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Tomas Haley-Ohrt
Lives in Vancouver, Canada
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Tomas Haley-Ohrt

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Like apparently everyone else, I also have false memories of the alternate Universe E. This blog (and its followup post in the P.S.) is really bizarre.
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Tomas Haley-Ohrt

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Irresponsible or unavoidable borrowing?

Growing up in Europe, I didn't pay much attention to the construction of the Euro, and whatever little I remember has nothing to do with the economics of it. Now, older, having lived in the US for a while, with a Greek wife, I'm looking at the way the Euro is unraveling and I've been using the opportunity to try to figure out how it works (or, rather, why it doesn't).

The core mechanism that allows multiple states to share the same currency is pretty simple: since the weaker states can't devalue their currency to compensate for their trade deficit with the stronger ones, money has to flow from the stronger economies to the weaker ones in order to maintain the balance.

We see that in the US: as measured in GDP per capita, there's about a 2:1 ratio between the strongest states and the weakest ones. To compensate for that, a lot of money flows between states, through the federal government. Most taxes in the US are federal taxes, i.e. about 75%, and the federal government doesn't necessarily spend the money it collects in the exact states where it collects them. As an example, every year about 130 billion dollars paid by California in federal taxes don't make it back into California. Texas and New York are the two other states that have a negative balance of more than 100 billion each. For those 3 states, that outflow on money represents 5.7%, 7.2% and 7.4% of their respective GDPs. California is literally sending money to other states so that those states can buy California stuff. The same is true for Texas, New York, and about 20 of the 50 states that are sending money to the other 30.

Looking back in history, the Marshall Plan followed a somewhat similar logic: the US sent aid to Europe, to allow Europeans to buy US goods, which was both a stabilizing mechanism for European currencies that otherwise were in a devaluation spiral, and an outlet for the huge US industrial production. For reference, the Marshall Plan amounted to 120 billion dollars (in today's dollars) over 4 years, which is tiny compared to the amount of money that the federal government now redistributes across state lines.

We can compare that to the situation in the Eurozone/EU, where the GDP per capita varies by a factor of about 2.3:1. Germany's balance in the EU budget is negative by less than 9 billion Euros. France's and Italy's follow at approximately 6.5 billion and 6 billion. Germany's 9 billion Euros is tiny compared to California's 130 billion dollars, especially since Germany's GDP is 60% larger than that of California. Since the US and EU economies have approximately the same size, that's a reasonably apples-to-apples comparison. The biggest negative balance that a Eurozone country has with the EU is about 0.41% of its GDP. The biggest positive balance is 1.3%. Within the US, only 4 states out of 50 fall within that range.

That's the problem right there: Germany is not flowing enough money out to other Eurozone countries to compensate for its own very strong economy. That's true of other rich European countries as well, e.g. Netherlands, Austria, France.

From the Greek point of view, the only way to get that money to flow in order to maintain balance had been for the government to borrow. That wasn't irresponsible borrowing. That was mechanical, predictable. Greece's poor historical discipline around government finances only accelerated an unavoidable process, but it's not a root cause.

In fact, predictably, pushing Greece into austerity made things worse, much worse: with the root cause being Greece's relatively weak economy compared to the rest of the Eurozone, an austerity approach can only put Greece in a position where it needs even more money to flow in in order to maintain balance.

Even if we assume that all of Greece's debts get somehow forgiven with no further constraints and that Greece manages to run a balanced government budget, it would still be in an unsustainable position in the current Eurozone as its weaker economy would force additional money to flow in. Unless the Eurozone very significantly increases the amount of money that it redistributes across borders, Greece should get out of the Euro at the first opportunity, i.e. literally Monday morning, July 6.

Worse, with Greece out, it's only a matter of time for another weak country to find itself in the same position: that might be Portugal, Spain, Italy, or if Bulgaria, Romania or even Hungary join quickly enough that might go through that same death spiral quickly enough to see the Eurozone as a revolving door, with barely enough time to come in before being back out.

