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U.S. Studies Online
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Forum for New Writing in American Studies
Forum for New Writing in American Studies

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On Tuesday 27th June 2017, U.S. Studies Online hosted a #bookhour on Ben Lerner’s ‘Leaving the Atocha Station’ (2011). The novel focuses on Adam Gordon, a poet in his mid-twenties completing a fellowship in Madrid. While his aim is to write poetry, he…

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In recent years Brooklyn has become trendy. Young professionals have rushed to buy homes in neighbourhoods like Park Slope and Red Hook, while budding artists, writers, and musicians have flocked to Williamsburg and Green Point. Even those not looking to…

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'One of the particular successes of this event, one which was international and multi-lingual, was it's inclusion of one-to-one advice. This pre-conference event fit perfectly with the title, and the implicit theme of ‘collaboration’, as it offered junior scholars a chance to speak and participate in a comfortable environment, positioning traditionally confrontational—and masculinist—academic exchange as outmoded.' Krista E. Roberts reviews 'Lives Outside the Lines: Gender and Genre in the Americas', held at York University, Toronto, 15-17 May 2017

This summer’s biennial meeting of the IABA Chapter of the Americas, convened by Ricia Anne Chansky (University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez) and Eva Karpinski (York University), brought lives and work into the lines while honoring the life and work of…

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'Reflecting the present tumultuous environment of US domestic and foreign policy, HOTCUS 2017 addressed a range of robust themes rather than a solitary one.' Matthew O'Brien reviews the HOTCUS Annual Conference, University College Dublin,16-18 June 2017

The tenth annual meeting of Historians of the Twentieth Century United States (HOTCUS) took place in an uncharacteristically balmy Dublin, hosted by University College Dublin situated in the fair city’s south side. The event attracted delegates from…

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The end of postmodernism? Jesús Bolaño Quintero explores David Foster Wallace's writing, searching for a new form of honesty in American literature after the age of irony.

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Winner of last year's USSO Keynote competition, Dr Hannah Murray, reflects on her keynote 'Blackface Like Me: The Borders of Belonging and Desires for Blackness in America'.

The competition posed a welcome challenge disseminating my research for different audiences. It encouraged me to write for an audience that, whilst sharing a broad base of knowledge, are not experts in my specific field of nineteenth-century literature.…

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Historical amnesia has created the impression that the reconstruction of Germany and Japan along liberal capitalist lines was a foregone conclusion in 1945. In reality, however, the decision to occupy was a contested question for both Washington’s…

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Mary Jean Chan reviews the recent 'Special Relationships: Poetry Across the Atlantic Since 2000' symposium, held at the Rothermere American Institute at the University of Oxford on 19 May 2017

The one-day symposium held at the Rothermere American Institute (RAI) at the University of Oxford on ‘Poetry Across the Atlantic Since 2000’ featured an arresting array of speakers from both sides of the Atlantic. Ultimately, the conference served to…

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In his article ‘Anglo-American Isolationism: The Case for New Archetypes’ Dr Stephen Bowman reflects on how Anglo-American elites sought to manage UK-US discord at a time of heightened American nationalism in the 1920s.

Edward Luce recently wrote an article for the New York Times in which he argued that the ‘farce’ made of British governance by the current crop of Tory politicians is indicative of the parochial outlook of ‘post-internationalist’ Britain’s ruling elites.…

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Sharon Betts reviews 'Hardboiled History: A Noir Lens on America's Past', University of Warwick, 19 May 2017.

‘Hardboiled’ refers to crime fiction, narratives usually focalised through tough or cynical detectives and centring primarily on organised crime in prohibition-era United States. The genre of noir, however, categorises fiction that takes the perspective…
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