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Umesh Heendeniya
Worked at Phillip Morris (Altria) Inc.
Attended Virginia Commonwealth University
Lives in Spring Hill, Florida, USA.
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Umesh Heendeniya

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FBI’s stingray quickly found suspect after local cops’ device couldn’t - New court filings in US v. Ellis show the lengths that Oakland police, FBI went to, Cyrus Farivar, in Ars Technica.
New court filings in US v. Ellis show the lengths that Oakland police, FBI went to.
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Drug and Device Makers Pay Thousands of Docs with Disciplinary Records - Physicians whose state boards have sanctioned them for harming patients, unnecessarily prescribing addictive drugs, bilking federal insurance programs and even sexual misconduct nonetheless continue to receive payments for consulting, giving talks about products, and more, by Jessica Huseman, in ProPublica.
Pharmaceutical and medical device companies are continuing to pay doctors as promotional speakers and expert advisers even after they’ve been disciplined for serious misconduct, according to an analysis by ProPublica. One such company is medical device maker Stryker Corp.
In June 2015, New York’s Board for Professional Medical Conduct accused orthopedic surgeon Alexios Apazidis of improperly prescribing pain medications to 28 of his patients. The board fined him $50,000 and placed him on three years’ probation, requiring that a monitor keep an eye on his practice. Despite this, Stryker paid Apazidis more than $14,000 in consulting fees, plus travel expenses, in the last half of 2015.
Stryker also paid another orthopedic surgeon, Mohammad Diab of San Francisco, more than $16,000 for consulting and travel, even though California’s medical board had disciplined him for having a two-year-long inappropriate sexual relationship with a patient, whose two children he also treated. He was suspended from practice for 60 days, required to seek psychological treatment and given seven years’ probation. He is still required to have a third party present while seeing female patients.
ProPublica reviewed disciplinary records for doctors in five states, California, Texas, New York, Florida and New Jersey, and checked them against data released by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on company payments to doctors. That included payments for things like speaking, consulting, education, travel and gifts, but not for meals, as these often don’t reflect a formal relationship between companies and doctors. (You can look up your doctors using our Dollars for Docs tool. We’re currently working on adding 2015 data.) All told, the analysis identified at least 2,300 doctors who received industry payments between August 2013 and December 2015 despite histories of misconduct.
Johnson & Johnson paid Dr. Michael Reiss of New Jersey $85,000 for consulting through its pharmaceutical arm Janssen in December 2015. He’d just regained full use of his medical license that August; it had been suspended since 2012 because he’d pleaded guilty in federal court to hiding $2.5 million from the IRS in Swiss bank accounts.
When reached by phone, Reiss said Janssen had performed a background check, but couldn’t recall whether his disciplinary history had come up as part of his interview process. “Apparently it wasn’t an issue, they hired me,” he said. Reiss said he’s retired from practice aside from his consulting work, but declined to say what this consists of or whether he does work for Janssen or any other company.
Physicians whose state boards have sanctioned them for harming patients, unnecessarily prescribing addictive drugs, bilking federal insurance programs and even sexual misconduct nonetheless continue to receive payments for consulting, giving talks about products, and more.
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Dollars for Docs - How Industry Dollars Reach Your Doctors:
https://projects.propublica.org/docdollars/
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Police Snap Up Cheap Cellphone Trackers - More local law-enforcement agencies use ‘Jugulars’ and ‘Wolfhounds,’ partly because they might not require court orders, by Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, in The Wall Street Journal.
Local law-enforcement agencies are buying cellphone-tracking devices that are cheaper and smaller than earlier systems, partly because they might not require court orders.
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Can big data stop bad cops?, by Kimbriell Kelly, in The Washington Post.
Police mine data to identify troubled officers and intervene before they misbehave
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+Umesh Heendeniya you have a great head on your shoulde.
You be posting some real shit
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New York City, Peter Liang to Pay $4.1 Million Settlement to Family of Akai Gurley, by Chris Fuchs, in NBC News.
