Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
Urs Hölzle
Works at Google
Attended Stanford University
Lives in Palo Alto, CA
26,637 followers|12,219,825 views
AboutPostsPhotos
People
Have him in circles
26,637 people
Ben Williams (Bendrix)'s profile photo
Kuldeep Sharma's profile photo
Chris Kern's profile photo
jhumer gupta's profile photo
david tuktuk's profile photo
Saeed Ullah's profile photo
Malte Jäger's profile photo
Roberto Micozzi's profile photo
Wayne Montague's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Technical Infrastructure @ Google
Employment
  • Google
    SVP Technical Infrastructure, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Palo Alto, CA
Previously
Santa Barbara, CA - Zurich, Switzerland
Story
Tagline
My other computer is a data center
Education
  • Stanford University
    CS, 1988 - 1994
  • ETH Zurich
    CS, 1983 - 1988
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Other names
Urs Hoelzle

Stream

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Another brilliant episode about an important topic. If you don't have 15 minutes watch the "updated" AOL commercial at the end starting about 13:50. (The original one appears earlier in the segment.)
161
27
Bernhard Pichler's profile photoGustavo Alvarado's profile photoCristian Petrescu-Prahova's profile photoAparna Brown's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Yash Trivedi​ I think you may not have noticed today it was the uploader who hasn't allowed access to the video in certain parts of the world.
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Great article on the FIFA affair.  Key thesis: "FIFA’s phenomenal success (or failure, depending on perspective), has little to do with Blatter and more to do with three robust pedestals propping up FIFA’s architecture. FIFA is a monopoly; soccer enjoys vast popularity among an insatiable population of consumers; and FIFA’s governance is ideally suited to encourage—or at least tolerate—illicit favors in exchange for loyalty."
Corruption charges against leading FIFA officials demonstrate the power held by a monopolistic, cash-fueled organizer of the world's favorite sport. 
51
6
Rajeev Sivaram's profile photoMarius CC's profile photoTau-Mu Yi's profile photoRicardo Blanco (Mr. White)'s profile photo
3 comments
 
If it is the only truth that says ONE-ROTTEN-POTATO SPOILS the whole pack, whoever is found to be that rotten-potato must be dealt with in a good way. LET US DO AWAY WITH CORRUPTION !!
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Help! Our AIs are taking hallucinogenic drugs....

Actually, it illustrates how "shallow" these deep networks still are, despite their remarkable performance. E.g., small children recognize pretty easily that a dumbbell is separate from the arm/hand carrying it, even if they never see one just by itself.  But neural nets don't appear to be capable of such abstraction (if that's the right word --I'm no expert).
309
40
David Metcalfe's profile photoNirmal Jayasinghe's profile photoΑλέξης Darrasse's profile photoEugene Ho's profile photo
46 comments
iDreams
 
following Capitan Twice 
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
13 balloon designs in 24 months qualifies for "rapid iteration", I think :-). Although still pretty far from a production system, it's amazing how far the team has come in creating something that actually might work one day. Two years ago it was just a crazy idea...congratulations, +Project Loon​!
 
Today, Project Loon turns two! It’s been quite a journey—16 million kilometers to be precise—since we first connected sheep farmer Charles Nimmo to the Internet during our 2013 pilot test.

Our earliest tests started back in 2011, using a weather balloon and basic, off-the-shelf radio parts. These tests showed that balloon-powered Internet might just work, but the team knew that weather balloons wouldn't be a long term solution since they aren’t built to last in the stratosphere. So, our balloon enthusiasts got down to work and asked: if we wanted to bring balloon powered Internet to the whole world, what type of balloon would we need to build?

We started by building much, much bigger balloons able to hold equipment capable of beaming connectivity 20 km down to the earth below—starting with our modestly larger early Albatross design, all the way up to our 141-foot-long Hawk and beyond. To ensure there’s always a balloon overhead to provide connection, we needed to build a system that can manufacture these balloons at scale, leading to our latest balloon design, the Nighthawk, the likes of which has never been seen before.

Take a peek into our archives to see how our balloons have developed over time to deal with these challenges, from our very first ‘prehistoric’ balloons all the way to our latest flock design.
20 comments on original post
149
12
Andrew Cooks's profile photoJason Morrison's profile photoKa Hung Hui's profile photoRoger Frigola's profile photo
4 comments
Steve S
+
1
2
1
 
+Ethan Anderson Why not hydrogen?
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Cool Chrome extension that shows you a new piece of art every time you open a new tab.
Art Project masterpieces from Google Cultural Institute in your browser tabs
159
42
Marshall Grande's profile photoRyan Burgess's profile photoDarren Neimke's profile photoian bennett's profile photo
4 comments
 
You might also like Momentum which shoes you a beautiful, peaceful scene.
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Be notified that I have copyrighted the following API:

void print();

However, I will grant a non-exclusive, non-transferrable, perpetual license to this Work at the low, low price of $1 per call site. Call now while supplies last!
 
