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Tyler Tervooren
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Tyler Tervooren

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A four-year-old boy sits at home, playing with his toys. He’s hungry, but he doesn’t tell anyone. He’s tired, but only his posture reveals it. Four years old and he can’t (or won’t) speak. Every day, his family wonders, “What’s wrong with this boy? Is he mentally disabled?”

When he starts school, his teachers and classmates think him a dunce. They try to teach him art and languages, but he doesn’t pick them up like the other kids. He’s only learned enough German to get by.

In high school, he repeats his sentences to himself. Everyone thinks he’s slow. He applies to college, but fails the entrance exams. Eventually, he earns his degree, but can’t get the teaching job he wants, so he spends his days working in a boring patent office.

But, through the many years growing up and thought of as a nobody capable of nothing, the young man told himself a different story. He knew he was good at something, and that something was science. He spent all his free time and energy honing his thoughts until he had something worth sharing.

The young man was Albert Einstein and, in 1905, he shared four ideas that would become the foundation of modern physics. [1] [2]

Einstein was a genius. We all know that today, but it couldn’t have been further from obvious in his formative years.

Did he make the impact on the world he did just because he was smart? Does intelligence shine through despite the odds? Probably not. There are lots brilliant people who never overcome the hurdles of being misunderstood and made to feel they don’t belong.

Brilliance was one critical ingredient in the Einstein formula, but an equally important element was likely how he thought about himself—his ability to keep working and see his own worth when everything around him suggested he didn’t have any.

Today, there’s convincing evidence from the psychological study of high schoolers that how well you perform in life depends a lot on how much you believe you can improve when it seems like you’re not achieving anything.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/self-doubt/
Einstein's grade school teachers thought he was a dunce. A recent study about self-doubt explains how he might have overcome that damning label.
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Tyler Tervooren

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I’ve spent my whole life thinking I knew the best way to learn. After years of trying different styles, I was certain I knew the best and only to get myself to retain new knowledge and actually understand difficult concepts.

Then I met Breanne Dyck, an education ninja who’s spent her adult life debunking myths about how we learn and building learning systems from sound research that help people significantly speed up the time it takes to grasp new concepts.

Breanne and I thought it would be fun to host free webinar on the topic, and I want to invite you to join us. We’re going to cover three lies and one truth about how to learn new skills quickly. Here are the details:

Topic: Supercharge Your Learning: 3 Lies And 1 Truth About How We Learn
When: Thursday, June 25th at 4:00 PM Pacific
Where: http://app.webinarjam.net/register/17804/23c8921ac6
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Anne was a struggling actor in New York. Trying to get her foot in the door somewhere—anywhere—she set out to hire an agent. A few calls later and she was sitting down for an interview. Things seemed to be going well. Maybe too well. After a few questions, Anne realized she’d come across town for nothing. The agent didn’t want to find her work—he wanted to date her. She left the office crying, wondering why she couldn’t get the respect she deserved in her career.

That’s when she met Jerry, another struggling actor who happened to be sitting in the waiting room of that same office as Anne came out. Jerry consoled her a moment, they chatted, and decided to go for coffee.

The rest, as they say, is history. The actors in this story are Anne Meara and Jerry Stiller—one of Hollywood’s favorite couples. [1]

The story of their meeting is fun, but the rest of their tale is far more meaningful. Meara passed away just a few weeks ago. They’d been married 60 years. That’s an incredible accomplishment for any couple, but nearly unheard of in the land of fame and fortune. What was the glue that held their marriage together as they crossed the minefield of failed relationships that seem to litter the landscape of the rich and famous.

Jerry and Meara’s “relationship theory”—the way they thought about their marriage and how it should work—gave them a distinct advantage that kept them happy all those years.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/relationship-theory/
Research on relationships shows that if if you want stronger, long-lasting connections, you have to develop the right mindset.
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Vijay Gururani's profile photoDustin Main's profile photo
 
The two great mind make the moment first and rest they enjoy all moment by moment....
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Tyler Tervooren

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“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” – Aristotle

A few days ago, I was entering the miles I ran last week into my tracking sheet (I’m a nerd like that). I looked at the total distance for the year so far and realized my shoes were in dire need of replacement. “So that’s why my feet are getting so torn up and my joints have been sore,” I muttered.

When my wife overhead, she offered to ask a friend for a pass to the Nike employee store; living in Portland and having friends that work at Nike HQ we have easy access to big discounts on the best new gear. We could get a pass in the next week or two.

I thought about it for a second, and then I went online and immediately bought a pair of running shoes at full price and even paid a little more for faster shipping.

Why on Earth did I do that?

One reason is I planned my shoe replacement poorly (doh!). But the more important reason is, after seven years of success, I know exactly how to make myself stick to my running habit and, in this case, it meant getting a new pair of shoes on my feet as quickly as possible, regardless the cost.