       New York City reached a settlement Monday in the wrongful death lawsuit of Akai Gurley, agreeing to pay more than $4 million to the family of the 28-year-old fatally shot by police in a Brooklyn housing project in November 2014. A New York City Law Department spokesperson told NBC News that the city will pay $4.1 million, the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) $400,000, and former New York Police Department Officer Peter Liang $25,000.
       The money will be placed in a fund for Gurley's four-year-old daughter, Akaila, which she won't have access to without court approval until she turns 18, according to the Daily News, which quoted Scott Rynecki, the attorney representing Kimberly Ballinger, the mother of Gurley's daughter. That money will be invested in annuities to provide around $10 million for Akaila over her life, the Daily News reported.
       A jury convicted Liang in February of second-degree manslaughter and official misconduct for accidentally firing a shot while, with his gun drawn, he began a vertical patrol with his partner on the eighth floor of a darkened stairwell at the Louis H. Pink Houses. In April, a judge reduced Liang's manslaughter conviction to criminally negligent homicide and sentenced Liang to five years probation and 800 hours of community service. A month later, Liang began serving out his sentence at a non-profit community center in the city, cleaning tables, mopping floors, and preparing meals.
The NYC Law Department told NBC News that the city will pay $4.1 million, the Housing Authority $400,000, and former NYPD officer Peter Liang $25,000.
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Blaming dad didn’t help ex-banker accused of insider trading, by Kaja Whitehouse, in The NY Post.
       An ex-Wall Street investment banker was convicted on Wednesday of engaging in insider trading by tipping his father, Robert Stewart, off to unannounced healthcare mergers, a victory for prosecutors after an appellate ruling made it harder to pursue such cases harder. Sean Stewart, who previously worked at Perella Weinberg Partners and JPMorgan Chase & Co , was found guilty by a federal jury in Manhattan on all nine counts he faced, including securities fraud.
       A Manhattan federal jury rejected claims by a former high-flying Wall Street executive that he was in the dark about his dad’s illegal trading of several health care mergers the banker son was privy to. A jury of five men and eight women found Sean Stewart guilty on all nine counts, including conspiracy to commit securities fraud and securities fraud. Stewart, 35, faces a maximum of 165 years in prison, but he will likely be sentenced to less than 10 years.
A Manhattan federal jury rejected claims by a former high-flying Wall Street executive that he was in the dark about his dad’s illegal trading of several health care mergers the banker son was priv…
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Ex-Wall Street banker convicted for giving father insider tips, by Nate Raymond, in Reuters:
https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/ex-wall-street-banker-convicted-giving-father-insider-142823271--sector.html
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Georgia dentist claims libel lawsuit was filed without his knowledge (though in his name), by Eugene Volokh, Esq., in The Volokh Conspiracy.
Last week, I blogged about a suspicious-looking strategy in an online libel case: Matthew Chan (a Georgia resident) posted on Yelp (and on some other sites) a negative review of Mitul Patel, a Suwanee, Ga., dentist. Chan next heard about the matter when Yelp forwarded to him a takedown request, which was accompanied by a Baltimore court order in a case titled “Mitul Patel v. Mathew Chan,” with the “Mathew Chan” listed as a Baltimore resident (though the order required the takedown of posts that were written by Matthew Chan of Georgia). A libel lawsuit had been filed in Baltimore trial court, together with a purported agreement from Patel and the Baltimore Chan to have the case be settled with a takedown injunction — and without serving the Georgia Matthew Chan.
Now there’s a new twist: Patel’s lawyer, Stuart J. Oberman, is stating that “Dr. Patel had no knowledge whatsoever regarding the lawsuit that was filed in the Maryland Circuit Court” until the story about this was broken last week by Paul Alan Levy (Public Citizen). “Dr. Patel never signed the Complaint, and never authorized any individual or company to file the Complaint on his behalf…. Furthermore, Dr. Patel never signed the Consent Motion for Injunction and Final Judgment.” Instead, he argues, someone “apparently forged Dr. Patel’s signature to the Complaint and Consent Motion,” “for some unknown reason.” You can see Oberman’s letter to Levy and Levy’s response, as well as Levy’s follow-up post on the matter.
