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Townsend Treatment Centers
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Have them in circles
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800-760-8561
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888-694-7225
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It's not rehab. It's Townsend.
Introduction
The Townsend Way uses innovative medical treatment for the disease of addiction. With medical detox and stabilization on an outpatient basis, our program is more compatible with the schedules of busy students, parents, and professionals in the Louisiana area. Treatment programs are available for patients with substance and alcohol abuse, sex addiction, overeating, gambling addiction, and other kinds of destructive behavior. In addition to cognitive and genetic testing, we provide group therapy, ongoing disease management, and education services.

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"It's good being able to live openly and honestly and not worry about hiding things, or you know the shady types of behavior that I did in addiction” - Kevin

Today we are proud to share with you the 10th episode of Far From Finished! In this episode, Kevin talks about how his recovery has been a blessing — helping him, his family and also his career.

Listen to Kevin's recovery story by clicking on the link below.
Far From Finished Latest Episode In Episode 10 of Far From Finished, Kevin talks about how his recovery has been a blessing …
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"According to Dr. Howard Wetsman, the biggest problem in addiction medicine is the fact that society doesn’t differentiate between substance abuse and addiction, even though they are two very different things. Wetsman explains that substance abuse is a normal brain doing stupid things with drugs and alcohol, while addiction is an ill brain trying to feel normal."

Read more from this piece by New Orleans Magazine on Dr. Wetsman, chief medical officer at Townsend on getting patients to understand addiction.
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Townsend offers physician supported addiction treatment in an outpatient setting. We are a true alternative to inpatient treatment, giving you the opportunity to recover from addiction without leaving your family or job. Our unique model of treatment delivers the highest quality of services and makes treatment more effective and affordable than other alternatives.

Read below our Patient Q&A below
Townsend offers physician supported addiction treatment in an outpatient setting. We are a true alternative to inpatient treatment, giving you the opportunity to recover from addiction without leaving your family or job. Our unique model of treatment delivers the highest quality of services and ...
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"There are two main elements of addiction no matter what drug or behavior the person is using in the illness: the lack of control when using and the inability to stay stopped when not using" -- Dr. Howard Wetsman, Chief Medical Officer of Townsend.

Please watch the video below as Dr.  Wetsman will share further insight on these two elements of addiction.
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“I can love now, I can feel things, all emotions good and bad, I’m not numb. The bad ones come and they go but the positive attitude is incredible.” -- Scott

This week we are proud to share with you a brand new episode of Far From Finished. In this episode Scott talks about his 20 year career as a firefighter, the drug addiction that overtook him due to his PTSD and the treatment he underwent to achieve the peace that he deserves.

Please listen to Scott's remarkable story by clicking on the link below.
Far From Finished Latest Episode In this episode Scott, talks about his 20 year career as a firefighter, the drug addiction that …
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There’s an App for That: Suboxone Users Get Support through New Mobile App

Suboxone has been touted as a medication that is flexible and effective in helping people with low-dose opiate addictions to stop using heroin and start working through the issues underlying addiction behaviors. Its flexibility comes from the fact that it can be prescribed from a doctor’s office, provided that the doctor is certified and legally able to hand out prescriptions. Its effectiveness is based in the fact that it can be taken at home, and it immediately serves as a “replacement” drug for heroin or other opiate drugs, allowing the person to stop using all substances of abuse and focus on therapeutic growth in recovery.

But Suboxone is only effective if it is used regularly. One study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment in 2014 found that young adults between the ages of 18 and 25 are more likely to relapse when in treatment for opiate addiction using buprenorphine (e.g., Subutex, Suboxone). The study found that 17 percent of adults in this age group were still actively in treatment after one year as compared to 45 percent of older adults. In fact, many young adults in treatment with buprenorphine relapsed within the first three months.

In an attempt to mitigate this issue and help young people stay more engaged with their recovery when taking Suboxone, Dr. Zev Schuman-Olivier created MySafeRx, an app designed to help ensure that young people taking buprenorphine never miss a dose. Key aspects of the app include:

- Convenience of an app
- Secure connection to a Medicasafe pill dispenser
- Connection with a mobile recovery coach via videoconference for a check-in each day (check-in required for pill release)
- Unique code for pill release provided by recovery coach after check-in
- Status update sent to prescriber by recovery coach

The connection to the recovery coach each day is a key component of the app’s efficacy, says Schuman-Olivier: “The empathy from another person can be very helpful in recovery, but it would be too expensive and time-consuming to have a person drive to the patient’s house every morning.”

