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Trace Foundation
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Located just forty kilometers from Nepal, the town of Nyanang (also known as Nyalam) in southern Tibet has served as a historic, important site on the crossborder trade route between Tibet and Nepal. A native of Nyanang, Rinchen Dharlo draws from his exhaustive research on Nyanang to present an introduction to the region, its historic sites, including Milarepa’s meditation cave, and its unique people, culture, and traditions.

Rinchen Dharlo is a native of Nyanang in southern Tibet. For the past eighteen years he has served as President of Tibet Fund. Dharlo also cochaired the Tibetan-U.S. Resettlement Project, which successfully resettled 1,000 Tibetan refugees in twenty-one cities throughout the United States during 1992 and 1993. His book on his hometown of Nyanang was published by Amnye Machen Institute in 2009. 

This talk is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to info@latse.org to ensure a seat.

photograph by Simone Moro

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Discovered thirty years ago as a natural remedy, Yartsa Gunbu, a rare caterpillar fungus that is found only on the Tibetan Plateau, has became a boon to Tibetan nomads. Today, some nomadic Tibetans bring in as much as 80 percent of their income from its harvest, but is it changing their lives for the better? 

Join us for the first film of our Fall Film Series as we screen this documentary from visionary director Dorje Tsering Chenaktsang, which follows an elder in the Amdo region on an 800-mile journey to collect the worms.

In Tibetan with English subtitles. 101 min.

ཀུན་ཕན་ཐེབས་རྩའི་སྟོན་དུས་གྱི་གློག་བརྙན་ལས་རིམ་ནང་ལ། ཐེངས་འདིར་རྣམ་དཔྱོད་ཤིན་དུ་ཡངས་བའི་གློག་བརྙན་ཁྲབ་འཁྲིད་པ་ཞིག་གིས་བཟོས་པའི་དབྱར་རྩ་དགུན་འབུའི་སྐོར་གྱི་དངོས་འབྱུང་གློག་བརྙན་དེ་གཟིགས་འབུལ་ཞུ་རྒྱུ་ཡིན།

དབྱར་རྩ་རིན་པོ་ཆེ། 

ལོ་ངོ་སུམ་བཅུའི་གོང་ལ་ཁྱབ་སྤེལ་ཆེན་པོ་བྱུང་བའི་རང་འབྱུང་གི་སྨན་རྩ་དབྱར་རྩ་དགུན་འབུ་ནི་བོད་མཐོ་སྒང་གཅིག་པུ་ནས་འཐོན་བཞིན་ཡོད། དེས་བོད་ཀྱི་འབྲོག་པ་རྣམས་ལ་ཡོང་འབབ་ཆེན་པོ་ཞིག་སྐྲུན་པ་སྟེ། འབྲོག་པ་འགའ་ཤས་ཀྱི་ལོ་གཅིག་གི་ཡོང་འབབ་ཀྱི་བརྒྱ་ཆ་༨༠ལྷག་ཟིན་གྱི་ཡོད། འོན་ཀྱང་དེས་ཁོང་ཚོའི་མདུན་ལམ་ཕན་ཐོགས་ཇི་ཡོད་ཤོད་དཀའ། 

ངེད་ཚོའི་སྟོན་དུས་ཀྱི་གློག་བརྙན་ལས་རིམ་ཀྱི་གློག་བརྙན་དང་པོ་སྟེ། རྣམ་དཔྱོད་ཡངས་བའི་གློག་བརྙན་བཟོ་མཁན་ལྕེ་ནག་ཚང་རྡོ་རྗེ་ཚེ་རིང་གིས་བཟོས་པའི་གློག་བརྙན་དེ་གཟིགས་པར་ཕེབས་རོགས། གློག་བརྙན་དེས་ཨ་མདོའི་རྒན་རབས་པ་ཞིག་མཉམ་དུ་མེ་ལེ་༨༠༠ལྷག་གྱི་ལམ་བགྲོད་ནས་དབྱར་རྩ་དགུན་འབུ་འགོག་པའི་གོ་རིམ་བསྟན་ཡོད། 

གློག་བརྙན་དེ་བོད་སྐད་ནང་ལ་བཟོས་ཡོད་པ་དང་མདུན་ལ་དབྱིན་ཡིག་གི་ཡིག་སྒྱུར་ཡོད། གློག་བརྙན་གྱི་དུས་ཡུན་སྐར་མ་༡༠༡ཡིན། 

ཟླ་བ་9ཚེས་17 རེས་གཟའ་ཕུར་བུ། ཆུ་ཚོད། 6:30-8:15

པ་སེའི་རིན་པ། སྒོར་༡༠

སློབ་མ། སྒོར་༥

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Don't know much about Tibetan history? Join us this fall for a series of talks with historian and leading Tibetan Studies scholar Elliot Sperling. Drawing from his extensive knowledge on Tibetan history and Sino-Tibetan relations, he will explore the rich legacy of Tibetan history and civilization from antiquity to modern times.

