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Tyler Tervooren
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Tyler Tervooren

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Picture this for a moment:

You’re sitting at work when the phone rings. You’ve been waiting for this call. You don’t know what the person on the other side will say, but you know there’s a big opportunity on the line—one that could change your life, skyrocket your career, improve your family.

But there’s also a risk involved. If you say yes, it could go wrong, even if the odds are slim.

Now, a question: What’s the best time of day to make this decision?

Sounds like a funny question. Why would it matter? If you know there’s a great opportunity—even if a slight risk—won’t you make the right choice regardless when you’re asked? Most research says no.

In reality, you’re faced with all kinds of decisions every day:

- What time should I get out of bed?
- How much should I save for retirement?
- When should I feed the cat?
- Do my toes look funny?
- Should I get married?
- So on and so forth…

Individually, these questions aren’t hard to answer—even the deeper, more involved ones can be simple to decide. But, together, the sum is greater than the parts. If you try to ask yourself all these questions at the same time, you’ll melt down. It would be a terrible, draining day.

You would experience, as the experts call it, decision fatigue—the inability to make a smart, rational choice after having to make others before it. [1]

But you’re a leader, aren’t you? You want to be, at least. You have lots of decisions to make each day and how you decide them will have a big impact not just on your life, but the lives of the people around you. They’re counting on you to make good choices. Are you making the best ones possible on the decisions that matter?

The bad news is you probably aren’t—at least not all the time. But the good news is there’s a single strategy you can start using almost instantly to fix the problem.

By the time you finish reading this, you’ll have already fundamentally improved your ability to make smart decisions about life’s biggest choices.

Keep reading: http://riskology.co/decision-automation/
When you automate decisions that don't matter, your willpower increases and you get incredibly good at making decisions that do.
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Tyler Tervooren

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It was 1993 when Craig decided to change careers. 17 years at IBM and it was time for a shakeup. Charles Schwab came calling from across the country in San Francisco.

Craig was 40 and starting over. The job kept him busy, but he’d make time to for local programming events where he met others in his field and kept track of what was going on in the industry. Pretty soon, he was a regular at the meetups and thought, “Hey, there should be a way for everyone to keep up with what’s going on.”

As a software developer, Craig was a techie, so he started an email list where he and his friends could update each other about different events going on in town.

It was a hit and lots of people started using it. It was perfect for Craig—a fun side project that didn’t take too much work. He spent his days banging out work for Charles Schwab and his evenings managing “the list.”

After a while, people started posting about other things. When someone was moving, they’d notify everyone their apartment was available and maybe sell some of their furniture. They bought cars from each other and listed jobs for their employers.

When there got to be too many emails crowding everyone’s inboxes, Craig decided to make a change. He shut down the email list and moved everything to a website.

Picking the name for the URL was easy—Craigslist. And, as a fun and rewarding side project, he kept working his day job for three more years before thinking, “Hey, I could probably do this Craigslist thing full-time.” [1]

Craigslist is one of my favorite side project turned megahit stories, but there are many more like it. More importantly, there are millions of successful businesses you’ve never heard of that were built in someone’s spare time.

If you’ve ever had a big idea and thought, “There’s no way I can make time for it,” there are a lot of real-life stories that say, “Yes, you can.”

You can build big things in your spare time. Here’s how to do it.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/craigslist-method/
Many great businesses started as part time projects. Here's how to start yours when you don't have time.
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“I’m sure it will work out perfectly,” I said.
“No you aren’t,” she instantly shot back.

I’m discussing some potential hiccups in our upcoming travel plans with my wife. I made a mistake with our booking, and I’m trying to reassure her it’s no big deal. She’s not buying it.

“What, how can you say that? You don’t believe me?”
“Nope.”
“Why not?”
“You’re pulling on your collar.”

I was pulling on my collar. What does that have to do with this exchange? If you don’t know me well, it’s a good question. But if you do, you’re already laughing and saying to yourself, “Ah, yes. She caught you, you liar.”

My collar, more specifically me touching it, is my tell—a behavioral clue that I was trying to hide something. [1] My wife knows my tell better than anyone. She can spot even the smallest display of it the way a master poker player can instantly tell if you have a great hand or not.

I wasn’t lying. I did think everything was going to be okay. But I wasn’t certain of it. More like… 80%. That minor difference caused me some nervousness, and I was displaying it clearly by rubbing my shirt collar.

We all have a tell. In fact, we have lots of them and we put them on display every day.