The app is still in its trial phase, but the hope is that it will soon be available for use on a wide scale. Especially during the first few months of recovery, the extra support and personal connection can play a critical role in helping everyone in early recovery to remain accountable and positive as they learn new habits to sustain a sober life.

Says Schuman-Olivier: “If we can do something to help people adhere to buprenorphine treatment during the high-risk time of early recovery and get to abstinence even for a month or two, it gives them a chance to get a hold over the power of opiate addiction and get a good foothold in recovery. With nearly half of all adults dropping out of buprenorphine treatment within a year, this really has the potential to provide the extra level of support that is needed during high-risk periods of treatment.”

Would you be interested in using an app like MySafeRx to manage your recovery with or without the use of medication?
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Have them in circles
301 people
Alcohol & Drug Rehab Helpline's profile photo
Alcohol & Drug Rehab Helpline's profile photo
gee Towns's profile photo
Alcoholism and Drug Detox Help's profile photo
Alcohol & Drug Rehab Helpline's profile photo
Alcoholism and Drug Detox Help's profile photo
Alcohol & Drug Rehab Helpline's profile photo
First Step Sober Living's profile photo
Christian Alcohol and Drug Rehab Help's profile photo
 
Please show your support and help those who have been affected by the flooding in Louisiana.
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“It’s been so long since I felt myself in my own skin. It's cool watching my personality come back, my energy come back, my confidence come back. You know, it's all come back, it's a great thing." -- Justin

Today we share with you a brand new episode of Far From Finished. In Episode Eight, Justin talks about the long process he underwent to achieve sobriety and the sober community that has changed his life for the better.

Listen to Justin's recovery story by clicking on the link below.
Far From Finished Latest Episode In Episode Eight of Far From Finished, Justin talks about the long process he underwent to achieve …
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Can a Fitbit Combat Alcoholism?

Fitbits are a popular tool for tracking steps and other health data throughout the day with the goal of managing a healthy weight. But a new study has recently asked the question: Can a Fitbit help you to stay clean and sober too?

Because Fitbits are a popular exercise tool among women, the study’s focus is on whether or not use of the tool – and a focus on exercise – can be helpful during recovery. The idea is that a constant reminder of the goal of living a healthy lifestyle (the Fitbit is worn on the wrist and programmed to signal when certain step goals are met) may also serve as a constant reminder of the goal of staying clean and sober.

In an effort to answer that question definitively, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) spent more than $200,000 giving women who struggle with alcoholism and depression Fitbits for the purposes of a study designed to ascertain whether or not the devices can assist people in staying sober.

The grant for the project states: “Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are the [third] leading preventable cause of death in the US and are associated with significant economic burden and health-related negative consequences. While women may be less likely to develop AUDs, they experience more significant negative health consequences of alcohol use than men. Due to stigma, shame, and childcare issues, women are less likely to receive specialty addiction treatment.”

Women and Men

Though both women and men may benefit from the use of Fitbits or other exercise monitoring/encouragement tools as they begin the process of stabilizing in sobriety, there are a number of gender differences that have been noticed by researchers that suggest that Fitbits may be uniquely suited to women in recovery. For example, women may be more likely than men to turn to alcohol as a means of managing emotional problems, like depression, frustration, anger, or anxiety. When they stop drinking, it becomes imperative to learn healthier coping mechanisms – like exercise.

In the grant, it is cited that: “Relapse rates are very high in both men and women but significant gender differences emerge in the predictors of relapse. Women are more likely to relapse in unpleasant, negative emotional states … more so than men, women with AUDs report drinking to cope with negative emotions.”

In addition to use of the Fitbits, women in the study will also receive weekly check-in emails to support them in their process.

Healthy Lifestyle Changes

When alcohol and other substances are used as a means to manage emotional ups and downs, the incorporation of positive lifestyle changes are a key factor in long-term recovery. The use of a Fitbit, or any app or device that provides ongoing and frequent daily reminders of recovery goals and encouragement for positive choices, can be helpful in managing sobriety if it serves to assist the person in creating new, healthy habits.

How has exercise impacted your recovery?
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Teen Drug Use Linked to Childhood Trauma, Abuse

A recent study from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found a link between trauma experienced during childhood and drug use during adolescence. Specifically, data from a sample of 10,000 teens across the country showed that being exposed to domestic violence and abuse during childhood increased the likelihood that the child would later use drugs, independent of any mental health issues.

The study was recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and is the first of its kind. While this does not mean that a child who experienced trauma or abuse before the age of 11 will automatically experiment with drugs during the teen years, this fact can help parents and caregivers as well as teachers and physicians to remain alert to potential signs of drug use.

