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"The life of man upon earth is a warfare" (Job 7:1)
Image: Raphael, St. Michael, 1504-1505, fresco.
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Elias and the Widow: "So, then, this poor woman is a figure of the Gentiles, who were called to the faith. Let us study the circumstances of this prophetic event. The woman is a widow; she has no one to defend or protect her: she represents the Gentiles, who were abandoned by all, and had no one that could save them from the enemy of mankind. All the mother and her child have to live upon, is a handful of meal and a little oil: it is an image of the frightful dearth of truth, in which the pagans were living at the time when the Gospel was preached to them. Notwithstanding her extreme poverty, the widow of Sarephta receives the prophet with kindness and confidence; she believes what he tells her, and she and her child are saved: it is thus that the Gentiles welcomed the apostles, when these shook the dust from their feet and left the faithless Jerusalem. But what mean the two pieces of wood, which the widow holds in her hands? St. Augustine, St. Cesarius of Aries, and St. Isidore of Seville (who, after all, are but repeating what was the tradition of the early Church), tell us that this wood is a figure of the cross. With this wood the widow bakes the bread that is to support her; it is from the cross that the Gentiles receive life by Jesus, who is the living Bread. Whilst Israel dies of famine and drought, the Gentile Church feeds abundantly on the heavenly wheat, and on the oil, which is the symbol of strength and charity. Glory then be to Him who hath called us out of darkness into His marvellous light of faith! But let us tremble at witnessing the evils which the abuse of grace has brought upon a whole people. If God in His justice has not spared a whole nation, but cast it off; will He spare you or me, if we dare to resist His call?" ~ Dom Gueranger, The Liturgical Year.

Image: Jan Victors, Elijah and the Widow of Zarephath
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Is your marriageable young daughter sitting at home knitting on Saturday nights?  Or being asked by young men if she wants to "hang out"?  Stop the madness.  Listen as host Joshua Gunsher and guests Father Stephen McKenna and Justin Soeder discuss the Catholic ideal of courtship.
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Host Nicholas Wansbutter and guest Charles Coulombe return to the Crusader hero theme with this show on King Baldwin IV, the Leper King.
Following-up on last month's episode of Catholic History with Charles Coulombe, wherein we discussed the great crusader Godfrey to Bouillon, we continue with another Crusades-themed show. This month we discuss Baldwin IV, King of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, often called "the Leper King".
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Let's get back to root causes.  Root of the Rot with host Stephen Heiner and Bishop Daniel Dolan.  This episode covers the years between 1866 and 1905.
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Meditation is a step in the direction of contemplation.  Join host John Thomson and guest Fr. Bernard Uttley, O.S.B., in Part 3 of The Life of Prayer.
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"O Jesus, who in Thy bitter Passion didst become 'the most abject of men, a man of sorrows', I venerate Thy Sacred Face whereon there once did shine the beauty and sweetness of the Godhead; but now it has become for me as if it were the face of a leper! Nevertheless, under those disfigured features, I recognize Thy infinite Love and I am consumed with the desire to love Thee and make Thee loved by all men. The tears which well up abundantly in Thy sacred eyes appear to me as so many precious pearls that I love to gather up, in order to purchase the souls of poor sinners by means of their infinite value. O Jesus, whose adorable Face ravishes my heart, I implore Thee to fix deep within me Thy divine image and to set me on fire with Thy Love, that I may be found worthy to come to the contemplation of Thy glorious Face in Heaven. Amen. ~ St. Therese of the Child Jesus, Prayer to the Most Holy Face.

Image: Hans Memling, St. John and Veronica Diptych (right wing), oil on wood, 1483.

"Veronica, who consoled Christ on the road to Golgotha, is represented by Memling as a fashionably dressed lady of the fifteenth century. In her hands is the 'sudarium' or sweat cloth with the imprint of Christ's face. Behind stretches a poetic north European landscape of breathless calm.

"On the reverse the gold chalice with a serpent can be seen. It refers to the legend of St John the Evangelist.

