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Vicky Veritas
Attended University of California, Santa Cruz
Lives in Silicon Valley, California
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Vicky Veritas

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Tahlequah, Oklahoma - Stop 141: Wilma Mankiller

In 1838, President Andrew Jackson had the Cherokee Nation rounded up and forcibly marched on the "Trail of Tears" to Indian Territory in Oklahoma under a law called the Indian Removal Act. Conditions were cruel, and an estimated 4,000 died from hunger, exposure, abuse and disease. One who survived was the great-grandfather of Wilma Mankiller born in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, the capital of the Cherokee Nation, on November 18, 1945.

Relocated in 1956, Wilma Mankiller spent much of her younger life in the San Francisco Bay Area where she was plunged into the civil and social movements of the late sixties, especially the movement to bring recognition to the mistreatment of Native Americans. In 1969, she and other activists occupied Alcatraz Island, a historic event that awakened her pride in her heritage and her passion and commitment to better the lives of her people.

In 1976, Wilma Mankiller moved back to Oklahoma for good. She began an entry-level job for the Cherokee Nation and became active in the community and a fierce advocate for improved health care, government and education; an advocate the Cherokee community needed desperately. 

In the early eighties, the rural area occupied by the Cherokee community of Bell was impoverished and the people demoralized by generations of dispossession and dehumanization. Many of the ramshackle homes lacked running water and the government did nothing to help better their plight. Led by Wilma Mankiller and her future husband, Charlie Soap, they inspired and empowered the community to take charge of their own future. Together with a community of volunteers they built 16 miles of water pipeline to bring the bounty of fresh water to Bell.

The successful completion of the waterline led to Wilma’s election as the first woman Chief of the Cherokee Nation, which she proudly served from 1985 to 1995, and sparked a movement of similar self-help projects across the Cherokee nation and in Indian country that continues to this day. During her tenure, the Cherokee Nation tripled in population, employment doubled, and the communities rallied and thrived. She explains her example to the Cherokee youth, and especially the girls thusly, "Prior to my election," says Mankiller, "young Cherokee girls would never have thought that they might grow up and become chief."

Wilma Mankiller died in 2010 from pancreatic cancer at age 64. During her lifetime she became an author, a respected leader, and a feminist. She was awarded a Presidential Medal of Freedom by Bill Clinton in 1998 and was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1993. She is immortalized in film and the subject of numerous books and articles. Stop 141 had to be dedicated to this hero.

We are better people and a stronger tribal nation because of her example of Cherokee leadership, statesmanship, humility, grace, determination and decisiveness... Her gift to us is the lesson that our lives and future are for us to decide. We can carry on that Cherokee legacy by teaching our children that lesson.
~ Chad Smith, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation after Wilma Mankiller 

Wilma Mankiller became the best kind of leader: one who creates independence, not dependence; who helps people go back to a collective broken place and begin to heal themselves. Though there is a long way to go before the Cherokee Nation restores in a new form the dignity and self-sufficiency it knew 500 years ago, before the terrible centuries of genocide and the banning of even the Cherokee language and religion, now there is a way of making progress that is their own.
~ Gloria Steinem, Revolution from Within, 1992 on her close friend and collaborator, Wilma Mankiller, legacy to the Cherokee Nation

Read more on Wilma Mankiller here: http://cojmc.unl.edu/nativedaughters2/?nd_profile=wilma-mankiller and here:http://www.notablebiographies.com/Lo-Ma/Mankiller-Wilma.html#ixzz3esZojHa6 

This post is inspired by the 1886 children's geographic game, Rambles Through Our Country. By the time the game was published in 1886, the once-proud Cherokee people were a decimated and conquered nation. Forced to move from place to place to give up land the government found attractive, they finally settled in Oklahoma. 

The RTOC game involves a gameboard, a book or key to the stops, and some kind of spinner. Find the gameboard here: http://goo.gl/7ORK1E  and the book here: https://goo.gl/u96JE3 To spin, use the random number generator at: https://www.random.org/ and set the maximum number to 4.

I rolled a 3 on the makeshift  teetotum and moved from The Colorado River - Stop 138: The Colorado River Delta to Tahlequah, Oklahoma - Stop 141: Wilma Mankiller. Reading the book that goes with RTOC, was uninspiring: "Tahlequah: Is the capital of this Territory and the seat of government of the Cherokees, where they have their council lodge. It is an average southwestern town, and has nothing special about it to indicate its Indian origin save its population." Pfffft. I hope you find Wilma Mankiller as inspiring as I do.

#ramblesthroughourcountry   #tahlequahoklahoma   #wilmamankiller  
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Dune Endures

This fascinating piece by the Guardian looks back on the legacy and impact of the science fiction novel, Dune. In an age of global warming, a worldwide water shortage, and continued political upheaval in Middle East, Dune may be as relevant now as it was fifty years ago.

