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UrbanDegeneration - Urban Exploration
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Exploring forgotten places.
Exploring forgotten places.

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The Sedlec Ossuary is a small Roman Catholic chapel, located beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints in Sedlec, a suburb of Kutná Hora in the Czech Republic. It is one of twelve World Heritage Sites in the Czech Republic. The ossuary is estimated to contain the skeletons of between 40,000 and 70,000 people, whose bones have, in many cases, been artistically arranged to form decorations and furnishings for the chapel.

In 1278, Henry, the abbot of the Cistercian monastery in Sedlec, was sent to the Holy Land by King Otakar II of Bohemia. He returned with him a small amount of earth he had removed from Golgotha and sprinkled it over the abbey cemetery. The word of this pious act soon spread and the cemetery in Sedlec became a desirable burial site throughout Central Europe.

In the mid 14th century, during the Black Death, and after the Hussite Wars in the early 15th century, many thousands were buried in the abbey cemetery, so it had to be greatly enlarged.

Around 1400, a Gothic church was built in the center of the cemetery with a vaulted upper level and a lower chapel to be used as an ossuary for the mass graves unearthed during construction, or simply slated for demolition to make room for new burials.

After 1511, the task of exhuming skeletons and stacking their bones in the chapel was given to a half-blind monk of the order.

Between 1703 and 1710, a new entrance was constructed to support the front wall, which was leaning outward, and the upper chapel was rebuilt. This work, in the Czech Baroque style, was designed by Jan Santini Aichel.

In 1870, František Rint, a woodcarver, was employed by the Schwarzenberg family to put the bone heaps into order, yielding a macabre result.

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Jánské Koupele spa was founded around 1810 by Jan of Tenczina who left with the three ancient mineral springs and built the first spa house. Over the years it added more pavilions as baths were becoming increasingly popular. Their popularity has helped romantic location in the valley of the river Moravice surrounded by forests and clean air rich in ozone.

The greatest flowering of experienced spa in the early 20th century, when it was owned genus Razumovských. Count Camillo Razumovsky had to modify existing sources (Paul, John and Forest), he refurbished all the buildings and built a villa for families (Ruzena and Elisabeth). In 1897 he built a new source of the river Moravice and Marie grew up a new bath house (today's pension Paul).

The park was covered colonnade and the 50th anniversary of the reign of Emperor Franz Joseph I. Razumovští established for poor people who needed spa treatment, a new villa Silesia. The facility was set up courts for cricket, tennis and swimming. In the vicinity of the spa were many promenades and walking sidewalks with benches and resting places.

The spa had around 120 rooms with about 200 beds and was used to treat disorders such as heart disease, neurasthenia, rheumatism, insomnia and metabolic disorders.

1940 was the last ever spa season. It then became part of the Sudeten Germans organisation and a training center for the Hitler Youth was set up during the war, along side a prison camp where they were holding seventy allied generals.

After 1945, the spa was under the Benes decrees nationalized and the area was children's convalescent home and sanatorium ROH untill it's closure in 1994.

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Crown Theatre, Eccles
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Altrincham General Hospital
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London Road Fire Station, Manchester
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Prudential Assurance Buildings, Oldham
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Croda Chemicals, Bromborough
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Kelvin Fenton Mill, Burnley
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Bare Street Christian Mission, Bolton
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