"The left wing of the diptych representing St John the Evangelist is in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich." ~ Web Gallery of Art
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True Restoration

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He was known as "Il Prete Rosso," or The Red Priest, because of his flaming red hair. He was also renowned as a splendid teacher and a wondrous violinist, causing a German visitor to marvel, “It is hardly possible that anyone has ever played, or ever will play, in such an astounding fashion.” And he was celebrated for the magnificent variety and beauty of his compositions, which included hundreds of concertos; dozens of motets, oratorios, and mass settings; and more than 40 operas. He was Antonio Vivaldi and he was born on this date in 1678 in what was then still known as the Republic of Venice. Legend has it that Venice was rocked by an earthquake on the day of his birth, but it is historical fact that Vivaldi was ordained a priest at 25, taught and composed at an orphanage called the Devout Hospital of Mercy for thirty years, suffered from ill health most of his life, and on the strength of his music and his wizardry as a performer became one of the most popular composers in Europe, influencing even the great Johann Sebastian Bach. As he aged, however, jealous factions in Venice began to clamor for the latest fashions in music, and Vivaldi left his homeland for what he hoped would be greener pastures in Vienna. He died in the Austrian capital, in poverty, in 1741, aged 63. His funeral was held in St. Stephen’s Cathedral and among the mourners was a nine-year-old boy named Franz Joseph Haydn. - Martin, Sirius XM Symphony Hall
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"How many saints have, by reading a spiritual book, been induced to forsake the world and to give themselves to God! It is known to all that St. Augustine, when miserably chained by his passions and vices, was, by reading one of the epistles of St. Paul, enlightened with divine light, went forth from his darkness, and began to lead a life of holiness. Thus also St. Ignatius, while a soldier, by reading a volume of the lives of the saints which he accidentally took up, in order to get rid of the tediousness of the bed to which he was confined by sickness, was led to begin a life of sanctity, and became the Father and Founder of the Society of Jesus—an Order which has done so much for the Church. Thus also by reading a pious book accidentally and almost against his will, St. John Colombino left the world, became a saint, and the founder of another religious Order. St. Augustine relates that two courtiers of the Emperor Theodosius entered one day into a monastery of solitaries; one of them began to read the life of St. Anthony, which he found in one of the cells; so strong was the impression made upon him, that he resolved to take leave of the world. He then addressed his companion with so much fervor that both of them remained in the monastery to serve God. We read in the Chronicles of the Discalced Carmelites that a lady in Vienna was prepared to go to a festivity, but because it was given up she fell into a violent passion. To divert her attention she began to read a spiritual book that was at hand, and conceived such a contempt for the world, that she abandoned it and became a Teresian nun. The same happened to the Duchess of Montalto, in Sicily. She began also by accident to read the works of St. Teresa, and afterwards continued to read them with so much fervor, that she sought and obtained her husband’s consent to become a religious, and entered among the Discalced Carmelites." ~ St. Alphonsus Liguori, The Importance of Spiritual Reading.


Image: Marcantonio Bassetti, St. Antony Reading
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"O Fount of purity, most merciful Saviour, preserve us by the merits of this our fast. Behold us here prostrate before thee. Disdain not our uplifted hands, O thou the sovereign Lord of the angels, that didst stretch forth thy hands on thy cross for all mankind." ~ The Liturgical Year.

Image: Eugene Delacroix, Christ on the Cross, (Sketch), oil on wood, 1845
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Free episode of Escape from the Novus Ordo:  Join host Jason Guardiano and guest Fr. Michael Oswalt as they dismantle the Novus Ordo beast according to The Four Marks and find it wanting.  Sponsored by Novus Ordo Watch.
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Catholic Militancy! 
St. James the Moorslayer
(Santiago Matamoros)
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Have them in circles
33 people
Fermarc Heri Escueta's profile photo
Jean-Francois Mayer's profile photo
Faith in Texas's profile photo
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Ben Martin's profile photo
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Stephen Heiner's profile photo
Marc Voeffray's profile photo
A J MacDonald Jr's profile photo
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Commentary | Conversations | Conferences | Ceremonies | from the Traditional Catholic point of view
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Commentary | Conversations | Conferences | Ceremonies | from the Traditional Catholic point of view