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More Than Vacuums - Littleton AKA Centennial TV Vac Sew More
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More Than Vacuums - Littleton AKA Centennial TV Vac Sew More's posts

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Since 1981, our family has been operating in Colorado. We repair and service all makes and models of vacuum cleaners such as Hoover, Royal, Dirt Devil, Eureka, Bissell, Kenmore, Panasonic, Dyson, Miele, Sebo, Simplicity, Riccar, Windsor, Sanitaire, Electrolux, Shark, Oreck, including vacuum cleaners you bought from door-to-door sales person like a Kirby, Tri-Star, Filter Queen, Rainbow, Silver King and more...

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Miele Vacuums and Appliances are the Best for the healthy clean homes of today!
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Come join us at the Colorado home and Garden show this weekend!!!
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Denver metros only authorized kitchen aid dealer and repair service center!!! Call 303-794-8037
Use your KitchenAid® Food Processor Attachment for your Stand Mixer to shred colorful veggies for these rainbow latkes from What Jew Wanna Eat: http://kitchen.ai/FywP5

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Air Quality News from IQAir, the world leader in air purifiers.

Come to IQ Airs preferred Denver dealer for all your air purification needs and replacement filters.

Scented candles are a popular way to create a pleasant ambiance at home. Scents such as lavender, jasmine and sandalwood can be relaxing and invigorating. And during the holidays, many people find the warm glow and aroma of pine, gingerbread or cinnamon makes a room more festive. Unfortunately, most mass-produced scented candles can have a negative impact on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). From the wax to the wick to the fragrance itself, the average scented candle can release harmful chemicals into the air — even when unlit. So while you and your family enjoy the fragrance of scented candles in your home, they may be damaging your health.

Paraffin wax
Most candles are made from paraffin, a petroleum byproduct. To create paraffin, petroleum waste is chemically bleached, deodorized and made into wax. When burned, paraffin wax can release toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air including acetone, benzene and toluene, which are known carcinogens. These are the same chemicals found in diesel fuel emissions and are known to cause allergies, asthma attacks and skin problems. A study by the University of South Florida showed that candles made of paraffin wax emit low levels of benzene even when they are not lit.

In addition to releasing toxic chemicals, burning paraffin wax produces soot with particles that can remain suspended in the air for hours. The University of South Florida study showed that these ultrafine soot particles are similar to diesel exhaust in both their size and composition. They penetrate deeply into the lungs and are absorbed into the blood stream. Ultrafine particles are associated with allergies, asthma and other respiratory diseases, as well as heart attacks, strokes and even cancer. And a study by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency showed that soot emissions from candles containing fragrances are significantly higher than those from non-scented candles.

Chemical fragrances
Another problem with scented candles is that the chemicals they use to create a pleasing aroma are generally far from wholesome. Most scented candles use synthetic fragrances and dyes that give off dangerous VOCs even at room temperature. Commonly emitted VOCs related to the scent in candles include formaldehyde, petroleum distillates, limonene, alcohol and esters. These harmful chemicals can cause health problems ranging from headaches, dizziness and allergy symptoms to asthma attacks, respiratory tract infections and even cancer.

Cored wicks
Many candles have cored wicks made from cotton that is wrapped around a metal support. The design helps keep the wick from falling over into the wax. This is especially useful for scented candles, because the fragrance oils soften the wax and allow non-cored wicks to go limp.

In the past, lead was commonly used in cored candlewicks — especially in candles imported from overseas. However, after determining that these wicks could present a lead poisoning hazard to young children, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission banned the manufacture and sale of all candles with lead-core wicks in 2003. Now, zinc and tin are generally used instead. However, all metal-core wicks release trace amounts of heavy metals into the air when they are burned. And wicks with zinc and tin cores can still release small amounts of lead particles.

Safer alternatives
If you still crave the pleasant ambiance and aroma of scented candles, don’t despair. There are safer ways to scent the air. Here are some suggestions:

Use essential oils for fragrance. Essential oils can be placed in a diffuser or in bathwater to create a wonderful aroma.
Simmer spices. Place spices such as cinnamon sticks, cloves and nutmeg in a pot of water and let it simmer on the stove.
Create potpourri. Dried items such as flowers, berries, fruit rinds, wood chips and spices can be placed in bowls or fabric bags and placed around your home.
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Miele stick vacuums are a great lightweight and powerful solution
Full demo & review of the Miele S164 stick vacuum cleaner.
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