Trauma

It is not just physical or sexual abuse – either being the victim of such trauma or witnessing it happen to someone else – that may contribute to an increased risk of teen drug abuse. According to the study, a number of different traumatic events may be linked to higher likelihood of use of cocaine, marijuana, prescription drugs (without a prescription), and other substances.

Hannah Carliner is a postdoctoral fellow and one of the lead researchers on the study. She said: "Abuse and domestic violence were particularly harmful to children, increasing the chances of all types of drug use in the adolescent years. We also found that trauma such as car accidents, natural disasters, and major illness in childhood increased the chances that teens would use marijuana, cocaine, and prescription drugs."

Parental Drug Abuse as Trauma

Additionally, the drug use and abuse of a parent can add to the likelihood that a child who experienced a childhood trauma will ultimately use marijuana and other substances during the teen years, according to the study.

Associate Professor Silvia S. Martins, MD, PhD, is another lead author of the study. She says: "Parent substance misuse may increase access to drugs in the home, indicate a biological predisposition towards drug use, serve as a model for coping with stress, or indicate lack of parental involvement or neglect. Future research should identify which mechanisms may increase this risk in order to target interventions."

Taking Action

Though the goal is to raise a child free from exposure to abuse and trauma, it is impossible to keep them in a bubble and guarantee a stress-free childhood. However, parents and caregivers, as well as teachers and family doctors, can all work together to identify signs of drug use in children with known histories of trauma – the earlier, the better. The key is to maintain open communication, be aware of signs of drug use, notice any changes in personality and behavior, and immediately act if there is suspicion that the child is beginning to experiment with drugs and alcohol. No use of these substances is safe, and the sooner that a young person who is drinking or getting high gets back on the sober track, the less likely it is that a lifelong substance use disorder will develop.
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Top 5 Tips for Parents in Recovery

It is easy to get caught up in the details in early recovery. Legal requirements, 12-Step meeting schedules, therapy sessions, medication management, and more can fill up the hours and become the major focus. For parents in recovery, this can be a good thing because it means a steadfast commitment to remaining sober, a choice that will benefit not only them but their children as well. But it can also indicate a lack of focus on individual relationships with children, which can cause problems for the parent and the child.

July 24 is National Parents Day, and a great day for parents in recovery to pause and take an honest look at how things are going at home. There are a number of ways to improve relationships with your children and to be a positive parent. Here are just a few to get you started:

Take care of yourself. If you are not feeling strong and safe in recovery, how can you be expected to make a child feel strong and safe? Taking care of yourself and prioritizing your recovery is goal number one, because when you are stable in your life, you can be a stable part of your child’s life.

Create a community for you and your children. Isolation can be a killer in recovery, both for the individual and for the whole family. Reach out and connect with community centers, a religious organization, the local playground, sports teams, and other activities that are fun for kids and that will expose them to others who are living healthy, positive lives.

Lighten up. You may want to have lots of “heart-to-heart” talks about the past, or try and discern what damage has been done to your child through therapy and other interventions, and certainly, there is a place for this as you both recover. But don’t forget that childhood is supposed to be a fun time, and making an effort to have fun with your child is part of the process of creating a positive new life for both of you.

Stay positive. Kids make mistakes. Make sure you spend more time focusing on the positive choices they make than the not-so-positive choices.

Don’t argue. When your child expresses negative opinions about you, the past, drug use, or anything else, accept those feelings and validate them without argument.

Parents play a critical role in the ability of their children to heal after addiction. The more positive, involved, and supportive the parents are, the more likely it is that children will be able to sidestep the genetic predisposition to addiction themselves.

Though it may feel like you have lost credibility or that your children do not trust you, the fact is that as a parent, you have the ability to have a positive impact no matter what has happened in the past. It can take time to heal and move forward – both for you and your child – but with persistence and patience, like everything in recovery, it will get better.
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Proud to share with you a brand new episode of Far From Finished.

Please listen to Episode 5, Traci's story below.
 
"I learned something in recovery, and there's only one thing, that you have to change, and that's everything. You've got to be honest to yourself. It helps if you're honest to at least one other person, to get that stuff out." — Traci

This week we shared with you a brand new episode of Far From Finished. In episode five, Traci talks about how looking for acceptance from others first led to her drug abuse, and how she learned to accept and be confident in herself to stop it.

Listen to episode 5 of Far From Finished by clicking on the link below.
Far From Finished Latest Episode In this episode, Traci talks about how looking for acceptance from others lead to her drug abuse, …
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