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Tyler Tervooren
Works at Riskology.co
Lives in Portland
1,839 followers|92,006 views
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Tyler Tervooren

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A sabbatical is a great way to make the work you do even better. But few people have the time to actually take one. Here's how you can fit one into your busy life.

http://riskology.co/sabbatical/
A sabbatical is a great way to make the work you do better. But few people have time to actually take one. Here's how you can fit one into your busy life.
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Tyler Tervooren

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When your priorities are out of order, you create a lot of unnecessary work for yourself. Adjusting can be scary, but the result could change your life.

http://riskology.co/reorganize-work/
When your priorities are out of order, you create a lot of unnecessary work for yourself. Adjusting can be scary, but the result could change your life.
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Tyler Tervooren

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It's normal to think your biggest ideas are your best ones. It's actually the opposite. Your best ideas will start tiny and have these three characteristics.

http://riskology.co/tiny-ideas/
Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)It’s normal to think your biggest ideas are your best ones.…
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Tyler Tervooren

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These are the most important decisions we've made over the last 5 years to create an event that's fun and meaningful for introverts.

http://riskology.co/introvert-friendly-events/
Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)These are the most important decisions we’ve made over the …
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Tyler Tervooren

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It was a tough day in the trenches at The Travel Hacking Cartel, a business I run with friends.

We’d launched a new feature and the support inbox was blowing up with requests to test it out. Just when I’d worked through the backlog of support tickets (yep, I still do the support tickets), one last message comes in from Nora, a longtime member:

Hi, I’m checking my credit card statement and it looks like I’m being billed twice every month.

Hmm, haven’t seen that one before. Sure enough, though, two accounts had somehow been created, and she’d paid twice for a long time.

Looking back, there are lots of ways to solve this problem but, in the moment, I was tired and uncreative. I couldn’t see an easy answer to the problem. So, I do what I do every time I feel burned out in the middle of the day; I head to the coffee shop. I order kombucha and hand over my credit card. The barista starts to pull the tap and, halfway though, it starts to fizz out. She moves to the second tap and tries again. Nothing. Kombucha’s gone.

The barista looks at me with a frown and apologizes. I’ve already paid, but there’s no kombucha and she can’t run refunds from her terminal. She thinks for a second and comes up with the perfect solution: “If you want to order something else, I’ll give you a gift certificate for a kombucha. Come back tomorrow and it’ll be ready for you.” I happily took the offer and was on my way.

When I sat down with my revised order and opened my laptop, I knew exactly how to respond to Nora:

Hey! You’re right. I’m so sorry about that. What if I take what you’ve paid so far and credit your account so you don’t have to pay again for a long time?

Nora was perfectly happy with that, and the problem was solved.

Neither of these scenarios are what you probably think of when you think of creativity.[1] No one wrote a song, drafted a book, painted a mural, or designed a product. But they were creative. They were unique solutions to a difficult problem.

Creativity is all around us but, for so many, it remains invisible—hidden in plain sight—because we’ve conditioned ourselves to look for it in only a few places. There are so many places you can draw new ideas from to improve your work if you look just a little harder.

When you have a problem to solve or need to create something new and keep coming up short, try these practical ideas for finding inspiration and upping your game.

Full post: http://riskology.co/practical-creativity/
Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Creativity is everywhere. The more you see and appreciate it in d…
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I stood on stage, looking out over the hundreds focused on me—waiting for me to speak, to say anything— and the voice in the back of head made it’s way forward to remind me, “You’re not the right person for this.”

I was the opening talk for the TEDx event, and it was up to me to set the tone. This is an extraordinary responsibility on top of giving the most important talk of your life and, had it been any other circumstance, I might have given into that voice. “Yeah, you’re right. I shouldn’t be here. I’m an introvert. I’m an internal editor. I can’t even finish a sentence with my wife without wanting a do-over.”

Thankfully, I’d done my homework. Not just on the talk, but on how to keep from self-destructing. I knew what I needed to say, I believed in the message, and I had a plan even if the perfect circumstances I spent so much time practicing in didn’t reflect reality on game day.

Today, I can get on stage in front of a few thousand people and say what I think is important with confidence and authority. If I’m lucky, some finesse and a few jokes that aren’t total duds. But it hasn’t always been this way.

When it comes to public speaking, any confidence I have today is the result of a tremendous amount of work, frustration, cold sweats, and embarrassment. But I’m glad I had those experiences because they got me here—a place I can share some lessons about how to go from a terrified, bumbling idiot to a calm, confident communicator.

