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WIRED hung out with 1 person. <a class='ot-hashtag' href='https://plus.google.com/s/%23hangoutsonair'>#hangoutsonair</a>Mathew Honan
Mat Honan Q&A Hang Out On Air
WIRED and 1 other participated
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25 comments
 
can you ask him how he feels about apple now after this hack? and it was internal access but how safe if the millions of credit card database at itunes?
 
While watching, is the best way to chat/listen/respond by commenting here?
 
+WIRED  2-Step Auth is a great idea, but it is painful to use it on each device for each app for each type of accounts, don't we need a completely fresh system for cloud security involving 2-Step auth but for any account on any device? Something to simplify the process, imagine if 2-Step Auth would become mandatory on any web-based service, it would be hell! 
 
#1 way to protect yourself: always make all of your passwords 12345 OR "password"  
 
Do you think cloud backups are safe enough? I use Crashplan to backup 300GB of data but don't keep everything on an external hard drive. Is that enough?
 
+Jimmy Daly I'd do both. Crashplan lets you do local backups too; that way if Crashplan goes out of business or their storage goes offline, you still have your local backup. And if your house burns down, you still have Crashplan. You really should have both on- and off-site backup for anything you really need to keep.
 
He's right, the best is to get multi save points, personally I have my datas on Dropbox, Drive, Skydrive, my PC and an external hardrive on which I save my files every months, this is the only way to never lose everything because there is no damn way to have all those systems to crash at the same time ^^
 
There's no such thing as perfect security. In the end it's a cost-benefit analysis, and right now most people given the choice will pick convenience over strong security. Is this dumb, or is it just rational economics? Planning for the worst case is only worth the cost if the worst case arrives, which it almost never does.
 
didn't folks at apple helped him recover?
 
Thanks for the hangout and relaying the experience, and what we all can do to better protect ourselves.
 
Thanks for sharing! This story scared the shit outta me but it was a necessary waking call, I've been to trustful in the cloud solutions and I will keep using them but keep my eyes opened :) I am getting my HD right now for a little backup :P
 
I've had trouble w/ 2-step auth when my phone locks up and needs original G password. 
 
+Evan Hansen It's true that planning for the worst case is only worth the cost if the worst case arrives, but does that include such things as buying insurance? Sure, your earthquake insurance only pays out if your home is damaged by an earthquake, but you'll sure be glad you had it when that happens. Many people judge that the ongoing minor cost of insurance is worth it, just so they're covered in a worst-case scenario. I'd argue that two-factor authentication is covered by the same principle. The continuing ongoing (minor) hassle is worth it.
 
+Brad Reason: You've obviously watched "Spaceballs" one too many times.
 
One thing is for certain. If the Gizmodo Twitter account had not also been compromised in the process of hacking Mat's Twitter account, the overwhelming majority of us would still be unaware of the weaknesses in the Apple and Amazon user account related processes. Thanks to the hacker for revealing his techniques and to Mat for sharing his experience with the world.
 
i think that the problem is with security and encripty... people has different methods to hacks account but if you have a good encripty i think the will be like in the sky but without elements of sky, i mean they will be in the middle of nothing
 
Mat, were you surprised that the hacker(s) employed such overly complicated & risky methods solely to gain access to your Twitter account?
 
Come on... Just use 2 step verification guys. Don't rely on passwords. Even if someone takes your password you have a second factor. Simple.
 
If you ask me you are all a bunch of idiots
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