Thank you, +Ethan M.​ and +Cheryl Martin​ 
 
An interesting piece on Dune.  Longtime fans might even learn something from this.
It has sold millions of copies, is perhaps the greatest novel in the science-fiction canon and Star Wars wouldn’t have existed without it. Frank Herbert’s Dune should endure as a politically relevant fantasy from the Age of Aquarius
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Mapping the Most Expensive Paintings Sold by Country

These unusual maps by HowMuch.net look at the most expensive art transactions by country. And while it seems a trivial mapping exercise it actually speaks volumes about art style and artist preferences, and the distribution of wealth and the wealthiest nations. There are lots of questions about the underlying data and methodologies, but it is worth sharing for the aesthetic value alone.

Also see: http://hyperallergic.com/219294/mapping-the-most-expensive-artworks-sold-by-country/
The World´s Most Expensive Paintings: Discover the cost of the most amazing paintings in the globe.
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Good insight and a fascinating look at how art passes hands. Thank you, +Steve Troman 
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I love this article written by +Los Angeles Public Library​​ map librarian +glen creason​​ highlighting this great 1936 map of the many flags that have flown on California soil. One fun thing I learned is that San Jose served as the capitol of California in 1850 when it first gained statehood. Wikipedia concurs and give more great history: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Jose,_California

Thank you, +glen creason​​!
Argentinians, Russians, Spaniards, and Mexicans all claimed land along the Pacific Coast before it became a part of the United States
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The flag went through a lot of changes in a relatively short period of time: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_the_United_States  I am not quite sure how to correlate the map to what wikipedia shows though, +Rudy de Groot!
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90% of them are underwater. Find the rest of them here: http://www.icebergfinder.com/
Here's where to find every iceberg in Newfoundland and Labrador right now.
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:smh: +Timothy Street :-)
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+Mattias Adolfsson sees the world through the keen eyes of a master artist and illustrator. Let him take you on a magical mystery tour to the intricate, witty and detailed world of "All Together Now," his tribute to the Beatles and see just how many Beatles references you can find.

Be sure to explore more of Mattias' works here: http://mattiasa.blogspot.com/ and don't forget to circle him to keep up with his latest posts.
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Not sure how I missed them, +Vicky Veritas
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The arc of the story takes a magmatic turn as we continue our drive through "The Most Dangerous Plate Boundary in the World." Today we visit Mt. Shasta with our favorite Geotripper, +Garry Hayes, and learn more about the violent past of one of the biggest stratovolcanoes in the world.

Thank you, +Garry Hayes!
 
Gigantic catastrophic mudflows and six-foot-long salmon...with fangs! Fishing would have been a unique experience in the Sierra Nevada 5 million years ago...
Mt. Shasta is a big mountain. A really big mountain. Reaching an elevation of 14,179 ft (4,322 m), and rising nearly 10,000 ft. (~3,000 m) above the surrounding terrain, it has a volume of around 100 cubic miles. As such, it ...
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(Deleted comment, thought I dropped it in Mr. Hayes' post.)
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Shiny.

Thank you, +Mattias Adolfsson 
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"profile and photo spheres will be presented alongside those from Google and other contributors, creating a unified Street View gallery designed to bring more visibility to you and your work."

Thank you, +Google Maps 
 
"What, do you think you're the center of the universe or something?" goo.gl/hxQK0z
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You are very welcome, +Michael Galli!
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Heavy laden with sadness and symbolism, Retrograde seems to examine a wish that we could go backward in time and undo that moment when we lost someone we loved. Thank you +Rose Ahmad
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No one can tell what goes on in between the person you were and the person you become. No one can chart that blue and lonely section of hell. There are no maps of the change. You just come out the other side.

Or you don't.
~ Stephen King, The Stand

For all its faults, The Stand still does.
I was twelve the first time I read Stephen King’s The Stand. My dad read it before I did. We were on vacation, and I saw him with the paperback, the edition with the silver binding and blue-black cover. There was a face on the cover—a mysterious, spooky sort of face, creepy and weirdly beautiful. I saw that face, and it worried at me, the way grown-up things always worried me back then. The sort of worry that’s like an itch you can’t help scratch...
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And don't forget Randall Flagg, +Anne Anderson :-) Yes, the beam ties the majority of King's novels together.
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Journey into the heart of the sun to learn about solar storms that can threaten the world's power and technological infrastructure in this documentary narrated by Benedict Cumberpatch. The full 24 minute video, Solar Superstorms, will be shown at planetariums and science centers.

Thank you, +Kristan Uccello!
 
The actor narrates an awesome documentary about solar storms that could take out Earth’s technology
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With all the sun that shines in Orlando, I hope the video shows there, +The Cloberth! You are welcome!
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Senior Geosystems Specialist
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Silicon Valley, California
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Roseville, California - Anchorage, Alaska - Oroville, California
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Saving the world, one map at a time.
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Senior Geosystems Specialist
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I map sewer lines
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  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    Earth Science, 2000
  • San José State University
    Earth Science, 1996
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