Instead of going for savings—something that’s also important to me—I chose minimal down time instead. I was optimizing for repetition.

If you’ve ever struggled making a new habit stick, this way of thinking could make a big difference in your success.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/habit-repetition/
You know what to do to create a new habit—repeat it over and over. Here's why that's so hard and an idea for how to get better at it.
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Vijay Gururani's profile photo
 
Men only make that way which comes freely by all his sarroronding...

And Excelance depends different way of individual.

Where Only Ethics...Education... Environment...
Make any individual.. Excellence.
Mr.Tyler
Keep touch with your thoughtful draft..
Hope we make some great way of undersating of Different topic!!
Thanks Brother!!
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More than 1,000 retired workers, all aged 75 or above, stood in line. They were about to sit down to a barrage of tests judging their memory and thinking skills. The tests were grueling, and it was only the beginning. For eight years, these retirees would line up every 18 months for the same battery of tests and evaluations, almost as if they were migratory birds following their instincts.

But they weren’t compelled to subject themselves to the draining tasks and judgments. No, they volunteered—and for good reason.

The brains of these older men and women held the answer to a question neuroscience researchers believed they could unlock: Does a life of stressful and demanding work actually make you mentally healthy?

After eight years of tireless study, sifting through mountains of data, and controlling for every possible variable, they had their answer:

Your life of constant stressors that require fast thinking, prioritizing, and decision making—the things you complain leave you exhausted every day after work—are actually making your brain stronger and preparing it for top performance for years to come.

If you ever worry about the stress and constant juggling of priorities in your life… that’s probably good. You don’t want it to become unhealthy. But you don’t want to eliminate it, either. Your difficult work—the things you struggle with but are proud to accomplish—are actually keeping you healthy for a lifetime.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/brain-exercise/
New neuroscience research shows you can keep your brain healthy in much the same way you keep your body fit. And the results last a lifetime.
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Meet Bella, the most timid dog on Earth.

For human to Bella interactions, her disposition is ideal. She’ll come right up to you, but she’s too afraid to jump. Even the most dog-fearing child can find a friend in Bella.

For interactions with other dogs, though, her personality is a problem. Other dogs sense her extreme submissiveness and prey on it. Her fearful instincts broadcast to the world, “I’m a victim!.”

In the last year, Bella has had the ever-lovin’ tar beaten out of her three times. It got so bad, my wife and I decided something had to be done to increase her confidence so every dog she passes doesn’t try to kill her.

We started by training her to walk more attentively. And I read somewhere that a dog’s tail up in the air signals confidence. Bella’s tail was always tucked between her legs, so I’d tie the leash around it and hold it up for her. After some months of doing this each day, it’s actually working. She walks with a little more purpose and holds her head and tail up. Other dogs have noticed. They don’t try to murder her as often.

Bella has, effectively, changed herself, or at least the way others perceive her. And that perception has completely changed (okay, it has kind of changed) the way she gets treated.

Have you ever felt like you don’t get the respect you deserve? Like people naturally take advantage of you or see you in a way you wish they didn’t? Maybe you’re a target for every salesman you meet, or maybe your boss is always assigning you the crappy jobs no one wants (and pick up some lattes while you’re at it).

If that’s you—often or even occasionally—have you considered it might have less to do with how others see you and more to do with how you show yourself? That the way people treat you is determined by you, not them?

Changing yourself is hard. Really hard. The personality you’ve developed over time is deeply ingrained. For every possible scenario you could face, your body and mind has a response it will default to. Without serious and careful intervention, these instincts take over without us even realizing it.

If my tiny-brained chihuahua can change her relationship with the world just by making a few minor adjustments to her behavior, though, I’d wager you can do the same.

Here’s what leads to these interactions that don’t work out in your favor and the small changes you can make to how you present yourself to get better results.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/psychology-of-respect/
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Tyler Tervooren

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When it comes to cooking, I know how to make a few things. There’s a list of recipes I stick to and if all the ingredients are available and I’m in a familiar kitchen I can make dinner.

I’m no chef. Even cook would be a stretch. What I am is a man who knows how to follow instructions. If the directions are well written and nothing goes wrong, you’ll get something edible at the end.

My wife, on the other hand, is a culinary genius. Everything she makes is exceptional and, if she follows a recipe, it’s one she created herself. Missing ingredient? No problem; she knows what to substitute. Working with a new oven? She can watch her dish for signs it’s ready.

These are skills I do not have. If you were to describe the difference between my wife and I, you could say that I know how to cook, but she understands food. I’m an imitator, she’s a master.

If you want to build a useful skill that will serve you for a lifetime you have to bridge the very wide gap between mimicry and mastery.

But how?

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/mastery/
The odds of success are great for those who do the hard work.
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Not everyone admits it, but everyone knows it—you’re working towards something. We all are. Some of us have jobs we’re trying to make ourselves the best at. Some of us are building things outside of working hours.