When you think about this, your mind probably goes directly to lying. But that’s just one example. There are lots of times our tells come out when we’re not lying. In fact, you might be telling the absolute truth, but find that people don’t believe you. Why? Because your tells are a giveaway that you’re uncomfortable. When this happens, you undermine your own words.

If you’ve ever encountered a situation where you felt weak, nervous, or uncomfortable but wanted to appear strong and confident, learning to manage the signals you put out is critical part of the equation.

Here’s your cheat sheet for looking on point and in control when you’re feeling exactly the opposite on the inside.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/insecurity-signals/
There are lots of body language signals that tell others you aren't totally confident, but they're surprisingly easy to spot and correct.
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Last Friday, I did what I do every summer here in Portland: hang out with hundreds of people from around the world to set some sort of crazy world record as the opening to the World Domination Summit, an event I help organize.

This year, after wearing ourselves out the previous years, we asked ourselves, “What’s the laziest record we could set?” It took some hard thought, but we landed on, “biggest breakfast in bed party.” What could be lazier than that?

As expected, it turned out to be a lot more work than we originally planned, but the results were worth it. We broke the record (currently held in China) with 600 people in Pioneer Courthouse Square all eating breakfast together.

These kinds of events are better explained with pictures and videos than words, so check out the recap video.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/world-record-2015/
On July 10, 2015, 600 people from around the world came together to break the world record for "biggest breakfast in bed party." The results were... amazing.
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Make a nervous smile for me if the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” has ever made you shiver with uncertainty. Feel that twinge of contempt if you’ve noticed your friends all fit neatly into categorized careers—doctors, lawyers, accountants, managers, etc.—and you’re still not sure what to call yourself.

Raise your hand if you’ve ever felt like you have too many interests to find your “one true calling.”

But what if the idea of that “one true calling” is a myth? What if you’re not supposed to find it? What if your one true calling is a combination of things that don’t fit together in a tidy category?

My friend and incredibly smart colleague—Emilie Wapnick—runs a website called Puttlylike for people in exactly this situation. She calls them “multipotentialites”—people who have many callings instead of one. In a recent TEDx talk, she explains three compelling reasons why—if those situations I described above fit you—you’re actually ahead of the game and in a position to create something truly unique.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/one-calling/
For many of us, the idea of having "one true calling" is a myth. And that's a good thing for a lot of reasons.
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When it comes to cooking, I know how to make a few things. There’s a list of recipes I stick to and if all the ingredients are available and I’m in a familiar kitchen I can make dinner.

I’m no chef. Even cook would be a stretch. What I am is a man who knows how to follow instructions. If the directions are well written and nothing goes wrong, you’ll get something edible at the end.

My wife, on the other hand, is a culinary genius. Everything she makes is exceptional and, if she follows a recipe, it’s one she created herself. Missing ingredient? No problem; she knows what to substitute. Working with a new oven? She can watch her dish for signs it’s ready.

These are skills I do not have. If you were to describe the difference between my wife and I, you could say that I know how to cook, but she understands food. I’m an imitator, she’s a master.

If you want to build a useful skill that will serve you for a lifetime you have to bridge the very wide gap between mimicry and mastery.

But how?

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/mastery/
The odds of success are great for those who do the hard work.
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Tyler Tervooren

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“When I go to a baseball game, I can eat six, maybe seven hot dogs. I love hot dogs more than anything on Earth.”

This is the opening line from Mr. Hourigan, my high school Economics teacher. We’re learning the law of diminishing returns.

He goes on to explain how, though his love for brats runs deeper than human understanding, he starts to get tired of them after a while. Sure, each of those first three dogs make him happier and happier. Eventually, though, the next one isn’t quite as tasty as the last. After about six hot dogs, Mr. Hourigan hardly cares about hot dogs at all.

Admittedly, a strange comparison. Also a shockingly effective way to share a complex idea with a bunch of apathetic high schoolers.

The law of diminishing returns, put simply, describes how you can’t achieve endless efficiency in any system. More workers on a construction project won’t always make it finish faster. Speeding up an assembly line won’t guarantee you more widgets in an hour.

As a 17-year-old student, I didn’t care about construction projects or assembly lines. I didn’t care about hot dogs either, but I was intimately familiar with them. I knew if I ate too many, I wouldn’t like them as much. And Mr. Hourigan knew that’s all I needed to understand to get the lesson.

He compared something I already understood to something I didn’t and, suddenly, I understood it, too. It’s called schema learning, and it’s a well-documented educational tool.

You’re (probably) not an economics teacher. What you are, though, is someone with important ideas that need to be communicated effectively. You want to educate people, and you want to lead them to make smart decisions.