Yet who would engage in such a forgery? It cost $185 to file a complaint in Maryland trial court; someone had to have a motive to pay that. (I am told that the clerk’s office said the fee was paid in cash.) Oberman said, in an e-mail responding to my query, that “Dr. Patel did hire a reputation management company, and we are in the process of determining whether they were involved in filing the Maryland lawsuit.
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Georgia Dentist Mitul Patel Acknowledges That “Consent Order” Was a Fraud, but Claims He is the Real Victim, by Paul Levy, Esq.:
http://pubcit.typepad.com/clpblog/2016/08/georgia-dentist-mitul-patel-acknowledges-that-consent-order-was-a-fraud-but-claims-he-is-the-real-vi.html
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Army Maj. Gen. David Haight, Army Ranger, decorated combat veteran and family man, held a key post in Europe this spring and a future with three, maybe four stars. He also led a double life: an 11-year affair and a “swinger lifestyle” of swapping sexual partners that put him at risk of blackmail and espionage, according to interviews and documents. Jennifer Armstrong, 49, a government employee, said she and Haight had been involved in the torrid love affair that began more than 10 years ago in Baghdad and ended this spring.
Haight’s case also underscores the military’s continuing problem with misconduct among its most senior officers. In November, Defense Secretary Ash Carter abruptly fired his senior military adviser, Army Lt. Gen. Ron Lewis for personal misconduct; the Pentagon inspector general continues to investigate Lewis. In March, the Air Force fired one of its top officers, Lt. Gen. John Hesterman, after investigators determined that he had sent sexually suggestive emails to a married female officer. And the Navy continues to investigate a slew of commanders ensnared in the “Fat Leonard” bribery scandal in which they traded secret information about ship movements for prostitutes and other blandishments to enrich Glenn Defense Marine Asia and its flamboyant owner “Fat Leonard” Glenn Francis.
The two lived not far from each other in Northern Virginia, and Haight stopped at her house most nights after work before going to his own home, she said. Armstrong found partners for the couple, and email on his military account shows that he asked after them and their availability. These encounters took place for about a year when Haight asked Armstrong whether she wanted to involve men. “Do you want another guy?” She declined.
Soon, a friend suggested that they should go to a club where members engage in sex with strangers. They went to clubs in Baltimore and near the Army War College in Carlisle Barracks, Pa., Armstrong said. They visited others when he traveled, including Tampa and Atlanta where they were almost recognized by another soldier when Haight was the Army’s Chief of Infantry, she said. Armstrong has also recognized other swingers at the Pentagon when her job took her there, she said.
The inspector general's report refers to testimony that indicates Armstrong and Haight "visited swingers' clubs while he was stationed at Fort Benning, Georgia." Haight was assigned to Benning from July 2012 to October 2013. They also had “parties” at Armstrong’s house. Some of the sex parties were arranged with partners through emails pinged back and forth to find convenient times. She described the sex as “non-emotional intimacy.” There were no drugs or alcohol involved, she said.
In 2015, anonymous tips about Haight’s extramarital affairs were brought to the Pentagon’s inspector general. Ultimately, the Army’s inspector general took the case. The Army ordered Haight to sever contact with Armstrong. Investigators interviewed her and others and substantiated allegations that he had "had an affair and lived a 'swinger lifestyle.' " Investigators also determined that he had spent nearly 24 hours on his government cellphone and sent more than 800 emails on his military computer to Armstrong. Haight, the report noted, declined to testify or answer questions provided through his attorney. The letter of reprimand effectively ended his 30-year career. A board will determine his retirement rank. A clean record could have earned Haight as much nearly $123,000 in his first year of retirement. If he’s busted back to colonel, his pay could drop to about $98,000.
Army Maj. Gen. David Haight, Army Ranger, decorated combat veteran and family man, led a double life: an 11-year affair and a “swinger lifestyle” of swapping sexual partners that put him at risk of blackmail and espionage, according to interviews and documents.
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The Reason Black Lives Matter Isn't Just for Black People, by Danielle DeCourcey.
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Cincinnati police union wants more pay for officers to wear body cameras, by Sharon Coolidge (The Cincinnati Enquirer), in USA Today Network.
