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Vincent Scheib
Works at Google
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Google Earth Day Quiz reports that I'm a.... giant squid.  I'm good with that.
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Mantis shrimp for me

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TANX: An online multiplayer tank battle game from PlayCanvas!
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Yay!
YouTube is launching an Android app for children http://theverge.com/e/7837314
YouTube will release a new app designed for kids on Monday, the Google-owned video service has confirmed to The Verge. The app — called YouTube Kids — will reportedly offer original episodes of TV...
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New web project by the creators of BLA BLA and Just a Reflektor. A walk in the woods by Vincent Morisset, Philippe Lambert, Édouard Lanctôt-Benoit & Caroline Robert (AATOAA). Produced by the NFB & France TV.
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Very interesting, love the views

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One of the most important things you learn in any job is what's actually safe and what isn't. This is true if you're fueling trucks, raising a kid, or designing spacecraft: you develop a profound intuition for which corners are completely fine to cut and which things you never even slightly mess around with. Most often, as you learn a trade, you more and more realize that things you thought were dangerous are actually safe -- which makes sense, since it's better for those who don't know to assume danger. You end up dividing things into three groups: things that really are dangerous, things that are dangerous unless you know what you're doing, and things which aren't dangerous at all.

Of course, what you really don't want is for a bunch of amateurs to then tell you how to do your job. There's the old joke about how first-time parents, when their baby drops a pacifier, will resterilize it in boiling water; second-time parents will give it a quick rinse; third-time parents will shrug, wipe it off on their shirt, and stick it back in the kid. You really wouldn't want a bunch of first-time parents (or non-parents) passing a law mandating that you sterilize everything. What you want is for less-experienced people to learn from more-experienced people.

In this context, here's an interesting new Pew survey of attitudes towards science. What I found most interesting about it is that a lot of the questions on which there were big differences between scientists' opinions and those of the general public were precisely "is this safe" questions tied to the things that scientists deal with every day. 

Most of the time, people who know the subject say that something which sounds dangerous is actually perfectly safe: eating genetically modified foods, eating foods grown with pesticides, getting vaccines, building nuclear power plants (!). Perhaps more interestingly, there are some things which the general public thinks is safe which experts say OH HELL NO GET AWAY FROM THAT SWITCH YOU LUNATIC to: allowing climate change and increasing offshore drilling being the two most notable examples. That's part of the same kind of professional eyeball: sometimes you know that something is just a giant deathtrap waiting to happen. Turns out that offshore drilling rigs are far, far more alarming to professionals than nuclear power plants: the former fail all the time, in horribly disastrous ways, while the latter are actually pretty reliable, all told.

We can talk about lots of reasons for this: for example, the media loves to make things sound really scary (because that sells newspapers), or people don't know enough about the details. But really, what's going on is simply the judgment of experience: people who work with various strange and foreign things, day-in and day-out, tend to get a pretty good feeling for what does and doesn't matter. And it's not always going to be obvious which is which: you just have to ask people who know.
The public and scientists express strikingly different views about science-related issues, yet both groups agree that K-12 STEM education in America falls behind other nations.
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Pacman on Lombard street is pretty hilarious https://www.google.com/maps/@37.8018084,-122.4207141,18z/data=!1e3
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Who watches the watchers?
Read our letter to U.S. House and Senate leadership on how our surveillance laws should be changed. Then add your name to show your support. #United4NSAReform
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Really, why is this still a thing? I have yet to hear a single decent argument in its favor. Personally, I've always suspected that it was part of some kind of conspiracy by morning people: it means that in the winter, when daylight is scarce, people awake early in the day get more daylight hours, whereas in the summer, when there's already a surplus of light, people get more of it in the evening. So every spring, we get to lose an hour of sleep, and every fall, we get to suddenly never see the sun because it's set by the time people leave work.

Seriously, why are we doing this?
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There are no real defensible arguments in favor of changing twice a year.  There are some plausible arguments about whether it would be better to be on year-round DST or year-round standard time.  I would prefer either of those situations to the current one.

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Invaders Bokeh! /ht Enne!
All Those Pretty Lights, All Those Pretty InvadersOne goal I set at the start of 2015 was to buckle down and get serious about photography. That’s how I came to learn about Bokeh, which is all about...
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Celebrating 5 years at Google, supporting richer applications and games in web browsers! :D

(image by deviantart.com:Streetster20)
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Work
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2010 - present
    Building game dev tech into Chrome.
  • Emergent Game Technologies
    2004 - 2009
    Developed Gamebryo, used in hundreds of console and PC games.
  • NDL
    2004 - 2009
    (Merged to become Emergent)
  • Studio Gigante
    2004 - 2004
    Graphics Programmer for "Wrestlemania 21" on Xbox.
  • The Collective, Inc.
    2003 - 2004
    PS2 and XBOX engineer. Games: "Wrath Unleashed", "Star Wars Episode III, The Game", "Mark Ecko's Getting Up: Contents Under Pressure".
  • Angel Studios
    2002 - 2002
    Developed game prototypes and tools. (Angel Studios became Rockstar San Diego.)
  • Max-Plank-Institut für Informatik
    2001 - 2001
    Research leading to my Eurographics 2002 paper: "Efficient Fitting and Rendering of Large Scattered Data Sets Using Subdivision Surfaces".
  • Electronic Arts
    1999 - 1999
    Special effects for "NASCAR Rumble" Playstation 1 game.
Story
Tagline
Coder of pixels, games, and platforms.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Holiday Christmas lights
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Great indoor play experience for younger kids, lots of climbing, sliding, little soccer areas and small cars.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
68 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Nice smoked meat. Great children's menu. Has a diner feel.
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
Pizza, kid friendly, clean and fun atmosphere
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Pumpkins, huge corn maze for adults or older children, smaller corn and hay mazes for little ones, pig race, pumpkin sling shot and more. It's pretty exposed, bring sun gear, and not quaint, but the activities are good.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago