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Trey Pitsenberger
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Lives in Northern California
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Trey Pitsenberger

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Oh My! "Silver bells and cockelshells" doesn't have quite the connotation I once thought it did.  The history behind those nursery rhymes. 

"Mary, Mary Quite Contrary may be about Bloody Mary, daughter of King Henry VIII and concerns the torture and murder of Protestants. Queen Mary was a staunch Catholic and her 'garden' here is an allusion to the graveyards which were filling with Protestant martyrs. The 'silver bells' were thumbscrews; while 'cockleshells' are believed to be instruments of torture which were attached to male genitals."

"Baa Baa Black Sheep is about the medieval wool tax, imposed in the 13th Century by King Edward I. Under the new rules, a third of the cost of a sack of wool went to him, another went to the church and the last to the farmer."

"Ring a Ring o Roses, or Ring Around the Rosie, may be about the 1665 Great Plague of London: the 'rosie' being the malodorous rash that developed on the skin of bubonic plague sufferers, the stench of which then needed concealing with a 'pocket full of posies'. The bubonic plague killed 15% of Britain’s population, hence 'atishoo, atishoo, we all fall down (dead).'”

#nurseryrhymes  
#history  
 
Plague, medieval taxes, religious persecution, prostitution: these are not exactly the topics that you expect to be immersed in as a new parent.
But probably right at this moment, mothers of small children around the world are mindlessly singing along to seemingly innocuous nursery rhymes that, if you dig a little deeper, reveal shockingly sinister backstories.
Babies falling from trees? Heads being chopped off in central London? Animals being cooked alive? Since when were these topics deemed appropriate to peddle to toddlers?

.....

So when modern parents expose their kids to vintage nursery rhymes they’re engaging with a centuries-old tradition that, on the surface at least, is not only harmless, but potentially beneficial.

But what about those twisted lyrics and dark back stories? To unpick the meanings behind the rhymes is to be thrust into a world not of sweet princesses and cute animals but of messy clerical politics, religious violence, sex, illness, murder, spies, traitors and the supernatural.

A random sample of 10 popular nursery rhymes shows this.
Goosey Goosey Gander may be about religious persecution, while Lucy Locket is about 18th Century prostitutes, writes Clemency Burton-Hill.
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Oh I love these, so interesting! 
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*Napoleon's bicorne hat from the battle of Waterloo - Deutsches Historisches Museum."

Today is the 200th anniversary of The Battle of Waterloo, which +Dirk Puehl has written about today. http://bit.ly/1IRIT9l

#waterloo  
#nepoleon  
#hat   
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Absolutely not! Forget about the mud stains from the battlefield - the rag doesn't even remotely look like a snail!
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Looks like the spring rush is over here at our garden center. Not surprisingly, as soon as school gets out for the summer, business slows down. We have accomplished a lot this spring, which explains my absence from Google+. We have started a small farm, where we grow and sell our fresh, organic vegetables, and herbs. We also moved our store to new, bigger digs. The store is right next door to the old store, but now has twice the room to operate. We have the space with the small picket fence. The store is about 700 sq, ft. The nursery covers just over an acre.  thegoldengecko.com
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Thanks +Kathryn Kure. It gets a bit hectic in spring and social media becomes more business based. Google + is more for me, and my interests, and now I have time to get back in the swing of things. 
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Yes, I can stay awhile!
Stone cabin in Alpe Pianlino in Montesinaro, Italy. Contributed by Davide Bernardi.
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I am the most illiterate Internet user on earth I was trying to get an email and found you totally cool oh yeah first I found the man saying his name was James Pitsenberger then you anyways its good to say hi uncle trey glad to hear your ok I love you!!
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Trey Pitsenberger

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"Andrei Petrovich Ryabushkin, a genius of capturing the contemplative boredom of everyday scenes". What a great term "Contemplative boredom" is. It seems we're afraid of boredom., though It's through boredom that we find out who we really are.  Our deepest selves lie in that "contemplative boredom". Great post!
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Sunshine, a nature reserve, 2 tons of amphibians and a rather petulant six-years old on the way home. It was all right, I think.
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Riding The El Dorado Trail

Monica and I took our vintage 1986 Specialized Rockhoppers out yesterday to the El Dorado Trail. The trail has paved and unpaved portions, and we took the unpaved section from Mother Lode Dr. In Shingle Springs to The El Dorado Y at Pleasant Valley Rd., a distance of 8 miles round trip. The trail roughly follows the old Southern Pacific railroad tracks, with most of it single track, and plenty of ups and downs. It's an intermediate ride that left both of us feeling spent, but satisfied. 

We bought our bikes new in 1986, the first year Specialized made The Rockhopper model. Very rare bikes these days, they were state of the art back then. Monica's had been hanging upside down for the last decade, and mine was being used by my brother-in-law during that time. A couple of months ago we re-acquired mine and brought Monica's off the hangers. It's fun to be back up on the bikes, and extra fun to be able to enjoy these classics still. 
Monica and I took our vintage 1986 Specialized Rockhoppers out yesterday to the El Dorado Trail. The trail has paved and unpaved portions, and we took the unpaved section from Mother Lode Dr. In Shingle Springs to The El Dorado Y at Pleasant Valley Rd., a distance of 8 miles round trip. The trail roughly follows the old Southern Pacific railroad tracks, with most of it single track, and plenty of ups and downs. It's an intermediate ride...
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A trail! That's it. Nice idea.
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What's going on in the sky tonight?