So, it’s critical you understand how to communicate your ideas using schema learning because there is no better tool to not only educate someone quickly but also persuade them to make smart decisions and accept good advice.

Keep reading: http://riskology.co/hot-dogs-and-economics-how-great-teachers-guarantee-learning/
People already understand complex ideas. If you can relate yours to the ones they already know, they'll learn yours too.
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Months ago, my friend launched a website. He was working tirelessly to build an audience but wasn’t getting traction.

One night over drinks he asked if I had any advice: “What can I do get more people to the site?” I’d paid attention to his project for a while and noticed a few things he could do better, so I gave him five pieces of advice without hardly taking a breath:

You need to promote your site to other audiences.
There’s no way to share the content on your site on social media. Fix that.
You should be building an email list.
Fix your home page so the benefit to a new visitor is more obvious.
Start writing compelling blog posts to speed up growth.
It’s a been a few months since that conversation. I checked his site yesterday. It looked exactly the same.

I was annoyed at first. “Why didn’t he listen? These things work!” Then, I shamefully remembered I’m no different. I’m surrounded by friends who are experts in fitness and nutrition. I often ask for tips to improve my workouts or my diet. Over the years, I’ve implemented about two of the 100+ pieces of advice I’ve received.

Steinbeck, I think, was on point with his opinion on advice. “You only want it if it agrees with what you wanted to do anyway.”

Why do we ignore advice? More importantly, why do we ignore good advice? Probably because it’s easy to.

If change is hard, then staying the same, inversely, is easy. We’re all so busy and overwhelmed these days, who has time to actually follow through on something new? And what we enjoy even more than asking for advice is disagreeing with it.

Sometimes, though, advice does get followed. Your friend finally tries that restaurant you knew she’d like. Your kid actually does his homework before it’s due. Your boss tweaks the big project based on your recommendations.

Advice  does get followed, just not often. That is, unless you work in one, specific field. If you work in this field, you enjoy knowing most the people you give advice to actually take action.

Who is this lucky bunch that walk around like gods of knowledge sharing? Doctors. And we have a lot to learn from them if we want to get better at getting the people we care about to do the things we know will help them. 

After all, the best advice is the advice that gets followed, right?

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/advice/
Great advice can change lives, but only if it's accepted. Here's the research behind giving advice that's taken seriously.
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You’re hardly alone if you’d describe yourself as “socially anxious.” Almost 5% of people suffer from some form of it. That doesn’t seem like a big number but, when you consider the whole world, that’s 350 million people.

You go to a party and freeze because everyone is looking at you. In meetings, you hope no one asks a question because you’re certain whatever you say will be wrong. Maybe you avoid close relationships because you can’t stand the idea of sharing personal details with someone else. What will they think when they find out you aren’t perfect?

If that describes you, chances are you’ve known it for a long time. Most people realize they’re socially anxious in their early teens.

And if you’ve ever talked to a doctor about it, you’ve probably gotten the same advice: you need more serotonin. Maybe you’ve even been prescribed a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Serotonin is a complex chemical, but the treatment is simple: more serotonin fixes all kinds of psychological problems, so why not anxiety, too?

Recent research from Uppsala University in Sweden, though, uncovered exactly the opposite. If you’re struggling with social anxiety, they found, you may actually have too much serotonin flowing through your brain.

This is a potentially huge revelation if you struggle with social anxiety. Here’s what the researchers found, and the things you can do now to act on those findings and reduce your social anxiety.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/social-anxiety/
New research shows everything we knew about fixing social anxiety could be wrong. Here's what may really work.
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Five years ago, I was unemployed and trying to get this website off the ground. Many details were figured out, but one that was missing was a design. I needed to style the site so it would look good when I launched.

Out of work, I didn’t feel comfortable spending money for a designer, so I decided to do it myself. The only problem? I had no idea what I was doing! I needed to learn.

I bought a WordPress theme that would allow me to skip learning HTML, but I still needed to pick up CSS if the site was going to have any unique style to it.

At first, I tried learning the way I’d always been taught to take on something new:

Research it.
Read / watch some training materials.
Look for an expert to help when I didn’t understand something.
Start experimenting.
I read books and blog posts and training lessons on CSS and felt overwhelmed—like there was too much to remember. And what I did remember wasn’t enough to put to use in a real world scenario. I was piecing together bits of knowledge here and there, but I couldn’t do anything with it.