Currently there are no planned negotiations. The two sides are at war over a pay raise.
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Speculation about Milwaukee shooting video mounts, by Ashley Luthern, in Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
       Four days after a police officer fatally shot an armed man, leading to a violent disturbance in the Sherman Park neighborhood, the video captured by the officer’s body camera has not yet been released. And there’s no indication it will be any time soon. The body camera footage was turned over to the Wisconsin Department of Justice’s Division of Criminal Investigation, which is leading the probe into the fatal shooting at the request of Milwaukee police — and in compliance with a 2014 state law requiring outside investigation of officer-involved deaths. Earlier this week, the state Justice Department released a statement saying officials there are “working expeditiously” to provide a “transparent view” of what took place, but was “not prepared to release any of the video evidence at this time.”
       The video apparently doesn’t answer all the questions surrounding the incident. “I can’t tell when the officer discharges his firearm because with many body worn cameras — certainly all of ours — there’s a 30 second delay before the audio kicks on,” Flynn said on Sunday. “I don’t know when the shots were fired.” It's unclear exactly when Heaggan activated the recorder. The department’s Taser Axon Flex cameras run in “standby mode” and have a 30-second pre-buffer, meaning once an officer hits record, the previous 30 seconds of video become part of that recording — though those don’t have sound. The department chose that brand after testing four manufacturers’ devices during a 2013 pilot program.
       Milwaukee police officers do not use chest-mounted cameras, because officials here wanted a recording similar to an officer’s line of sight. Officers can wear the cameras by using clear glasses or sunglasses, a metal band under the shirt collar, a headphone-like band that wraps around the back of the head or a vest mount at shoulder-level. All of the video footage is stored off-site by Taser and, per department policy, any footage of a fatal police shooting or other critical incident is permanently retained. According to the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission, original video is always left intact as originally recorded. A “robust” tracking feature identifies in detail any copies made and who makes them. An officer can face discipline up to termination for misuse of a body camera, based on the department’s Code of Conduct.
There's no indication the body camera video of the Sherman Park shooting will be released soon. And that has fueled speculation about what it contains.
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Police Body Worn Cameras - A Policy Scorecard, by The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights:
https://www.bwcscorecard.org
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When Police Don’t Live in the City They Serve, by John Eligon and Kay Nolan, in The New York Times.
African-Americans in Milwaukee worry that the elimination of a residency requirement for police officers will worsen a long-strained relationship with the community.
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Education
  • Virginia Commonwealth University
    Computer Science, 1996 - 2000
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Tagline
Law Student & Computer Systems Administrator.
Introduction
My name is Umesh Heendeniya. I was born in Sri Lanka and I Immigrated to the USA.

I'm an Honorably Discharged Former U.S. Marine who served in Active Duty and the Reserves. I served from June 1998 to April, 2001.

I have a B.Sc. in Computer Science and I worked in the IT sector for some time, first as a Java programmer and then as a Computer Systems Administrator.

I currently study Law. I am interested in the areas of Civil Rights, Disability Discrimination, Personal Injury, Products Liability, and Criminal Law.

I'm very interested in the areas of Finance, Computer Security, and Law.

 
Bragging rights
Honorably Discharged Former U.S. Marine (June 1998 to April 2001).
Work
Occupation
Law Student, Computer Systems Administrator
Employment
  • Phillip Morris (Altria) Inc.
    Computer Systems Administrator
  • Lead Dog Consulting
    Java, Visual Basic, and Unix Programmer
  • US Marine Corps (Active Duty & Reserves)
    Amphibious Assault Vehicle Crewman
  • VCU Computing Services
    Computer Lab Monitor
  • VCU College of Humanities & Sciences
    Computer Technician
  • IKON Printer Solutions.
    Printer Technician
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Spring Hill, Florida, USA.
Previously
Richmond, Virginia, USA - Parris Island, North Carolina, USA - Camp Lejune, North Carolina, USA - Camp Pendleton, California, USA - Colombo, Sri Lanka
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508-263-0145
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Spring Hill, Florida, USA
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508-263-0145
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Spring Hill, Florida, USA