tragically Hip fans across Canada are prepping for the Man Machine Poem tour finale in the band's hometown of Kingston, Ont., on Saturday.
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A thought provoking article from Tim Bray on free markets and capitalism.

https://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/201x/2016/06/04/On-the-Left
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Creating an internal CA and signed server certificates for OpenDJ using cfssl, keytool and openssl
Yes, that title is quite a mouthful, and mostly intended to get the Google juice if I need to find this entry again. I spent a couple of hours figuring out the magical incantations, so thought I would document this here. The problem: You want OpenDJ to use ...
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National Spelling Bee calls out a looser loser.

#epic
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Warren Strange originally shared:
 

Just a few pics from our recent ski tour on the Wapta Icefield.

This is like being on another planet. Ice, snow and rock as far as the eye can see. Something that everyone should experience at least once in their life.

The complete album is here: https://goo.gl/photos/bkzjPcpvVxS4TVVX8


12 new photos · Album by Warren Strange
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Good for you guys! 
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OpenDJ Pets on Kubernetes
Stateless "12-factor" applications are all the rage, but there are some kinds of services that are inherently stateful. Good examples are things like relational databases (Postgres, MySQL) and NoSQL databases (Cassandra, etc). These services are difficult t...
Stateless "12-factor" applications are all the rage, but there are some kinds of services that are inherently stateful. Good examples are things like relational databases (Postgres, MySQL) and NoSQL databases (Cassandra, etc)...
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I didn't have the opportunity to take a lot of pics today - but grabbed a "summit" photo from my very first multi-pitch climb.

Gabrielle from the ACC led this mixed sport / trad route. I felt I was in good hands.

This route is called "Kid Goat" and is just west of Yamnuska - about 50 min drive from Calgary.

We met up with a group of climbers who flew all the way from Washington DC for a weekend of climbing. I'll never complain about the drive again!


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Kudos to my crazy adrenaline junkie husband.
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Dart FTW
In the last month, I've experimented with many frameworks and multiple languages to find a fitting tool for a new project. I've played around with KotlinJS.
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A nice article by my son James

I taught the kid everything he knows...
 
A little article on function name resolution in stack traces, from the perspective of hosted and unhosted applications.
Function Name Resolution in Stack Traces. 20 May 2016. Lately I've been writing an OS for fun. One of the first things I wanted was a decent stack trace routine which would help debugging any kernel panics and bugs. Writing a stack tracer is very simple and requires only a basic understanding of ...
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Reade and I took one last trip out to K Country to ski Purple Knob.

Surprisingly, there was still snow up to the road - so we could ski most of the way , taking our skis off only for the creek crossing.

The "crux" of the trip was boot packing up Purple Knob. We elected to climb up near a rib of rocks - but that turned out to be a poor decision as the scree near the rocks was super slippery and we could not get a boot to hold on it.

After some backtracking (humping back down the rock ridge on my rear end - and putting a small tear in my new goretex) we made our way over to deeper snow - which turned out to be much easier.

The descent was surprisingly good for April. A few inches of soft snow that held an edge.
It was noon at the summit, and heating up very quickly, so we elected for an early return to avoid any solar triggered wet avalanches.

A great season ender!


6 new photos · Album by Warren Strange
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I'll have an extra helping of butter please
 
There's a good chance you still harbor suspicion of fat, saturated or otherwise. And there's also a good chance your doctor is still giving you the advice that you should minimize your intake of the stuff. If your doctor's telling you this, then they're not a little bit off -- they're flat-out wrong, the evidence is overwhelming at this point, and was actually pretty strong even before the "fat hypothesis" took over in the 50s and 60s. This article does a good job explaining how that came to pass, and was driven by one of the well-known failure modes of the scientific process -- specifically, deference to authority, and to the strong-willed-but-wrong.

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/07/the-sugar-conspiracy-robert-lustig-john-yudkin

"[...] the science writer Gary Taubes has assembled a critique of contemporary nutrition science, powerful enough to compel the field to listen. One of his contributions has been to uncover a body of research conducted by German and Austrian scientists before the second world war, which had been overlooked by the Americans who reinvented the field in the 1950s. The Europeans were practising physicians and experts in the metabolic system. The Americans were more likely to be epidemiologists, labouring in relative ignorance of biochemistry and endocrinology (the study of hormones). This led to some of the foundational mistakes of modern nutrition." [emphasis mine]

This, for me, is the most damning part. Loose correlations from shoddy epidemiological studies are the bane of health science. Epidemiology has an often-deserved reputation for being only a step up from reading tea leaves. Such studies should be used to support or refute an underlying hypothesis, but taken as truth on their own, they're more likely to obscure than illuminate.

Imagine if we tried to do physics or chemistry with only correlation studies, underlying theory be damned? That's obvious nonsense, yet largely representative of how we study health and nutrition.
The long read: In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long?
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Identity Management geek
Employment
  • ForgeRock
    Identity Management geek, 2013 - present
  • Oracle
    Identity Management geek, 2010 - 2013
  • Sun Microsystems
    Identity Management geek, 1999 - 2010
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Calgary, Alberta. Cabarete, DR
Previously
Kelowna - Vancouver, BC - Toronto Ontario - Cabarete, Domincan Republic
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Identity Management geek living in the Great White North
Education
  • SFU
    Digital Systems Design
  • Athabasca U
    M.Sc. - Information Systems
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its OK but we expected more information
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