After three months of frustration and a terrible looking website, I discovered this little tool built into most web browsers that lets you inspect any website. I could go to all my favorite sites and not just see how they were built but play with and change the code to see what would happen when I made little tweaks.

I’d take elements I liked from one site and plug them into my own. I didn’t know what would happen, but each experiment taught me something new. Sometimes the results were good. Other times they were bad. None of that really mattered, though. What was happening was real learning. Each time I tried something—even if I didn’t know what I was doing—I’d get instant feedback. Later, I’d go back to the manuals to read about what I’d just tried. Suddenly, it all made sense.

Two weeks later, I had a web design I was proud of.

Since then, I’ve been fascinated with finding the best ways to learn skills quickly. Turns out, there’s a lot of research to suggest the way most of us try to learn something new is slow, frustrating, and just not very successful.

As an adult with a busy life, when you need to learn something, you need it yesterday. If you can’t pick up new skills and knowledge quickly, you probably won’t even bother. Maybe that’s held you back from making a career switch or learning a hobby or something else important to you.

A few weeks ago, I sat down with Breanne Dyck and a hundred of you from our community for a webinar dedicated to the concepts of fast-paced learning.

We identified a few myths that hold you back from learning new skills as quickly as you could and, more importantly, one truth that could help you pick something new up incredibly fast if you use it the next time you need to learn something unfamiliar.

Here’s the entire webinar replay for you… completely free.

Watch the webinar: http://riskology.co/supercharge-your-learning/
Time is short. If you want to learn new skills fast, you need to understand the shortcuts that will supercharge your ability to retain knowledge.
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A four-year-old boy sits at home, playing with his toys. He’s hungry, but he doesn’t tell anyone. He’s tired, but only his posture reveals it. Four years old and he can’t (or won’t) speak. Every day, his family wonders, “What’s wrong with this boy? Is he mentally disabled?”

When he starts school, his teachers and classmates think him a dunce. They try to teach him art and languages, but he doesn’t pick them up like the other kids. He’s only learned enough German to get by.

In high school, he repeats his sentences to himself. Everyone thinks he’s slow. He applies to college, but fails the entrance exams. Eventually, he earns his degree, but can’t get the teaching job he wants, so he spends his days working in a boring patent office.

But, through the many years growing up and thought of as a nobody capable of nothing, the young man told himself a different story. He knew he was good at something, and that something was science. He spent all his free time and energy honing his thoughts until he had something worth sharing.

The young man was Albert Einstein and, in 1905, he shared four ideas that would become the foundation of modern physics. [1] [2]

Einstein was a genius. We all know that today, but it couldn’t have been further from obvious in his formative years.

Did he make the impact on the world he did just because he was smart? Does intelligence shine through despite the odds? Probably not. There are lots brilliant people who never overcome the hurdles of being misunderstood and made to feel they don’t belong.

Brilliance was one critical ingredient in the Einstein formula, but an equally important element was likely how he thought about himself—his ability to keep working and see his own worth when everything around him suggested he didn’t have any.

Today, there’s convincing evidence from the psychological study of high schoolers that how well you perform in life depends a lot on how much you believe you can improve when it seems like you’re not achieving anything.

Continue reading: http://riskology.co/self-doubt/
Einstein's grade school teachers thought he was a dunce. A recent study about self-doubt explains how he might have overcome that damning label.
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Great Albert..... Done Nothing extraordinary .....my best knowledge he has just upgrade all his views and mesured them by his own standard & scale......and given output ..
That we says Exteraordaniry..

Genius people only ...Think lot..feel lot..See lot..
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Tyler Tervooren

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I’ve spent my whole life thinking I knew the best way to learn. After years of trying different styles, I was certain I knew the best and only to get myself to retain new knowledge and actually understand difficult concepts.

Then I met Breanne Dyck, an education ninja who’s spent her adult life debunking myths about how we learn and building learning systems from sound research that help people significantly speed up the time it takes to grasp new concepts.

Breanne and I thought it would be fun to host free webinar on the topic, and I want to invite you to join us. We’re going to cover three lies and one truth about how to learn new skills quickly. Here are the details:

Topic: Supercharge Your Learning: 3 Lies And 1 Truth About How We Learn
When: Thursday, June 25th at 4:00 PM Pacific
Where: http://app.webinarjam.net/register/17804/23c8921ac6
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Writer and course creator
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Founder of Riskology.co
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Writer, adventurer, and chief imperialist at Riskology.co.

I spend my days traveling to strange places and thinking of strange things to do.
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I organized a successful world record attempt with more than 600 people floating on inner tubes.
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