Once that first batch of weak countries is out, there'll always be more that'll be at the bottom of the scale and will find themselves in the same position. France is comfortably in the middle of the pack within Europe today, but attrition will eventually push it toward the bottom, and France having to leave the Euro is a true nightmare scenario for everyone.

In order for the Eurozone to survive, its rich members will need to send a lot more money to the poorer ones: the rich ones literally can't continue reaping benefits from a currency based on the European average without sharing those benefits with the poorer ones that bring that European average down. Otherwise, the Euro will consume country after country until it hits a country that is literally too big to fail.
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Tomas Haley-Ohrt

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"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
With a bit of UV and oxygen, solid objects emerge from a shallow liquid bath.
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Hey Nina... funny the day after Tomas posted this I got an email from Popular Mechanics about the same article. 
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This is possibly the most fascinating video I've seen in years. This is an ORIGINAL THOUGHT; you've never seen this talked about before. Pretty much every big problem with modern society—rise of income inequality, rise in incarceration rates, failures in the economy, lack of trust in government, skyrocketing of debt, etc. ... all of this can be traced back to one very silly decision made on October 26, 1970.

And even more unbelievable, this core flaw in government (that no one has ever even mentioned before) is actually trivial to fix.

Seriously, everyone should watch this video. Don't worry that it's an hour long—it's really only half that, because the second half of the video is just evidence supporting the first half. 
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James this is going to win you a Nobel Prize. So good.
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Tomas Haley-Ohrt

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Easily the most ridiculous, fattening cake we've ever made. It's a monstrosity. =D
The bottom layer is lemon. The middle layer is chocolate ganache. The top is cream cheese icing.
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Great globs of yummieness
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It's amazing that film editing works, because it's so disruptive to the visual information coming into the brain, says Jeffrey Zacks, a neuroscientist at Washington University in St. Louis. On the other hand, Zacks says, our brains do quite a bit of editing of their own---and we're every bit as oblivious to that as we are to the film editor's cuts.
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...Yikes.

Time to move...?
 
One of the most terrifying things I've ever read. Mother Nature is scary. Very scary.

It's a long read but just trust me on this and read it through. 
The next full-margin rupture of the Cascadia subduction zone will spell the worst natural disaster in the history of the continent. Credit Illustration by Christoph Niemann; Map by Ziggymaj / Getty
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The good news is that at least one time there was 1000 years between quakes. So...?
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A Smart Oven that can take selfies of your food.

At first I thought it was a joke. Then I watched the video and realized that it's actually really, really cool.
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It's been months since the "GamerGate" thing happened, and up until now I haven't had a single clue what it's been about. It sounded like it's a big deal, as pretty much all gaming sites have been overtaken by it and I've also seen tons of articles about it from real news sites, but pretty much every article has been about how much the two sides hate each other rather than what they're actually arguing about. So, I finally did some research, looking for some balanced articles to explain things to me.

Pro-GamerGate: http://techcrunch.com/2014/09/25/gamergate-an-issue-with-2-sides/

Anti-GamerGate: http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2014/09/08/videogames-are-for-everybody/

Conclusion: It's a complete mess that I'm glad I've been ignoring up until now. Especially now that it's gotten utterly ridiculous: http://techcrunch.com/2014/10/19/adios-gamergate/

There was an amusing comment in another article. Apparently, to some extent the GamerGate side has actually been "winning", in that they've had success in convincing advertisers to pull their ads from sites that disagree with them.

As someone snarkily commented: that's because hardcore gamers are, in fact, really used to winning.
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Admittedly, the sea lion cartoon might be my favorite part of the article, but the rest is good too.
 
From mere faux pas to outright harassment, Twitter increasingly acts as a pressure cooker for the worst of humanity. Longtime literary troll Ed Champion was finally suspended from Twitter last month after trying to blackmail a writer in real time. The death of Brenda Leyland, the “Twitter troll” who harassed...
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Tomas Haley-Ohrt

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I jokingly edited an author's page five and a half years ago. Today, it's still there, and cited by numerous well-respected sources. 
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