Profile

Cover photo
Vincent Racaniello
Works at Columbia University
Attended Cornell University
Lives in Columbia University, NY
10,269 followers|720,040 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On the latest episode of the science show This Week in Virology, we cover two stories about the small RNA containing viruses known as picornaviruses - including poliovirus. First, an experimental poliovirus vaccine made of thermostable, empty capsids, that's non-infectious and protective in a mouse model for the disease. It's meant for the post-eradication era, but how to test any new poliovirus vaccine is a conundrum. Next, the identification of two cell genes that make up a switch that allows either productive infection or clearance of picornaviruses. The first was identified in a screen of genes needed for picornavirus replication. The second gene was identified as a suppressor of the first! How they work together is a very cool story.
1
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On this week's episode of the science show This Week in Virology, we first describe two blood tests for the chronic degenerative neurological prion disease, variant CJD. This disease is acquired by ingesting meat contaminated with the prions of mad cow disease, or alternatively, by receiving contaminated blood. Up till now there was no way to check the blood supply for these disease causing proteins. Next, a paper that uses computational biology to show that foamy retroviruses likely originated in the seas at least 450 million years ago, together with their jawed vertebrate hosts. 
2
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On this week's episode of the science show This Week in Virology, we discuss how inoculating only the capsid protein of an astrovirus into turkeys induces diarrhea. We conclude that the capsid protein alone is an enterotoxin. Next, we review the finding of a novel double-stranded RNA virus of fungi in North American bats with white nose syndrome. The virus is not found in European fungal isolates from bats, and because the disease is not found there, the suggestion is that the virus plays a role in the fungal disease.
1
Godhave Mercyonme's profile photo
 
Post will be muted, do you prefare that?
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
In the last episode for 2016 of the science show This Week in Virology, the entire team reviews compelling virology stories of the past year. Happy New Year everyone! May all your viruses be good!
1
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
Neither rain nor snow nor sleet nor Christmas days, prevents the science show TWiV from completing a new episode. Today we continue talking about infectious, non-replicating vaccines. We talk about a new chikungunya virus vaccine in which an insect-specific arbovirus is used to present the structural proteins of chik virus. The recombinant virus can be propagated in insect cells but does not replicate in mammalian cells. Immunization of mice or nonhuman primates leads to strong, protective immunity. Merry Virus everyone!
5
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On the latest episode of the science show This Week in Virology, we explain a potentially new approach to making viral vaccines. The authors of this study introduce stop codons throughout the influenza virus genome, then produce infectious viruses in cell lines that have been engineered to recognize the stop codons and insert an amino acid. The influenza viruses are harvested, and when inoculated into mice, they do not replicate - the mouse cells terminate translation when a stop codon is encountered - but a strong and protective antibody response is produced. Cool technology, although it's not clear if this vaccine would be any more effective or durable than existing ones.
2
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On the latest episode of the science show This Week in Parasitism, we solve the case of the Timber Worker with Severe Shaking Chills - most of you got this one right! We move on to an interesting paper that describes an experimental malaria vaccine comprising attenuated sporozoites produced by genetic engineering. The only problem is that is has to be delivered by mosquitoes - you put your arm in a cage to be bitten by up to 200 of them! Interesting approach but not scalable.
1
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On the latest episode of the science show This Week in Microbiology, we reveal how applying electric current to a biofilm of bacteria - normally highly resistant to antibiotics - vastly improves their sensitivity to the drug. It works through the generation of peroxides. Shocking! Then we move on to bacteriophage, and a story about how a virus-resistant cell can give its virus-resistant neighbors the receptors needed for infection. Receptor transfer happens through small membranous vesicles shed by the cells and taken up by others.
4
Godhave Mercyonme's profile photo
 
You
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On the latest episode (in fact the first for 2017) of the science show This Week in Parasitism, we solve the case of the Global Health Intern with a snakelike lesion on her foot (sounds easy, right? Serpiginous?). Then we talk about a paper showing that what looks like a DNA binding protein of Trypanosoma cruzi does not bind DNA, but is needed for differentiation of this parasite.

The title is pronounced 'Rapping with the tryps'. RPA is the ssDNA binding protein and....well you can blame Dickson, he's simply not up to Alan Dove's standards.
1
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On the last episode for 2016 of the science show This Week in Microbiology, we have two stories for you. First, a group of antifungal compounds, the phenylpyrroles, which have been extensively used in crop protection, but against which little resistance has emerged - in the field. In the laboratory, resistance is easy to obtain. Our second story concerns a protein complex in Bacillus subtilis that can measure thickness of membranes - down to angstroms! This caliper is used to detect temperature, as membrane thickness changes with that parameter.
1
2
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On this month's episode of the science show This Week in Evolution, Vincent travels to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City to record at the Microbial Pathogenesis retreat. He and Nels speak with five faculty members about their work on viruses, bacteria, fungi, and mirror-image biochemistry. Recorded in the Natural History Museum of Utah, right on the UoU campus. With video. 
University of Utah School of Medicine faculty members talk about their work on bacteria, fungi, viruses, and mirror-image biochemistry.
1
Add a comment...

Vincent Racaniello

Shared publicly  - 
 
On the latest episode of the science show This Week in Parasitism, we solve the case of the Dutch Woman with White Worms in Her Stool. Then we cover a study indicating that adhesion of malaria-infected red blood cells to host cells occurs via a complement receptor, and might cause more severe disease. Finally Dickson introduces a new feature, Parasitology Heroes, in which he briefly profiles important people in the field.
1
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
Professor, virus guru, science podcaster and blogger
Introduction
I'm Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Columbia University in New York. I run a research lab where we study poliovirus, rhinovirus, and other RNA viruses. I also love teaching about viruses - check out virology.ws, twiv.tv, or iTunes University for some of my offerings. I want to be the world's virology professor.
Bragging rights
Produced first infectious DNA clone of an animal virus
Education
  • Cornell University
  • Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
January 2
Other names
profvrr
Work
Occupation
Professor
Employment
  • Columbia University
    Professor, present
  • MIT
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Columbia University, NY
Previously
Paterson, NJ - Scotch Plains, NJ - Ithaca, NY - New York, NY - Boston, MA - Upper Saddle River, NJ