This talk series is free and intended for all audiences. Seating is limited, so please RSVP by September 11 to reserve a spot for the first session: events@trace.org.

Elliot Sperling is former chair of the Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a faculty member in that department's Tibetan Studies Program since 1987. In addition to his scholarly writing on Tibetan history, his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Far Eastern Economic Review, among others.

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Don't know much about Tibetan history? Join us this fall for a series of talks with historian and leading Tibetan Studies scholar Elliot Sperling. Drawing from his extensive knowledge on Tibetan history and Sino-Tibetan relations, he will explore the rich legacy of Tibetan history and civilization from antiquity to modern times.

This talk series is free and intended for all audiences. Seating is limited, so please RSVP by September 11 to reserve a spot for the first session: events@trace.org.

Elliot Sperling is former chair of the Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a faculty member in that department's Tibetan Studies Program since 1987. In addition to his scholarly writing on Tibetan history, his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Far Eastern Economic Review, among others.

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Don't know much about Tibetan history? Join us this fall for a series of talks with historian and leading Tibetan Studies scholar Elliot Sperling. Drawing from his extensive knowledge on Tibetan history and Sino-Tibetan relations, he will explore the rich legacy of Tibetan history and civilization from antiquity to modern times.

This talk series is free and intended for all audiences. Seating is limited, so please RSVP by September 11 to reserve a spot for the first session: events@trace.org.

Elliot Sperling is former chair of the Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a faculty member in that department's Tibetan Studies Program since 1987. In addition to his scholarly writing on Tibetan history, his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Far Eastern Economic Review, among others.

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Don't know much about Tibetan history? Join us this fall for a series of talks with historian and leading Tibetan Studies scholar Elliot Sperling. Drawing from his extensive knowledge on Tibetan history and Sino-Tibetan relations, he will explore the rich legacy of Tibetan history and civilization from antiquity to modern times.

This talk series is free and intended for all audiences. Seating is limited, so please RSVP by September 11 to reserve a spot for the first session: events@trace.org.

Elliot Sperling is former chair of the Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a faculty member in that department's Tibetan Studies Program since 1987. In addition to his scholarly writing on Tibetan history, his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Far Eastern Economic Review, among others.

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Don't know much about Tibetan history? Join us this fall for a series of talks with historian and leading Tibetan Studies scholar Elliot Sperling. Drawing from his extensive knowledge on Tibetan history and Sino-Tibetan relations, he will explore the rich legacy of Tibetan history and civilization from antiquity to modern times.

This talk series is free and intended for all audiences. Seating is limited, so please RSVP by September 11 to reserve a spot for the first session: events@trace.org.

Elliot Sperling is former chair of the Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and a faculty member in that department's Tibetan Studies Program since 1987. In addition to his scholarly writing on Tibetan history, his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Far Eastern Economic Review, among others.

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It's Yartsa Gunbu season! Do you know about Tibet's golden worm? 

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Tibetan Food Fridays, exploring the world of Tibetan cuisine and food culture.
This week: ཀྲི་མོག་མོག tri momo
What's for breakfast? Warm tri momo, the Tibetan steamed bread made with yeast. A plain bun, which is sometimes flavored with ema (Sichuan peppercorn), it serves as an accommodating companion to spicy dishes, but also to morning porridge. We take ours with a touch of chili sauce for a simple yet comforting breakfast!

Do you have suggestions for Food Fridays? Send us a message or post in the comments.
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Representing 30 emerging and established artists from the Tibetan Plateau and around the world, Transcending Tibet is a landmark exhibit of newly commissioned work. 

Mining the visual and material history of both Tibet and the modern world – reappropriating iconography, playing boldly with everything from acrylic and oil to mirrors illuminated with LEDs – these artists offer a varied and nuanced look at Tibetan identity and culture today.

OPENING RECEPTION
Saturday, March 14at 3:00pm - 8:30pm

EXHIBITION HOURS
March 14 – April 12; Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays: 11 am – 6 pm; Thursdays: 12 pm – 8 pm; or by appointment
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