White House: Yeah, copyright those APIs.
Google v. Oracle: Unlicensed use of APIs might be a fair use, US says.
19 comments on original post
245
17
Daniel Dumitriu's profile photoPaul Hahn's profile photoTravis Casper's profile photodhritiman borkakoti's profile photo
27 comments
 
+Rich Martin Maybe you are right, companies should really be using the "honour" system.

If you use someone else's stuff, you should be happy to pay them for it. It is the ethical and honourable thing to do.

Finding loopholes by making just the compiled byte-code different so you can get around being caught is an absolute indicator that you agree that you are ripping off someone else's efforts without having to invest any of the money that they initially did.

I just don't get it. G has the cash, just pay for Java. The side-effect of a precedence like this could be damaging to everyone else in the industry. As Rich says, it will really muddy the water if defined generally.
In G's case with Android, it appears an obvious theft on the surface.

What would your mom say?
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
26,637 people
Ben Williams (Bendrix)'s profile photo
Kuldeep Sharma's profile photo
Chris Kern's profile photo
jhumer gupta's profile photo
david tuktuk's profile photo
Saeed Ullah's profile photo
Malte Jäger's profile photo
Roberto Micozzi's profile photo
Wayne Montague's profile photo

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nice idea to improve the signal to noise ratio in fiber.  Too bad it's just in the experimental stages -- they still need to figure out how to make it cost effective.
A group of electrical engineers says that sending information in a new fashion could, in theory, double the capacity of fiber-optic circuits.
77
14
Mark Bridge's profile photoPeter Vettraino's profile photoChristoph Isch's profile photoAnusha Iyer's profile photo
10 comments
 
This technique is a much (MUCH) faster version of a long-used geophysical technique that makes seismic reflection images more clear. Shaker trucks inject a signal into the earth that has a distinctive wave form. When the signal is received and processed, the wave form is removed to collapse the returning signal back to a more coherent representation of the reflection than would otherwise be possible. This is called "convolution/deconvolution".
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Last week the FASTER cable, a new transpacific network link with a theoretical peak capacity of 60 Tbps (that's 60 million megabits), landed in Japan.  FASTER is a joint project between Google and several ISPs to provide, well, faster Internet speeds between the two regions.  The album (with pictures courtesy of http://gigazine.net/news/20150615-kddi-faster/) give you a quick overview of how such a cable is installed.

PS: see how this was done in 1956 for TAT-1, the first modern transatlantic telephone cable (with capacity for 36 phone calls, or about 0.2 megabits): http://atlantic-cable.com/Cables/1956TAT-1/index.htm.
345
78
Francesco Sorrentino's profile photoMatteo De Carlo's profile photoSigfredo Zamorano's profile photoSean McMahon's profile photo
18 comments
 
Thanks, Apollinaire. I am trying to reach senior execs at Google to discuss a great data center site her in the U.S.  
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Today at the Open Network Summit we showed how we've been running our datacenter networks for the past decade.  (For full details you'll have to wait for a paper we'll publish at SIGCOMM 2015 in August.)  

Great networking has long been a key ingredient in having a great cloud platform, and of course you get to use these same networks on +Google Cloud Platform. 
315
139
Marius CC's profile photoDonald King (chronos)'s profile photoDenis De Messemacker's profile photoRainer Butsch's profile photo
11 comments
 
And we've got a place we'd love to show you in Northern Nevada that would allow you to run a data center on existing geothermal power and use the sun and large volumes of water (7.2 million gallons a day) to make that smaller data center as energy efficient as anything imaginable... We're just a hop and a skip away from where you are (where I grew up!) and we think you and your team would be very impressed with all that's possible at this location.  Land, water, power, security, beauty... :0) 
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Just in case you didn't know it: walking is hard. (Some of the falls are quite funny.) 
174
49
Andreas Otz's profile photoHugo van der Merwe's profile photoKristin Ayala's profile photoLee's profile photo
15 comments
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
Probably the coolest I/O announcement today.
136
21
Andrew Dorsey's profile photoRăzvan Surdulescu's profile photoMykola Pechenizkiy's profile photoMadhu Gurnani's profile photo
8 comments
 
Oh, teleportation? If it can really take kids on a field trip anywhere, that would be awesome.

If all it does is encourage teachers to give kids more computer time in place of field trips, that's kind of lame.
Add a comment...

Urs Hölzle

Shared publicly  - 
 
It's shockingly easy to get worldwide attention with a totally bogus study. Simple recipe: measure 20 variables in a small sample group, and it's likely that one of them will "win the lottery" and seem statistically significant. Nice job demonstrating this.
“Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. It made the front page of Bild, Europe’s largest daily newspaper, just beneath their update about the Germanwings crash. From there, it ricocheted around the internet and beyond, making news in more than 20 countries and half a dozen languages. It was discussed on tel...
128
43
Bob Lancaster's profile photoKnut A. Syed's profile photoGatis Špats's profile photosubhashini venugopalan's profile photo
4 comments
 
Gonna buy chocolate.
Add a comment...