Profile

Cover photo
Blue Tyson
Works at Freelance
1,887 followers|3,442,928 views
AboutPostsReviews

Stream

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The People of Pembrooktonshire - Resources (Lamentations of the Flame Princess)
I ran a campaign where the player characters started out in the messed up town of Pembrooktonshire.  I believe that we spent about 17 sessions in that horrible place but I would have loved to played more sessions there.  A great time was had by all, but eve...
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
75 Years Ago This Month: Captain Marvel faces the Circus of Death in Whiz Comics #6 (http://www.comics.org/issue/887/), cover by C.C. Beck!

Whiz Comics in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/series/189/covers/
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
#rollforinitiative  (The gif is animated, if you click through to imgur, it's even freakier when the camera scrolls down)
The Internet's visual storytelling community. Explore, share, and discuss the best visual stories the Internet has to offer.
3 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Proud to announce that EASY INNOCENCE is a #featured read on #Wattpad. Take a #read https://www.wattpad.com/discover
Discover Stories. Read books and stories free on Wattpad. Choose from millions of titles about romance, fanfiction, fantasy, science fiction, non fiction, teen fiction, and more. Sign up with Facebook. OR. Username Email Password. Featured in Romance. Loading ... Featured in Fanfiction ...
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Euler's Identity is a remarkable equation that comprises the five most important mathematical constants.
Euler's Identity is a remarkable equation that comprises the five most important mathematical constants.
5 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Penguin RandomHouse has announced that Ursula K. Le Guin's classic novel THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS will be available in ebook for the very first time.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
7
2
Bevan Anderson's profile photoBill Vee's profile photo
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
British astronomers say they've detected five giant black holes that had previously been obscured by dust and gas.

The high-energy X-rays they emit were picked up by NASA's powerful NuSTAR space telescope.

Scientists say this discovery means there may be millions more black holes than originally thought across the universe.

The World Today | http://ab.co/1RhEi7U
5 comments on original post
1
Jeff Rients's profile photo
 
Are they sure it's not five bits of dust on the lens?
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Chaos made simple

This shows a lot of tiny particles moving around.   If you were one of these particles, it would be hard to predict where you'd go.  See why?  It's because each time you approach the crossing, it's hard to tell whether you'll go into the left loop or the right one. 

You can predict which way you'll go: it's not random.  But to predict it, you need to know your position quite accurately.  And each time you go around, it gets worse.  You'd need to know your position extremely accurately to predict which way you go - left or right - after a dozen round trips. 

This effect is called deterministic chaos.  Deterministic chaos happens when something is so sensitive to small changes in conditions that its motion is very hard to predict in practice, even though it's not actually random.

This particular example of deterministic chaos is one of the first and most famous.  It's the Lorenz attractor, invented by Edward Lorenz as a very simplified model of the weather in 1963.

The equations for the Lorentz attractor are not very complicated if you know calculus.  They say how the x, y and z coordinates of a point change with time:

dx/dt = 10(x-y)
dy/dt = x(28-z) - y
dz/dt = xy - 8z/3

You are not supposed to be able to look at these equations and say "Ah yes!  I see why these give chaos!"   Don't worry: if you get nothing out of these equations, it doesn't mean you're "not a math person"  - just as not being able to easily paint the Mona Lisa doesn't mean you're "not an art person".  Lorenz had to solve them using a computer to discover chaos.  I personally have no intuition as to why they work... though I could get such intuition if I spent a week reading about it.

The weird numbers here are adjustable, but these choices are the ones Lorenz originally used.  I don't know what choices David Szakaly used in his animation.  Can you find out?

If you imagine a tiny drop of water flowing around as shown in this picture, each time it goes around it will get stretched in one direction.  It will get squashed in another direction, and be neither squashed nor stretched in a third direction. 

The stretching is what causes the unpredictability: small changes in the initial position will get amplified.  I believe the squashing is what keeps the two loops in this picture quite flat.  Particles moving around these loops are strongly attracted to move along a flat 'conveyor belt'.  That's why it's called the Lorentz attractor.

With the particular equations I wrote down, the drop will get stretched in one direction by a factor of about 2.47... but squashed in another direction by a factor of about 2 million!    At least that's what this physicist at the University of Wisconsin says:

J. C. Sprott, Lyapunov exponent and dimension of the Lorenz attractor
http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/chaos/lorenzle.htm

He has software for calculating these numbers - or more precisely their logarithms, which are called Lyapunov exponents.  He gets 0.906, 0, and -14.572 for the Lyapunov exponents.

For more nice animations of the Lorentz attractor, see:

http://visualizingmath.tumblr.com/post/121710431091/a-sample-solution-in-the-lorenz-attractor-when

David Szakaly has a blog called dvdp full of astounding images:

http://dvdp.tumblr.com/

and presumably this one of the Lorenz attractor is buried in there somewhere, though I'm feeling too lazy to do an image search and find it.
24 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Europa and Lovecraft: if there is a sea of liquid water under Europa’s crust, is there life as well?

We have learned so much about this strange moon since Lovecraft’s time and hopefully we will soon know more. Detecting even the smallest microbe in the Europan seas would fundamentally change our view of ourselves relative to the rest of the universe.…
We have learned so much about this strange moon since Lovecraft’s time and hopefully we will soon know more. Detecting even the smallest microbe in the Europan seas would fundamentally change our v...
View original post
3
Tony Demetriou's profile photo
 
Haven't we already found asteroids with evidence of bacteria?
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Blue Tyson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The new issue of Asimov's includes fiction by Kelly Robson, Paul McAuley, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, and more
The new issue of Asimov's includes fiction by Kelly Robson, Paul McAuley, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, and more
1 comment on original post
1
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
Crossover Geek
Bragging rights
Have read a LOT
Work
Occupation
Analyst
Skills
FATERIP DEsigner
Employment
  • Freelance
    present
Contact Information
Home
Email
Work
Email
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • WordPress
Great pub lunch takeaway deals.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map