We have dreams. We have aspirations. When we have the time (and energy), we try to do something about it.

But life seems to get busier and busier every day. There’s no sign of slowing down. Sometimes you think, “This needs to wait. I can’t give it my best. I can’t create my masterpiece now.”

This is the beast speaking. You’d best not feed it.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/building-junk/
The most important time to create is when you want to the least.
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Can you believe it? This week, Riskology turned five years old! My, how the time flies.

To celebrate, we’re having a fun meet-up next week and, if you’ll be in the Portland area, I’d love it if you came out.

Here are the details:

What: Riskology’s 5-Year Birthday Party
When: Thursday, June 11 at 7:00pm
Where: Teote on SE 12th Ave.

RSVP Here: https://www.facebook.com/events/102210953451423/
This is a low-key get together for personal friends and local Riskology readers. Come have a drink on the epic Teote patio and help me figure out how the hell 5 years have gone by already. POSTS. News Feed. Jonathan Mead · May 31 at 11:22am ·. Dude, congrats on keeping it going for half a decade ...
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You probably don’t realize as you’re doing it—I don’t—but every day you quietly judge each person you meet. You look for clues that will tell you what type of person they are, if they’re confident in themselves, and whether you can trust them.

And everyone you meet is doing the same thing to you.

Have you ever met someone a few times and thought, “I really should like this person… but I don’t.” That’s the first impression at work. Something about the way they presented themselves to you in the first few moments of meeting triggered a negative response from your subconscious brain and, try as you might, you can’t shake it.

As you’ve probably heard at some point in a fight with a loved one, it’s not what you say, it’s how you say it. The majority of the communication you have with the people around you is non-verbal—your body language. And you’d hardly be alone if you don’t have a clue what it’s saying most of the time.

Today, that changes. And your relationships change with it.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/first-impression/
Here's what the decades of cumulative research say will actually help you make a great (or horrible) first impression in any situation.
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When was the last time you broke a world record by eating breakfast? Never, that’s when. But that’s all about to change.

It’s that time of year again—time to come together to set yet another Guinness World Record! The World Domination Summit is coming up in July and, as part of the fun, we’ll be setting our third world record. Unlike WDS itself, our record attempts are open to the public. If you can be in Portland, OR on Friday, July 10, then we want and need you there.

This year, the task required is simpler than ever: join us for the world’s biggest breakfast in bed party (yes, seriously).

Continue reading and sign up: http://riskology.co/welcoming-worldwide-waffles/
On July 10, 2015, 600+ Portlanders and world travelers will converge to break the most delicious world record ever attempted. Will you join us?
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There’s nothing like the feeling of being recognized by someone you admire—the validation you get learning someone you respect also respects you.

I imagine that’s how Tom Toro felt when he sat down at his mother’s computer on his 28th birthday to find an email from The New Yorker with the subject line, “Cartoon Sold.” He’d done it. Tom got his first cartoon into a major publication. I don’t know what he did that night but, considering it was his birthday, hopefully there was some celebration involved.

Today, Tom draws regularly for The New Yorker and a number of other publications. In the eyes of struggling artists everywhere, Tom has “made it.”

But, before that acceptance letter? Rejections. 609 of them, to be exact.

For more than a year, Tom Toro drew a cartoon every day and sent it off for consideration by the magazine. He did it from the kitchen table at his parents’ home. He lived there—nowhere else to go after dropping out of film school with a mountain of debt.

Imagine yourself in Tom’s shoes—completely changing your life path, working through bouts of extreme depression, and bills piling up as fast as the rejection letters from the people who held his future in their hands.

Most of us wouldn’t have the stomach for it. As the failures piled up, you’d start asking yourself, “Should I be doing this at all?” And you’d likely decide—emphatically—”no” and move onto the backup plan (if you had one).

But Tom persevered. Despite the hundreds of rejection letters that collectively said, “Maybe you should reconsider this career path” he kept going. He kept going because he knew something about failure that many never realize: he only had to get one yes to erase all the noes and that getting that yes was completely within his own control if he carefully analyzed each failure.

Tom knew that success was a mindset.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/succeed-once/
The people at the top of their games are the ones who kept the right mindset through all the failures along the way.
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Have him in circles
1,712 people
Rajeev Goswami's profile photo
John Flynn's profile photo
Nick Fisher's profile photo
Anbazhagan Ramasamy's profile photo
Manish Shah's profile photo
Javi Muñoz Díaz's profile photo
Berry Oluoch's profile photo
Gwenn Mullins's profile photo
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Writer and course creator
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Founder of Riskology.co
Introduction
Writer, adventurer, and chief imperialist at Riskology.co.

I spend my days traveling to strange places and thinking of strange things to do.
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I organized a successful world record attempt with more than 600 people floating on inner tubes.
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
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Portland
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