That, perhaps, will be the most useful part of this article for you—simply knowing that public speaking skills can be learned. You don’t have to be born with them.

From sharing an idea with a small team of friends to selling one to thousands of strangers on the main stage, these are the lessons— many from speakers far better than me, I should add—that have changed me from a timid, stuttering presenter to a confident, respected one. I hope they help you spread your own big ideas.
A lot of extroverted experts have great advice for speaking skills. Here's what's worked for this introvert.
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#2 has been a saving grace for me as well! I create a lean agenda for all my classes, a checklist of items for me to look at, and then I launch forward. Otherwise, I'd be dropping cue cards with a bright blush on my face.
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Tyler Tervooren

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From what we know about crowd psychology and how tipping points work, introverts are naturally well-adjusted to make their ideas spread quickly.

http://riskology.co/tipping-points-introverts-ideas/
From what we know about crowd psychology and how tipping points work, introverts are naturally well-adjusted to make their ideas spread quickly.
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Tyler Tervooren

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Most people are bad at pacing on big challenges. They lumber on forever or push too hard and burn out. Here's how to happily  commit for the long-term.

http://riskology.co/equal-effort-theory/
Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Most people are bad at pacing on big challenges. They lumber on f…
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Excellent!
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Tyler Tervooren

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Hey friends,

One of my businesses, the Travel Hacking Cartel, is hiring a Front Desk Agent—someone to help us with member support and content development.

We're looking for someone who knows the world of travel hacking inside and out and has a passion for sharing their knowledge.

This is a part-time, remote position. I'll be your primary manager, but you'll also work with our other two owners, Chris and Stephanie , who are passionate travel hackers.

If this sounds interesting to you, Learn more and apply over here:

https://travelhacking.org/front-desk-agent/

If you know someone who might be a good fit, please forward.
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Tyler Tervooren

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As an introvert who loves to write, this system has helped me produce better writing faster and with less stress.
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Twenty-four days ago my friend, Scott Dinsmore, passed away near the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro—the same mountain I struggled on four years ago.

Scott was the larger-than-life founder of Live Your Legend, a community dedicated to helping people find and do the work they love. His accomplishments—and the lessons I’ve learned from his friendship for the five years I was blessed to have him in my life—are too many to list here.

In the days since his death, thousands have turned out to mourn and share their stories. [1]

I knew I would have to share mine, as well. Until today, though, I didn’t know how. Trying to eulogize someone like Scott would only make me look like a hack. I’ve tried (and failed) for weeks to find the words to do him justice. So, I’ll just share three stories from our too-short time together. Three stories that will tell you a little about who he was to me.

When I think about these stories, they inspire me to be a better person. I hope you find them useful.
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My dad: one of the most trustworthy people I’ve had the pleasure of knowing. When he says he’ll do something, I believe it. It’s easy because he makes simple promises that aren’t hard to deliver.

There’s one place, though, where he falters: fishing. My dad loves fishing. He’d go every day if he could and, now that he’s retired, he basically does. When I was young, he’d bring me along on his outings. We wouldn’t carry much—poles, some tackle, a few snacks. The promise was always the same: “We’ll stay out for two hours and, if we don’t catch anything, we’ll go home.”

After the first few outings, though, I all but knew that wasn’t true. Two hours would come and go and, despite my protests, Dad was sure a fish was coming in just a minute! 30 minutes later, there’d be a bite on the line (but no fish), and he’d get excited. “We’ll stay just a bit longer. We’ll have a fish any minute now!”

Just like Dad, I wanted a fish. But, unlike Dad, I was an impatient kid. Between the schedule delays and me being a grumpy kid, the result was usually a tantrum.

Trustworthy Dad would get excited and forget the schedule he promised. I’m 30 now and when Dad calls to ask, “Wanna go fishing?” I still have a mild panic attack. “Will I ever come home?!”

When you’re building a community, you’ll do anything to get the word out. The problem, though, is most important things don’t happen over night [1]. You can tell someone how important it is to exercise, but they won’t believe it—even if they want to—just because you said it. Belief comes from seeing promised results. Results take time. And giving up your time takes trust.

How do you build trust with your audience so they’ll stick with you for the long-term? Like this.
Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)To build an incredible audience, you have to build incredible tru…
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Founder of Riskology.co
Introduction
Mastering my psychology to become a better leader. Ran a marathon on every continent. Organized 3 world records. Introvert extraordinaire.
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  • Riskology.co
    Cheif Troublemaker, 2010 - present
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