This part of California can get warm in the summer, so it's nice to fall asleep under the cool night sky. We have placed our summer sleeping quarters so as to view the stars. Last night there we're some very bright stars in the western sky right after sunset. Turns out two are planets, and one, Regulus, a star cluster about 70 light years away. Our moon is also making an appearance, directly below the three. It's a cool sight, and thanks to earthsky.org we found out what these mysterious lights are. 

My thinking is we (people in general) spend entirely too much time inside, under artificial lighting. We have lost contact with the nightly miracles directly above us. It's as if the most wonderful show to be found is right overhead, and we choose to spend it inside watching digital media. Now I realize that city folks don't have the same view we have in the mountains. People visiting from the city are always dumbstruck by the sheer number of lights in the sky. More reason to question why we need to live bathed in light day, and night.

If your interested in whats showing tonight in the sky check out http://earthsky.org/tonight. Good explanations of what's to be seen. Don't miss the extravaganza after sunset on June 19, 20 and 21, as the moon and the planets Venus and Jupiter light up the western sky.

#nightsky  
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+Armida Evony We reapply it after about 15 to 20 minutes. It's so botanical I have to problem just spraying it on my face, eyes closed. Once the two applications are applied we just use it again when we think the skeeters are getting too nosey again :-)
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"There's gold in them thar hills"

Now of course these are those hills, and yes they still find gold here. A customer wanted to show off this little piece he found. It's crystalline gold that weighs 1/4 oz. The value? 2400 USD. 

#gold  
#california  
#foothills  
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California heritage! 
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Comes with a view of the ocean! Be sure to check out the photo's of the inside.
Introducing the Solscape Earth Domes. These beautiful natural buildings are each less than 10 square meters, and sit overlooking the ocean in New Zealand.
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+Trey Pitsenberger​ has great taste, especially in exotic barbecue recipes +Patrick Bonneville​ :)
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This is a great article that address people's concerns about GMO's, and their food. I found the following two paragraphs from the article especially helpful.   
 
"If you want farmers to reduce pesticide use in general, start supporting smaller, ideally local farms that are up-front about what kinds of pesticides they use, when, and why. Plenty of large companies and industrial farms have met the requirements to slap a “USDA Certified Organic” label on their products, so look for signs of a commitment to sustainability, rather than just looking for an organic label."
 
"If you have space for a garden, or even a few containers, growing your own is a great way to make a dent in your food footprint. (Don’t forget to look around you for community gardens, too.) There’s a learning curve, but gardening can open your eyes to how food is really produced, and the real problems farmers struggle with: you’ll find yourself dealing with weeds, insect pests, and challenges to fertilizing."
 
hat tip: +Joseph Moosman
Everyone from Chipotle to the Food Babe rails against genetically modified ingredients, and laws to label GMO foods are making progress in some states. But the laser focus on GMOs is misguided, because most of the concerns people raise about them aren’t really about GMOs.
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+Kimberley Wilson alrightee..
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It's not the size of one's villa that makes a man, or woman. 
 
"When Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, known as Le Corbusier, was found dead in the sea off Cap Martin in the south of France, the local paper proclaimed that the architect was the worst-lodged tourist on the Côte d'Azur. This was true in some ways: in this land of swanky villas, the father of modern architecture spent summers in a wooden cabanon 12 feet square. The architect would have disagreed. "'I have a chateau on the Côte d'Azur …,'" he said. "'It's extravagant in comfort and gentleness.'"
Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, known as Le Corbusier, was found dead in the sea off Cap Martin in the south of France, the local paper proclaimed that the architect was the worst-lodged tourist on the Côte d'Azur
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This is a post I wrote about gardening during a drought.
Working at the nursery the other day I had a chance encounter with a group of young people who work for a state run organization. They are learning about the garden and how to grow food. They have started seeds, and came by to learn about the compost tea we make. Afterward I was told that just the other day the powers to be told them they cannot have a garden this year, due to the drought. I guess they will just have to buy their food f...
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+Armida Evony and that's why this time around seems different. So many people grow gardens for health, including mental health. We should not acquiesce our health and well being with the illusion that our small water usage makes us villains. 
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Work
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Self employed
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Horticulture, writing, and some other odds and ends.
Employment
  • Self
    Owner, present
    The botanical trades
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Male
Other names
Mr. Trey, Ice Trey
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Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit.
Introduction
Here is my web page.

I am a horticulturist by trade, and small garden shop owner. Enjoy writing, and have done so professionally for well over the last 20 years.  Excited about a wide range of subjects, and enjoy sharing with others.

I am willing to discuss religion from a historical point of view, I am not interested to hear people’s personal persuasions on god(s) or atheism. The same holds for politics. 


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I'm still here!
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Currently
Northern California
Previously
Belmont, CA - San Mateo, CA - Lakewood, CA
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530-919-9712
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4665 Marshall Rd.Garden Valley, CA 95633
Be sure to bring a sunshade, as there is little natural shade. Clean bathrooms, and parking are located right by the water. This is the closest public beach to Emerald Bay, so this where we launch our kayaks for the trip.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Just met Dan. Lot's of very cool posters from 60's forward. Enjoyed reminiscing, and getting the background on many of them.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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