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Warren Ellis
14,099 followers -
Private account for Warren Ellis, friends & fellow-travellers only
Private account for Warren Ellis, friends & fellow-travellers only

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"Thomas Pynchon’s AGAINST THE DAY is a book that is almost impossible to finish.  In many ways, it defeats the point of finishing it.  It’s more than a thousand pages long, and each individual scene is pretty much the size of a novella.  It’s a novel that you can dip into like an encyclopedia.  It’s set between 1893 and World War I, and it came out in 2006.  It’s in no way current.  But I’m sitting down and writing this because it’s about everything.  It might even be the defining novel of the 21st Century..."

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Kennedy app.
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"There’s a certain kind of cookbook that you — or at least I — can read like it’s fiction. Science fiction, even. I was talking with Janice Wang, a researcher at MIT Media Lab, about this at South By the other day. (That was a really interesting visit, by the way.) She was trying to put together a thing about food in science fiction, and having a little trouble finding too much about food culture in sf. And all I could think of was the three cookbooks I’d gotten recently, written by chefs from NOMA. NOMA is a Nordic restaurant dedicated to reinventing hyperlocal, firmly seasonal foodstuffs with Science. And science is still the best poetic fiction there is..."

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Say hello.

“I would say that one of the ethical problems we face today is how to return to silence. And one of the semiotic problems we might consider is the closer study of the function of silence in various aspects of communication, to examine a semiotics of silence: it may be a semiotics of reticence, a semiotics of silence in theater, a semiotics of silence in politics, a semiotics of silence in political debate—in other words, the long pause, silence as creation of suspense, silence as threat, silence as agreement, silence as denial, silence in music.”

-- Umberto Eco, “Inventing The Enemy.”

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As read by +Wil Wheaton !

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I am moving my public act to a G+ Page.  Please circle me there.  This page will be read-only/ just talking to friends.  The Page will be where Things Happen.  We hope.

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